The Poetical and Dramatic Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Founded on the Author's Latest Edition of 1834 with Many Additional Pieces Now First Included and with a Collection of Various Readings

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Page 202 - And when he had opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of them that were slain for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held: And they cried with a loud voice, saying, How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth?
Page 156 - Like some coy maid half yielding to her lover, It pours such sweet upbraiding, as must needs Tempt to repeat the wrong! And now, its strings Boldlier swept, the long sequacious notes Over delicious surges sink and rise, Such a soft floating witchery of sound...
Page 142 - So on the tip of his subduing tongue All kind of arguments and question deep, All replication prompt, and reason strong, For his advantage still did wake and sleep : To make the weeper laugh, the laugher weep, He had the dialect and different skill, Catching all passions in his craft of will...
Page 156 - O ! the one life within us and abroad, Which meets all motion and becomes its soul, A light in sound, a sound-like power in light, Rhythm in all thought, and joyance everywhere ! Methinks, it should have been impossible Not to love all things in a world so fill'd, Where the breeze warbles and the mute still air Is Music slumbering on her instrument...
Page 157 - And many idle flitting phantasies, Traverse my indolent and passive brain, As wild and various as the random gales That swell and flutter on this subject lute!
Page xx - What little suppers, or sizings, as they were called, have I enjoyed; when .'Eschylus, and Plato, and Thucydides were pushed aside, with a pile of lexicons, &c., to discuss the pamphlets of the day. Ever and anon a pamphlet issued from the pen of Burke. There was no need of having the book before us. Coleridge had read it in the morning; and in the evening he would repeat whole pages verbatim.
Page xvii - Come back into memory, like as thou wert in the dayspring of thy fancies, with hope like a fiery column before thee — the dark pillar not yet turned — Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Logician, Metaphysician, Bard ! How have I seen the casual passer through the cloisters stand still, entranced with admiration, (while he weighed the disproportion between the speech and the garb of the young Mirandula,) to hear thee unfold, in thy deep and sweet intonations, the mysteries of...
Page 166 - With inward stillness, and a bowed mind; When lo! its folds far waving on the wind, I saw the train of the departing Year ! Starting from my silent sadness Then with no unholy madness, Ere yet the...
Page liii - ... the sense of a new style and a new spirit in poetry came over me. It had to me something of the effect that arises from the turning up of the fresh soil, or of the first welcome breath of Spring, " While yet the trembling year is unconfirmed." Coleridge and myself walked back to Stowey that evening, and his voice sounded high " Of Providence, foreknowledge, will, and fate, Fix'd fate, free-will, foreknowledge absolute...
Page 158 - Reflections on Having Left a Place of Retirement Sermoni propriora. - HOR. ' Low was our pretty Cot: our tallest Rose Peep'd at the chamber-window. We could hear At silent noon, and eve, and early morn, The Sea's faint murmur.

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