Transactions of the Natural History Society of Glascow, 3–4. köide

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Page 152 - The discussions that preceded the enunciation of the famous message of 1823 form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of the Monroe Doctrine. They involved, as we shall see, not only the drafting of the President's message, but also the drafting of a suitable reply to Canning's overtures, and an answer to the ideological pronunciamento of the Tsar. Fortunately we have a most remarkable record of them. For the...
Page 215 - ... remarkable region is astonishing, even to those who are familiar with India. It usually rises in tufts with bare spaces between, or the intervals are occupied by creeping plants, which, having their roots buried far beneath the soil, feel little the effects of the scorching sun. The number of these which have tuberous roots is very great ; and their structure is intended to supply nutriment and moisture when during the long droughts they can be obtained nowhere else.
Page 262 - The punctffi on the exterior of the shells appear as small rugosities scattered at random over the surface of the ribs or striae and intervening valleys ornamenting these shells, but when worn to any extent their perforate character at once becomes apparent. They are in particular very numerous on the area and deltidium. These prominent examples of Orthotetes senilis to some extent resemble the variety...
Page 163 - ... in his country, which from the sea there come neither ship nor boat to approach them; it is thought that there in the said fortified islands lyeth all his plate...
Page 117 - ... complete and comparable local catalogues. Till every wellmarked district, — every archipelago, and every important island, has all its known species of the more important groups of animals catalogued on a uniform plan, and with a uniform nomenclature, a thoroughly satisfactory account of the Geographical Distribution of Animals will not be possible.
Page 215 - We see a small plant with linear leaves, and a stalk not thicker than a crow's quill ; on digging down a foot or eighteen inches beneath, we come to a tuber, often as large as the head of a young child; when the rind is removed, we find it to be a mass of cellular tissue, filled with fluid much like that in a young turnip. Owing to the depth beneath the soil at which it is found, it is generally deliciously cool and refreshing. Another kind, named mokuri, is seen in other parts of the country, where...
Page 66 - In Rannoch eagles were, a few years ago, so very numerous that the Commissioners of the Forfeited Estates (after 1745) offered a reward of five shillings for every one that was destroyed ; in a little time such numbers were brought in that the honourable Board reduced the premium to three shillings and sixpence ; but an advance in proportion as these birds grew scarcer might in time perhaps have effected their extirpation.
Page 164 - ... in wars heretofore been attempted, and now of late again by the lord-deputy there, sir Harry Sydney, 'which for want of means for safe conduct upon the water hath not prevailed.
Page 215 - ... is very great; and their structure is intended to supply nutriment and moisture, when, during the long droughts, they can be obtained nowhere else. Here we have an example of a plant, not generally tuberbearing, becoming so under circumstances where that appendage is necessary to act as a reservoir for preserving its life; and the same thing occurs in Angola to a species of grape-bearing vine, which is so furnished for the same purpose. The plant to which I at present refer is one of the cucurbitaceae,...
Page 215 - ... often as large as the head of a young child ; when the rind is removed, we find it to be a mass of cellular tissue, filled with fluid, much like that in a young turnip. Owing to the depth beneath the soil at which it is found, it is generally deliciously cool and refreshing. Another kind, named mokuri, is seen in other parts of the country, where long-continued heat parches the soil. This plant is a herbaceous creeper, and deposits under ground a number of tubers, gome as large as a man's head,...

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