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LIST OF EMBELLISHMENTS.

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1.-Christ Blessing Little Children. Engraved by J.

W. Cooke, from a Painting by B. West, P.R.A.
By permission of the Governors of the Foundling
Hospital

(the Frontispiece) 11.--The Head of Christ Crowned with Thorns. En

graved by H. Humphreys, from a Drawing by Sir
Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A., in the possession of

the Proprietors of the Iris (the Vignette) III.--St. John the Evangelist. Engraved by W. Finden,

after a Painting by Dominichino IV.-Nathan and David. Engraved by S. Sangster,

after a Picture by B. West, P. R. A. V.-The Nativity. Engraved by A. W. Warren, after

a Picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R. A. VI.-Madonna and Child. Engraved by A. Fox, after

a Picture by Correggio. By permission of the

Marquis of Eseter
VII.—The , Deluge. Engraved by E. Roberts, after a

Picture by N. Poussin
VIII.-Christ Blessing the Bread. Engraved by W.

Ensom, from a Picture by Carlo Dolci. By per

mission of the Marquis of Exeter IX.-Infant St. John and Lamb. Engraved by Daven

port, after a Painting by Murillo X.-Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces. Engraved

by W. Raddon, after a Picture by Rembrandt XI.---Jesus with Mary, in the Garden. Engraved by

W. Ensom, after a Picture by Titian. By per-
mission of S. Rogers, Esq.

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A SCENE OF THE PESTILENCE.

[Extracted from the Diary of a Non-conformist Minister).

BY THE AUTHOR OF

THE LAST OF THE PLANTAGENETS."

Aug. 24th, 1692.-Here may I raise my Ebenezer, and truly say, Hitherto hath the Lord helped me! for on this day threescore and ten years have passed over my unworthy head;-such having been the duration of my sojourn in this wilderness-world. If I look me adown the long vista of years gone by, what a soul-humiliating appearance doth the sad retrospect present, of opportunities neglected, of deliverances unacknowledged, and of mercies disregarded! When the Prophet saw in a vision by the river Chebar the doings of the Almighty, as shadowed forth by a Throne having many intervolving Wheels, although he understood not the complicated and hidden machinery, yet did he behold a form like unto the Son of Man, guiding and directing the whole. And have I always felt this won

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drous governance, in those perilous times of the Church which I have passed through? Hath my soul, truly and at all times, whilst witnessing the things which have taken place in my day and generation, acknowledged them as the wonderful and incomprehensible works of the Judge of all the Earth? Alas, No! [Here follows a Prayer, lamenting his shortcomings, and the renewal of a covenant, which it appears always formed a part of his devotions on this day; after which, the Diary thus proceeds).

It was, as I remember me, upon this day thirty years, that the good old Mr. Simeon Ash was taken to his rest;—he had preached his wonted lecture at Cornhill, and being heated therewith, took cold in the vestry, and died the same evening at his house at Highgate. It was a solemn season, being that fatal Bartholomew's day when so many of us, who stood around his dying bed, had just been preaching for the last time to our beloved congregations. I returned with the godly Mr. Richard Baxter, who on the way discoursed largely concerning the straits to which the Lord's servants were then reduced by the passing of the disastrous Act of Uniformity : yet hopefully observing, " that our brother Simeon had been seasonably called to heaven, on the very day he was cast out of the visible church on earth.”

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