Page images
PDF
EPUB

the great military chieftains whose lives and deeds are recorded in history. Our Grant's fame will grow brighter and brighter as the ages roll on.

I send four dollars, for dues, and fifty cents in postage stamps, for reports to be addressed to me as above.

Respectfully yours,

C. GLADDING, 1st Lieutenant 72nd Mlinois Infantry.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA., August 28, 1885. GENERAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Cincinnati, Ohio; DEAR GENERAL-—Professional engagements will prevent me from attending the annual meeting of our Society, at Chicago, in September, prox. This I very much regret, as I anticipate that this meeting will be one of unusual interest. But circumstances beyond my control will keep me at home. My private and professional business demand my constant attention from now unti! I shall be compelled to go to Washington, to enter upon my public duties as represeníative in the National Congress from this district.

My kindest regards to all our comrades. I unite my sorrow with you all, over the death of our old commander.

Yours,

J. LYMAN.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTAtives U. S. /

NEW CASTLE, PA., September 8, 1885. COLONEL L. M. DAYTON,

Chicago: MY DEAR SIR:—The Ohio Brigade has a reunion at Marietta tɔ-morrow. It is difficult for me to choose between it and the meeting of the Society. I want to attend both. But as I can't, and as I have had but little opportunity to see the men of my old immediate command since the war, I have concluded to go to Marietta. Kind regards to all.

Fraternally yours,

Oscar L. JACKSON.

Madison, Wis., September 4, 1885. COLONEL L. M. DAYTON,

Secretary of Society, Army of Tennessee: My Dear COLONEL:—It looks now as though it would not be possible to attend the meeting. I should be much obliged if you would informn me how much I am in arrears to the Society, and I will send draft for the amount. Hoping that you will have a successful and happy meeting,

Yery truly yours,

Chas. G. MAYERS.

CARBONDALE, ILL., September 7, 1885. GENERAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Corresponding Secretary of the Society Army of the Tennessee,

Chicago, Ill.: MY DEAR SIR:-I greatly regret that circumstances beyond my control compel a declination of the kind invitation sent me to be present at the eighteenth annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, in Chicago on the 9th and roth instant. Hoping the comrades assembling will each and every one enjoy himself to the full, and be enabled on many future occasions to participate in reunion with the Society, I remain, very respectfully, etc.,

D. H. BRUSH, Late Colonel 18th Ill. Vol. and Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. Vol.

SAUK CENTRE, MINN., September 4, 1885. GeneRAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Chicago, Illinois: Dear GENERAL:—I had hoped that I might be able to attend every reunion of our Society hereafter, but find this world full of disappointment.

I shall be with you in spirit at Chicago, but cannot attend in person.

I wish to be remembered to all of the ist Brigade 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, and all others who inquire after me.

Hoping you may all enjoy a royal good time, and that this will be the last roll-call of the Society when I shall be marked absent, I remain, your comrade,

A. BARTO, Late Captain 52nd Ill. Infantry.

LINCOLN, CAL., August 21, 1885. LIEUTENANT W. S. SCRIBNER:

DEAR SIR:-I have the honor to inform you that I wili not attend the eighteenth reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, to be held in your city, my former home. Give my regards to General Ştockton, Colonel Sexton, and other army friends. Wishing you a right good time, I am, truly,

Your comrade,

C. GLADDING, Late 1st Lieutenant Co. K. 72nd Ill. Vol.

DAYTON, O., August 30, 1885. LIEUTENANT WILEY S. SCRIBNER,

Secretary Local Executive Committee, Chicago, Ill.: SIR:-I regret to inform you that ill health renders it impossible for me to attend the coming meeting of the Army of the Tennessee. Hoping that the reunion will be a large and pleasant one, I am, very respectfully,

ISAAC N. WALTER,

TWENTIETH NATIONAL EXCAMPMENT, G. A. R.,

419 CALIFORNIA STREET, Room 12,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., September 3, 1885. GENERAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Corresponding Secretary Society of the Army of the Tennessee: Dear Sir:-On behalf of the General Committee of Management, charged with the duty of making arrangements for the twentieth national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic, to be held in this city, we have the honor to extend your Society a cordial invitation to hold your next annual reunion (1886) in San Francisco.

We seel warranted in saying that the citizens of San Francisco, and of our State at large, will do all in their power to make your visit agreeable and memorable.

Satisfactory arrangements for transportation will be made, of which due notice will be given.

Trusting that we shall receive from your Society a favorable reply, we are, dear sir,

Very truly yours,

W. R. SMEDBERG,
D. M. CASHIN,
ALEX. G. HAWES,
ED. CARLSON,

W. L. ELLIOTT.
S. S. DORR,

Secretary.
By 11. Bartling, Assistant Secretary.

CHESTER, ILL., September 5, 1885. COLONEL L. M. DAYTON,

Recording Secretary Society Army of the Tennessee: Dear COLONEL:-For months I have been anticipating the pleasure of meeting with the Society on the gth and ioth instant, but Circuit Court, with my own, and the interests of others, preclude the possibility.

Wishing you a royal good time, and with kind regards to all members of the Society, Faithfully yours,

R. H. MANN.

General U. S. Grant, died at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, New York, at 8:08 o'clock A. M., Thursday, July 23d, 1885.

General Grant was born in the village of Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27th, 1882. Entered West Point Academy, May 31st, 1839. graduated therefrom four years later, and entered the army as Brevet Second Lieutenant 4th U. S. Infantry, September 30th, 1843. With this regiment, he served throughout the Mexican war, and immediately upon his return to the

United States, on the 22nd of August, 1848, was married to Miss Julia Dent.

He was subsequently stationed at Sackett's Harbor, New York; Detroit, Michigan; ard in 1851 was ordered to duty on the Pacific Coast. On the 5th of July, 1853, he was promoted to a captaincy, but resigned his commission one year later, and returned to civil life.

When the Rebellion began, he tendered his services, and was soon thereafter appointed Colonel 21st Illinois Infantry. In August, 1861, he was appointed Brigadier-General, and immediately after the capture of Fort Donald. son, was promoted to Major-General U. S. Volunteers.

The first commander of the Army of the Tennessee, Commander-in-Chief of the armies of the United States, and twice President of the Republic, his subsequent history is but the history of our country.

By his own talents and ability, he rose from an humble position in private life, to one of the most exalted positions ever occupied by man, and yet he never grew above or away from a heartfelt sympathy with the masses, in all that pertained to the best interests of those whose love, affection and devotion he retained to the last.

As the first soldier of the age, he successfully led our armies by decisive victories, to an enduring peace.

As a conquerer, he dictated terms to the vanquished, more liberal than ever before known.

As a statesman, by inaugurating and pushing to a successful issue the great principle of arbitration, he placed peace before war, and achieved the crowning victory of his life at Geneva.

As a friend he was enduring, steadfast, trusting and true; fidelity to their cause was the law of his being.

Captain John E. Fones died at Carroll, Iowa, October 27th, 1884.

Captain Jones was born in North Hadley, Mass., April 15th, 1837, and removed to Milwaukee, Wis., when sixteen years of age. Upon the declaration of war, he repaired to Madison, Wis., and on the 17th of April, 1861, enlisted in Co. "K,” ist Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, for the three months' service.

On the 11th of October, 1861, he was commissioned Captain, and assigned to duty as Regimental Quartermaster of the 16th Wisconsin Volunteers. With his regiment he participated in the battles of Shiloh and Corinth, and the operations around Vicksburg, immediately after the capture of which place, he was appointed by the President, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, in which capacity he served to the close of the war, and his muster out at Madison Wisconsin, December 3d, 1864.

He then established the grain and live stock firm of Jones & Parsons, but his health failing, under a renewal of an army-contracted disease, he removed to Dakota, and from there to Carroll, Iowa. His continuous suffering and frequent hemorrhages so weakened him, that he was unable to resist a slight attack of typhoid fever, which carried him away, leaving a dependent wife and three small children.

Captain Fosiah Barber, died at Cleveland, Ohio, December 10th, 1884.

Captain Barber was born at Cleveland, Ohio, December 3rd, 1825. Adopting the profession of civil engineering, he was for many years engaged in railroad construction on many important lines centering at Cleveland. In 1950 he removed to Columbus, where, in the following year, he married Miss Caroline I. Cooke. (an accomplished daughter of a worthy pioneer citizen of Franklin County,) who lives to sadly realize and lament her affectionate husband's untimely death. In July, 1862, he entered the army as 2nd Lieuterant, 95th O. V. Infantry, Colonel McMillen, commanding. He first served with credit in Kentucky, and then aided in the capture of Jackson, Miss.; operated with the forces about Big Black river; participated with the 15th Army Corps in the various assaults at Vicksburg.

During the winter of 1863-4, his regiment was assigned to the 16th Army Corps, afterwards commanded by General A. J. Smith, with which it served to the close of the war. Participated in the engagement at Guntown under General Sturgis; the contests with General Forrest around Memphis; with General Jo. Mower in his campaign through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of General Price; participated with his regiment at the Battle of Nashville, he was of the assaulting column, which, near the close of the engagement, carried one of the most important positions of the enemy and captured a Confederate Battery. His command was then transferred to New Orleans, where, under the leadership of General Canby, he assisted in the capture of Mobile and Spanish Fort.

With his regiment he was mustered out of the service at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, August 19th, 1865.

As evidence of the services rendered, it may be mentioned that the "rolls" disclose the sad fact that of 1,085 officers and men enlisted, 528 officers and men were either killed in battle or died of wounds or disease contracted in the service.

After the close of the war, he returned to his old home at Cleveland, where he resided until the close of his most honorable and useful life.

He was one of the Vice-Presidents of our Society, and from its organization to the time of his death, never missed attending a reunion. Much in truth might be written of his nobility of character, his sacrifices for his country and his devotion to his family. We, his companions, will sadly miss his kindly smile and cordial greeting, which was one of the inost pleasant incidents of our annual meetings.

The President.—The next report in order will be that of our Recording Secretary, Colonel Dayton, and enquired of Colonel Cadle, if he had the report of the Secretary, who said he had

not.

The President.--I have one or two letters from Colonel Dayton, which I will read, and which will explain to the Society why

« EelmineJätka »