The Naturalist in Nicaragua

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University of Chicago Press, 15. okt 1985 - 403 pages
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Arvustused pole kinnitatud, aga Google kontrollib neid võltssisu suhtes ja eemaldab selle.
"The best of all natural history journals which have ever been published."—Charles Darwin, 1874. Beautifully illustrated and a pleasure to read, this classic book describes the geography, geology, ecology, flora, fauna, and native inhabitants of Nicaragua in the nineteenth century. Many of Belt's detailed and accurate observations were not confirmed until decades later—for example, the fact that certain plants have "standing armies" of ants that defend them.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER II
11
Journey up river continued Wild pigs and jaguar Bungos
30
CHAPTER IV
43
CHAPTER V
61
CHAPTER VI
85
Climate of the northeastern side of NicaraguaExcursions around
103
CHAPTER VIII
126
CHAPTER XII
212
CHAPTER XIII
231
CHAPTER XIV
247
CHAPTER XV
275
ConcordiaJinotegaIndian habits retained by the people
292
CHAPTER XVII
308
CHAPTER XVIII
327
Iguanas and lizards Granada Politics Revolutions Cacao
338

Journey to JuigalpaDescription of LibertadThe priest
150
CHAPTER X
176
Start on journey to SegoviaRocky mountain roadA poor lodg
191
CHAPTER XX
358
CHAPTER XXI
374
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About the author (1985)

Thomas Belt (1832-1878) was an English mining engineer and naturalist. He traveled widely, publishing papers on his observations, and worked for several years in Australia, in Nicaragua, and in Colorado.

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