Analytical Fifth Reader: Containing an Introductory Article on the General Principles of Elocution : with a Thorough Method of Analysis, ... a Critical Phonic Analysis of English Words ... : Supplemented by Numerous Historical, Biographical, and Explanatory Notes

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Mason Bros., 1867 - 360 pages
 

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Contents

The Battle of Ivry T B Macaulay
58
Appeal for Parliamentary Reform Lord Brougham
61
The Loss of the Arctic Henry W Beecher
62
Peaceable Secession Daniel Webster
63
The Seminoles Reply G W Patten
64
A Political Pause Charles J Fox
65
Adamss Speech on Independence Daniel Webster
66
Conservatism Edward D Baker
67
New England as a Part of the Union Richard Yates
68
The Constitution Andrew Jackson
69
Trees Alfred B Street
71
Analysis of the Same
74
The Same Subject Continued
77
Woodman Spare That Tree George P Morris
80
Snow Bound John G Whittier
84
Analysis of the Same
86
The Vindictive Mate J S Sleeper
89
My Mothers Bible George P Morris
94
The Turf Shall be My Fragrant Shrine Thomas Moore
95
Flowers Horace Smith
96
Repulsive Homes Charles Lamb
98
The Same Subject Continued
101
Dante
102
The Return of the Dead Edna Dean Proclor
103
Theres but One Pair of Stockings to Mend Tonight Anonymous
105
The Miser Charles Dickens
107
The Planting of the Apple Tree William C Bryant
110
The Grateful Lawyer J G Holland
112
When I am Old Caroline A Briggs
114
Truth and Truthfulness J G Holland
115
Abou Ben Adhem Leigh Hunt
117
Im Growing Old John G Saxe
122
The Long Ago B F Taylor
124
Thinking and Reverie Not the Same J G Holland
125
Address to a Mummy Horace Smith
127
Analysis of the Same
129
The SchoolMaster John G Whittier
132
The Power of God Bible
133
Emir Hassan William C Bryant
136
Robinson Crusoes Manner of Living and Dress Daniel De Foe
137
Robinson Crusoe Finds his Man Friday Daniel De Foe
139
The Human Mind William C Bryant
145

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Page 302 - Pr'ythee, lead me in : There take an inventory of all I have, To the last penny : 'tis the king's : my robe, And my integrity to heaven, is all I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell, Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
Page 253 - A hurry of hoofs in a village street, A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark, And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet: That was all ! And yet, through the gloom and the light, The fate of a nation was riding that night; And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight, Kindled the land into flames with its heat.
Page 52 - Ay, tear her tattered ensign down ! Long has it waved on high, And many an eye has danced to see That banner in the sky; Beneath it rung the battle shout, And burst the cannon's roar; — The meteor of the ocean air Shall sweep the clouds no more. Her deck, once red with heroes...
Page 259 - Which he beside the rivulet In playing there had found; He came to ask what he had found That was so large and smooth and round. Old Kaspar took it from the boy Who stood expectant by: And then the old man shook his head, And with a natural sigh "'Tis some poor fellow's skull," said he, "Who fell in the great victory.
Page 85 - The house-dog on his paws outspread Laid to the fire his drowsy head, The cat's dark silhouette on the wall A couchant tiger's seemed to fall; And, for the winter fireside meet, Between the andirons...
Page 255 - So through the night rode Paul Revere ; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm, — A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo...
Page 117 - The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, "The names of those who love the Lord." "And is mine one?
Page 191 - Were half the power that fills the world with terror, Were half the wealth bestowed on camps and courts, Given to redeem the human mind from error, There were no need of arsenals or forts: The warrior's name would be a name abhorred!
Page 66 - They will celebrate it with thanksgiving, with festivity, with bonfires, and illuminations. On its annual return they will shed tears, — copious, gushing tears ; not of subjection and slavery, not of agony and distress, but of exultation, of gratitude, and of joy.
Page 253 - Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride, Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.

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