Transactions of the Natural History Society of Glascow, 3–4. köide

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Contents

Loch Lomond The Mammals of the Neighbourhood of By Mr James
186
Polyzoa Notes on a new method of fixing Carboniferous on a layer
207
Mantis The Praying Mantis religiosa Mr Thomas Chapman on 56
211
Boulder of Carboniferous Limestone Shale its probable Geological horizon
224
126
247
Merlin Falco aesalon nesting in a Tree Mr James Lumsden F Z S on
255
Brazil various Natural History specimens from Mr D C Glen on 197
267
Newt Alpine Triton alpestris Mr John M Campbell on the
273
Rissoa striata On Injured Specimens of By Mr David Robertson
278
Duck Longtailed Harelda glacialis Notes on the food of the
279
Ural The Avifauna of the translated from the Russian of Leonida
282
Buzzard Honey Pernis apivorus in Scotland Mr R Gray
303
Buzzard the Roughlegged Archibuteo lagopus Note on the recent
317
Sand Coloured from raised beach near Rutherglen Mr D C Glen
320
Vegetation in the Public Parks Notes on the state of By
324
Meteorological Record kept at Queens Park for 187567
326
Vegetation Notes on the effect of smoke on with a list of Trees
340
Natural History Miscellaneous Notes in By Mr James Napier 194
344
Spiders collected in the West of Scotland in 1876 Notes on some
351
Calamary or Squid Loligo vulgaris Dr Francis P Flemyng F R G S on 1
1
Osprey Pandion haliaëtus Mr James Lumsden F Z S on 3
3
Capercaillie Hybrid between the Black Grouse and the Mr James
39
Weaver Bird Nest of the Mr James Coutts on 82
43
CONTENTS
iii
Falcon Iceland Palco islandicus On the occurrence in Islay of
v
Annelids Notes on a few of the Tubebuilding By Mr David Robertson 31
31

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Page 152 - The discussions that preceded the enunciation of the famous message of 1823 form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of the Monroe Doctrine. They involved, as we shall see, not only the drafting of the President's message, but also the drafting of a suitable reply to Canning's overtures, and an answer to the ideological pronunciamento of the Tsar. Fortunately we have a most remarkable record of them. For the...
Page 215 - ... remarkable region is astonishing, even to those who are familiar with India. It usually rises in tufts with bare spaces between, or the intervals are occupied by creeping plants, which, having their roots buried far beneath the soil, feel little the effects of the scorching sun. The number of these which have tuberous roots is very great ; and their structure is intended to supply nutriment and moisture when during the long droughts they can be obtained nowhere else.
Page 262 - The punctffi on the exterior of the shells appear as small rugosities scattered at random over the surface of the ribs or striae and intervening valleys ornamenting these shells, but when worn to any extent their perforate character at once becomes apparent. They are in particular very numerous on the area and deltidium. These prominent examples of Orthotetes senilis to some extent resemble the variety...
Page 163 - ... in his country, which from the sea there come neither ship nor boat to approach them; it is thought that there in the said fortified islands lyeth all his plate...
Page 117 - ... complete and comparable local catalogues. Till every wellmarked district, — every archipelago, and every important island, has all its known species of the more important groups of animals catalogued on a uniform plan, and with a uniform nomenclature, a thoroughly satisfactory account of the Geographical Distribution of Animals will not be possible.
Page 215 - We see a small plant with linear leaves, and a stalk not thicker than a crow's quill ; on digging down a foot or eighteen inches beneath, we come to a tuber, often as large as the head of a young child; when the rind is removed, we find it to be a mass of cellular tissue, filled with fluid much like that in a young turnip. Owing to the depth beneath the soil at which it is found, it is generally deliciously cool and refreshing. Another kind, named mokuri, is seen in other parts of the country, where...
Page 66 - In Rannoch eagles were, a few years ago, so very numerous that the Commissioners of the Forfeited Estates (after 1745) offered a reward of five shillings for every one that was destroyed ; in a little time such numbers were brought in that the honourable Board reduced the premium to three shillings and sixpence ; but an advance in proportion as these birds grew scarcer might in time perhaps have effected their extirpation.
Page 164 - ... in wars heretofore been attempted, and now of late again by the lord-deputy there, sir Harry Sydney, 'which for want of means for safe conduct upon the water hath not prevailed.
Page 215 - ... is very great; and their structure is intended to supply nutriment and moisture, when, during the long droughts, they can be obtained nowhere else. Here we have an example of a plant, not generally tuberbearing, becoming so under circumstances where that appendage is necessary to act as a reservoir for preserving its life; and the same thing occurs in Angola to a species of grape-bearing vine, which is so furnished for the same purpose. The plant to which I at present refer is one of the cucurbitaceae,...
Page 215 - ... often as large as the head of a young child ; when the rind is removed, we find it to be a mass of cellular tissue, filled with fluid, much like that in a young turnip. Owing to the depth beneath the soil at which it is found, it is generally deliciously cool and refreshing. Another kind, named mokuri, is seen in other parts of the country, where long-continued heat parches the soil. This plant is a herbaceous creeper, and deposits under ground a number of tubers, gome as large as a man's head,...

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