An introduction to a course of German literature; in lectures to the students of the University of London

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Taylor, 1830 - 158 pages

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Page 146 - Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott, Ein' gute Wehr und Waffen, Er hilft uns frei aus aller Not, Die uns jetzt hat betroffen. Der alt' böse Feind Mit Ernst er's jetzt meint; Groß' Macht und viel List Sein' grausam Rüstung ist, Auf Erd
Page 59 - Dim as the borrowed beams of moon and stars To lonely, weary, wandering travellers, Is reason to the soul; and, as on high Those rolling fires discover but the sky, Not light us here, so reason's glimmering ray Was lent, not to assure our doubtful way, But guide us upward to a better day. And as those nightly tapers disappear, When day's bright lord ascends our hemisphere; So pale grows reason at religion's sight; So dies, and so dissolves in supernatural light.
Page 146 - Und wollt' uns gar verschlingen; So fürchten wir uns nicht so sehr, Es soll uns doch gelingen. Der Fürst dieser Welt, Wie sau'r er sich stellt, Thut er uns doch nichts; Das macht, er ist gericht't, Ein Wörtlein kann ihn fällen.
Page 146 - Jesus Christ, Der Herr Zebaoth, Und ist kein andrer Gott, Das Feld muß er behalten.
Page 6 - Miihlenfels' as the following : — ' If we trace the history of mankind to its earliest dawn, where it disengages itself from mythology — if we inquire into the historical documents of each separate people which by language and literature has transmitted its records to posterity — we find mythology and tales to be the dark commencement of all history ; with which, indeed, they are so interwoven, that the criticism of modern commentators was requisite, in order properly to distinguish between...
Page 59 - DIM as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars To lonely, weary, wandering travellers, Is Reason to the soul : and as on high. Those rolling fires discover but the sky, Not light us here ; so Reason's glimmering ray Was lent, not to assure our doubtful way, But guide us upward to a better day.
Page 9 - It is an undeniable fact that the Jewish people became, in the hands of Providence, the means of sustaining that pure and genuine creed of a single and omnipotent God, which had been gradually lost in the other nations of the world, amidst the increase of immorality. But it is equally certain that they soon fashioned their God after their own idea. In their rude stubbornness, their pride and contempt for other nations, the Jews wanted a national god, and they formed one for themselves. The hierarchy...
Page 10 - ... A child cannot establish the worth of others — reflection never leads it from self-application ; but, in consequence of the predominance of its sensual nature, it seeks for the exclusive possession of enjoyments, praises its received and self-acquired advantages, and longs for those pertaining to others. With the exception of the Romans, this egotism is more perceptible in the Jews than in any other people. They regarded the Pagans as the rejected children of Jehovah ; and it is remarkable...
Page 10 - I may here allude to the fact,' he observes, ' as forming a characteristic feature of the boyhood of mankind, that all those nations of antiquity which are mentioned in history were distinguished by their disregard, or rather contempt, for other nations : A child cannot establish the worth of others — reflection never leads it from self-application ; but, in consequence of the predominance of its sensual nature, it seeks for the exclusive possession of enjoyments, praises its received and self-acquired...
Page 146 - Dank dazu haben. Er ist bei uns wohl auf dem Plan mit seinem Geist und Gaben. Nehmen sie den Leib, Gut, Ehr, Kind und Weib, laß fahren dahin. Sie haben's kein Gewinn. Das Reich muß uns doch bleiben.

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