Report of the Board of Regents

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1848
Vols for 1849-1963/64 include "General appendix to the Smithsonian report" (varies slightly)
 

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Page 6 - Each memoir presented to the institution to be submitted for examination to a commission of persons of reputation for learning in the branch to which the memoir pertains, and to be accepted for publication only in case the report of this commission is favorable.
Page 34 - On the plan proposed for the library, it seems to me that the first thing to be done is to make arrangements for obtaining catalogues, printed or in manuscript, of the principal libraries of the United States; to examine these libraries, as far as can be done personally, in order to know their general character, the statistics of their increase...
Page 6 - '2. Appropriation in different years to different objects; so that in course of time each branch of knowledge may receive a share.
Page 4 - These two objects should not be confounded with one another. The first is to enlarge the existing stock of knowledge by the addition of new truths ; and the second, to disseminate knowledge, thus increased, among men. 6. The will makes no restriction in favor of any particular kind of knowledge ; hence all branches are entitled to a share of attention.
Page 6 - No memoir, on subjects of physical science, to be accepted for publication, which does not furnish a positive addition to human knowledge, resting on original research ; and all unverified speculations to be rejected. 4. Each memoir presented to the institution to be submitted for examination to a commission of...
Page 18 - Much popular interest may be awakened in favor of the institution at "Washington by throwing the rooms of the building open on stated evenings durings the session of Congress for literary and scientific assemblies, after the manner of the weekly meetings of the Royal Institution in London. At these meetings, without the formality of a regular lecture, new truths in science may be illustrated and new objects of art exhibited.
Page 4 - The will makes no restriction in favor of any particular kind of knowledge ; hence all branches are entitled to a share of attention. 7. Knowledge can be increased by different methods of facilitating and promoting the discovery of new truths ; and can be most extensively diffused among men by means of the press.
Page 4 - The property is bequeathed to the United States of America, "to found at Washington, under the name of the SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 9 - Also catalogues of memoirs, and of books in foreign libraries, and other materials, should be collected for rendering the institution a centre of bibliographical knowledge, whence the student may be directed to any work which he may require.
Page 5 - To DIFFUSE KNOWLEDGE. It is proposed— 1. To publish a series of periodical reports on the progress of the different branches of knowledge ; and, 2. To publish occasionally separate treatises on subjects of general interest.

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