The Confessions of St. Augustine, Including the Imitation of Christ

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 1. juuni 2006 - 388 pages
Whensoever a man desireth aught above measure, immediately he becometh restless. The proud and the avaricious man are never at rest; while the poor and lowly of heart abide in the multitude of peace. The man who is not yet wholly dead to self, is soon tempted, and is overcome in small and trifling matters. It is hard for him who is weak in spirit, and still in part carnal and inclined to the pleasures of sense, to withdraw himself altogether from earthly desires.-from The Imitation of ChristHere, in one volume, are two of the most influential works of Christian spirituality and philosophy: The Confessions of St. Augustine and The Imitation of Christ.Aurelius Augustinus, aka SAINT AUGUSTINE (354-430) was bishop of Hippo, today called Bona, in Algeria. Before his conversion to Christianity, however, he lead a wild and licentious youth in Carthage and later studied philosophy for years in Milan. His Confessions, in which he begs forgiveness from God for his sins and sets himself entirely to devotion to God, is not only a foundational work of Western theology, it is also one of the earliest autobiographies, offering keen insight into the workings of the medieval mind.Written in Latin in the early 15th century, The Imitation of Christ is perhaps second only to the Bible in importance in Christian thought. Thomas Hemerken, aka THOMAS KEMPIS (1380-1471), was a Christian monk and mystic from Kempen, Germany, and he intended this patchwork of medieval mysticism for the most sincere and dedicated of believers-monks, nuns-but lay Christians find wisdom in his encouragement and teaching of a direct path to a relationship with God.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Saint Augustine's The City of GodOF INTEREST TO: readers of Christian theology, students of medieval literatureAUTHOR BIO: British clergyman and translator EDWARD BOUVERIE PUSEY (1800-1882) was one of the most influential figures in the Anglican church in the 19th century, formulated theology and doctrine that radically altered the practice of Christianity in England.British author WILLIAM BENHAM (1831-1910) also wrote Old St. Paul's Cathedral and The Benham Book of Palmistry: A Practical Treatise on the Laws of Scientific Hand Reading.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE FIRST BOOK
5
THE SECOND BOOK
23
THE THIRD BOOK
33
THE FOURTH BOOK
47
THE FIFTH BOOK
65
Arrival of Monnlca at Milan her obedience to St Ambrose and
82
THE SEVENTH BOOK
102
THE EIGHTH BOOK
123
Of the Intimate Love of Jesus
256
Of the Lack of all Comfort
257
Of Gratitude for the Grace of God
260
Of the Fewness of those who love the Cross of Jesus
262
Of the Royal Way of the Holy Cross
263
BOOK III
268
What the Truth saith inwardly without Noise of Words
269
How all the Words of God are to be heard with Humility and how many consider them not
270

THE NINTH BOOK
144
THE TENTH BOOK
167
CONTENTS BOOK I
212
Of the Imitation of Christ and of Contempt of the World and all its Vanities
213
Of thinking humbly of Oneself
214
Of the Knowledge of Truth 2 is IV Of Prudence in Action ai? V Of the Reading of Holy Scripture
217
Of Inordinate Affections
219
Of the Danger of too much Familiarity
220
Of Obedience and Subjection
221
Of the Uses of Adversity
224
On avoiding Rash Judgment
226
Of Works of Charity
227
Of bearing with the Faults of Others
228
Of a Religious Life
229
Of the Exercises of a Religious Man
231
Of the Love of Solitude and Silence
233
Of Compunction of Heart
236
Of the Contemplation of Human Misery
237
Of Meditation upon Death
239
Of the Judgment and Punishment of the Wicked
242
Of the Zealous Amendment of our Whole Life
244
BOOK II
248
Of Lowly Submission
250
CHAf TAG HI Of the Good Peaceable Man t IV Of a Pure Mind and Simple Intention
252
Of SelfEsteem
253
Of the Joy of a Good Conscience
254
Of loving Jesus above all Tilings
255
How we mast walk in Truth and Humility before God
272
Of the Wonderful Power of the Divine Love 353
273
Of the Proving of the True Lover
275
Of a Low Estimation of Self in the Sight of God
279
That all Things are to be referred to God as the Final End
280
That it is Sweet to despise the World and to serve God
281
That the Desires of the Heart are to be Examined and Governed
282
Of the Inward Growth of Patience and of the Struggle against Evil Desires
283
Of the Obedience of One in Lowly Subjection after the Example of Jesus Christ
285
Of Meditation upor the Hidden Judgments of God that we may not be lifted up because of our Welldoing
286
How we roust Stand and Speak in Everything that we desire
287
That True Solace is to be sought in God alone
288
That all Care is to be Cast upon God
289
That Temporal Miseries are to be borne patiently after the Example of Christ 250
290
Of bearing Injuries and who shall be approved as truly Patient
291
Of Confession of our Infirmity and of the Miseries of this Life
292
That we must Best in God above all Goods and Gifts
294
Of the Recollection of Gods Manifold Benefits
296
Of Four Things which bring Great Peace
297
Of avoiding Curious Inquiry into the Life of Another
299
Wherein Firm Peace of Heart and True Profit consist
300
Against the Tongues of Detractors 33
303
Of Instability of the Heart and of directing the
309
Of a Good Government in External Things and of having
315
That all Troubles are to be endured for the sake of Eternal
324
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 114 - Who changed the truth of God into a lie, and worshipped and served the creature more than the Creator, who is blessed for ever. Amen.
Page 116 - Let them praise the name of the Lord: for His name alone is excellent; His glory is above the earth and heaven.
Page 37 - Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ. For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power...
Page 118 - For the corruptible body presseth down the soul, and the earthly tabernacle weigheth down the mind that museth upon many things.
Page 112 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without Him was not anything made that was made. In Him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in the darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.
Page 192 - Not that I speak in respect of want : for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound : every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need. I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.
Page 170 - Who wilt not suffer us to be tempted above that we are able; but wilt with the temptation also make a way to escape, that we may be able to bear it.
Page 149 - But this spake he of the Spirit, which they that believed on him were to receive : for the Spirit was not yet given ; because Jesus was not yet glorified.
Page 158 - ... eye hath not seen, nor ear " heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to
Page 170 - For Thou, Lord, dost judge me: because, although no man knoweth the things of a man, but the spirit of a man which is in him, yet is there something of man, which neither the spirit of man that is in him, itself knoweth.

About the author (2006)

Saint Augustine was born to a Catholic mother and a pagan father on November 13, 354, at Thagaste, near Algiers. He studied Latin literature and later taught rhetoric in Rome and Milan. He originally joined the Manicheans, a religious sect, but grew unhappy with some of their philosophies. After his conversion to Christianity and his baptism in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and different perspectives. He believed that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, and he framed the concepts of original sin and just war. His thoughts greatly influenced the medieval worldview. One of Augustine's major goals was a single, unified church. He was ordained a priest in 391 and appointed Bishop of Hippo, in Roman Africa, in 396. Augustine was one of the most prolific Latin authors in terms of surviving works, and the list of his works consists of more than one hundred separate titles. His writings and arguments with other sects include the Donatists and the Pelagians. On the Trinity, The City of God, and On Nature and Grace are some of his important writings. Confessions, which is considered his masterpiece, is an autobiographical work that recounts his restless youth and details the spiritual experiences that led him to Christianity. Many of Augustine's ideas, such as those concerning sin and predestination, became integral to the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. In the Catholic Church he is a saint and pre-eminent Doctor of the Church, and the patron of the Augustinians. He is the patron saint of brewers, printers, and theologians. Augustine died on August 28, 430.

Bibliographic information