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CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

SAINT PAUL, MINN., September 27, 1875. GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN,

President Society Army of the Tennessee: Dear GenERAL:—At the regular meeting of the Chamber of Commerce (over which body I have the honor to preside) held September 27th, 1875, the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That the President, in behalf of the Chamber of Commerce, address a communication to General W. T. Sherinan, President of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, cordially inviting that Society to hold its next annual reunion in this city.

Compliance with the above resolution affords me a double pleasure,

First, on behalf of the members of our Chamber, comprising nearly every prominent business man in our city, each one of whom would vie with their fellows in giving a hearty, cordial greeting and welcome to the old veterans who have done so much toward securing to us the blessings we now enjoy as a nation truly free; and,

Second, as an old soldier who would personally deem no sacrifice too great to render honor to those to whom the nation owes so deep a debt of gratitude.

Let me then supplement the invitation of our Chamber by a personal request, and ask your Society to grant to our North Star State the honor of entertaining your Society at its next annual reunion. Your obedient servant,

R. W. JOHNSON, President Chamber of Commerce.

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HEADQUARTERS GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC,

PHILADELPHIA, September 20, 1875. GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN,

President Army of the Tennessee: DEAR SIR:-As the Society of the Army of the Tennessee hold their annual meeting this month, I beg leave to invite their attention, through you, to the propriety of their meeting next year in Philadelphia at the same time as the other army societies.

The Grand Army of the Republic, the Army of the Potomac, the Army of the James and the Army of the Cumberland have already so decided—the first to meet June 28th, the latter July 6th and 7th.

It is the intention of the ex-soldiers here to fill in a week, or even longer, if necessary, for a general reunion of the soldiers and sailors of the war. Each society or association to have one day for its special services, and one day to be set apart for the meeting of all surviving soldiers and sailors.

It is hardly necessary to present any argument in favor of such a reunion. It can hardly be expected that we shall ever have such an opportunity for such a meeting again in this life. By fixing the dates closer together, or better still by instructing a committee to consult with the other organizations and agree on the proper time, ex-soldiers and sailors can, long in advance, make their arrangements to visit the Centennial Exposition at that particular time. It will be a great saving in expense, as thousands from distant points will be unable to make more than one trip, and when, as is the case with thousands, they are entitled to meet with two different army societies, it will be a great satisfaction to be able to meet with them on that trip.

The Grand Army, in fixing the date for their meeting, (June 28th,) was influenced by the fact that their comrades in Philadelphia realized that on July 4th the special services would be of such a nature that the city would be overcrowded, and it would be more satisfactory to them if the reunions could be held in the week preceding. Still it might be very appropriate to have the general meeting referred to on that day.

I trust that your Society will therefore give us Eastern men a chance to see them and shake hands with them. It is hardly necessary to say in advance that Philadelphia will give a cordial welcome to all who will come. Our Grand Army Committee, I know, will be glad to assist any local committee you may appoint, in securing proper accommodations.

Yours fraternally,

ROBERT B. BEATH,

A. G., G. A. R.

HEADQ’RS MILITARY Division OF THE ATLANTIC,

New York City, September 2, 1875. To the Committee on Invitations S. A. T., Des Moines, Iowa:

GENTLEMEN :-I am in receipt of your letter of the 24th ultimo, inviting me, in behalf of the citizens of Des Moines, to be present on the occasion of the ninth annual reunion of the Army of the Tennessee, on the 29th and 30th of this month, and tendering me the hospitalities of the city for the occasion. I highly appreciate the honor of your invitation, and under other circumstances would have been happy to accept, but my domestic circumstances are such that I could neither confer pleasure upon others, nor enjoy the occasion myself, and am, therefore, compelled to decline your courteous invitation. I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant,

W. S. HANCOCK, Major-General, U. S. A.

SAINT PAUL, MINN., September 9, 1875. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER, GENERAL J. M. TUTTLE, ET. AL.,

Committee: GENTLEMEN:—I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your kind invitation to be present at the ninth annual reunion of the Army of the Tennessee.

It would give me great pleasure to accept it were I able to do so, but my public duties call me to the neighborhood of the Black Hills, and I can not hope to return thence until after the day fixed for your meeting.

Thanking you most heartily for your courtesy, I am, very respectfully and sincerely yours,

Alfred H. TERRY.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC, I

San FRANCISCO, CAL., September 2, 1875. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER, GENERAL J. M. TUTTLE AND OTHERS,

Committee on Invitations Society Army Tennessee, Des Moines, Iowa: GentLEMEN:-I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your kind invitation, on behalf of the citizens of Des Moines, to attend the approaching reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, for which please accept my thanks with the assurance of my sincere regret that official duties, and other circumstances make it impossible for me to meet my old comrades

this year.

With best wishes for a most happy reunion at Des Moines, and warm response to all, I remain, very respectfully and very truly yours,

J. M. Schofield, Major-General, U. S. A.

WASHINGTON, D. C., August 30, 1875. General E. D. Townsend, U. S. A., very much regrets it will not be in his power to accept the tender of hospitalities in behalf of the citizens of Des Moines, on the occasion of the annual reunion of the Army of the Tennessee, September 29th and 30th.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 3, 1875. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER, GENERAL J. M. TUTTLE AND OTHERS,

Committee on Invitations, Des Moines, Iowa: GentleMEN:-I have had the honor to receive your invitation to the ninth annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, at Des Moines, on the 29th and 30th of September.

It would give me great pleasure to accept your hospitable invitation, but I regret to say that official occupation in Washington prevents my doing so. Returning you my sincere thanks for your courtesy, I am, with great regard, Very respectfully yours,

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General l'ols.

WASHINGTON City, D. C., September 3, 1875. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER,

Des Moines, Iowa: DEAR SIR:-Be pleased to accept for yourself and Committee my thanks for the invitation in behalf of the citizens of Des Moines, to be present at the ninth annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, and my regrets that it will be impossible to avail myself of their kindness. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. K. BARNES, Surgeon General, U. S. A.

Post Office DEPARTMENT,

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 3, 1875. My Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your very polite invitation to be present upon the occasion of the ninth annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, to be held at Des Moines, Iowa, on the 29th and 30th instant.

In reply I have to say that owing to pressure of public business I very much regret my inability to accept your kind invitation, but my best wishes are with the soldier boys, and I have no doubt they will make the occasion a very pleasant one. If my duties permitted I should very gladly avail myself of your courtesy, for which accept my thanks.

Very truly yours,

MARSHALL JEWELL. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER,

Chairman, etc., Des Moines, Iowa.

WAR DEPARTMENT, QUARTERMASTER GENERAL'S OFFICE,

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 2, 1875. General Ingalls presents his compliments to Messrs. C. C. Carpenter and others of the Committee, and regrets that public business will prevent his attendance at the reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee on the 29th and 30th instant.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION OF THE SOUTH,

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 14, 1875. Gov. C. C. CARPENTER,

And Members of the Com. on Inv., S. A. T., Des Moines: GENTLEMEN:- I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation, tendered in behalf of the citizens of Des Moines, for General McDowell and staff to attend the ninth annual reunion of the Army of the Tennessee.

In reply I beg to inform you that General McDowell is now in Europe.

In his behalf and as a member of his staff I have to thank you for the very distinguished honor of your invitation. I am gentlemen, with great respect, your obedient servant,

John H. Coster, Captain 8th Cav., Aide-de-Camp to Major-Gen. McDowell.

St. LAWRENCE Bay, September 20, 1875. General W. T. SHERMAX,

President Society of the Army of the Tennessee: Dear GENERAL:—I came out here nearly two months ago to try the sea for a rest, determined to return in time to meet you all at the “ reunion;" but I find I am not yet good enough sailor to bring my ship safely to port in time, and must therefore give up my contemplated good time.

Please extend my regrets to the Society. It is a double disappointment to me as I hoped to meet and welcome my old comrades in my own home state. Yours very truly,

G. M. DODGE.

St. Louis, September 27, 1875. GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN:

My Dear GeneRAL:-Circumstances beyond my control prevent my attendance at the reunion of the Army of the Tennessee, and I beg you to express my regrets to my old comrades-in-arms that I can not meet them at Des Moines, and especially, General, do I regret not to be able to see the men and officers of the 3rd Iowa Vet. Volunteer Cavalry—“My own regiment.” Iowa men, as you have often testified, did their country's service well on the field, and we may all rest assured, General, that they will be steadfast to the cause of good government at home. Such patriotic ardor as they displayed does not soon die out.

May the Society of the Army of the Tennessee ever possess the purity of Iowa's north-west breeze, and a breadth of soul to be compared to the vastness of Iowa's prairies.

Sincerely yours,

John W. NOBLE, 3rd Iowa Vet. Vol. Cavalry.

Law Office of Eldridge & TOURTELLOTTE,

} CHICAGO, September 28, 1875. GENERAL:— Up to the present time I have hoped to be able to meet you at Des Moines, and extend the “right hand of fellowship” to my old comrades of the Army of the Tennessee, but at this last moment I find it out of my power to leave my business just at this time, even for two days.

Believe me, however, that as you all recount the days of danger and deeds of daring, which have now become a part of the world's best history, I shall be with you in spirit. With congratulations and with regrets I must say, hail friends.

Yours always,

H. N. ELDRIDGE. To GENERAL HICKENLOOPER.

BELVIDERE, ILLINOIS, September 26, 1875. GENERAL A. HICKEN LOOPER,

Secretary, etc.. My Dear Sir:—It is with great regret that I have abandoned the idea of being with the Society at Des Moines.

I am so situated that I can not leave home for such a distance at this time. Do me the favor of conveying the assurances of most kindly remembrance to those who shall meet, and believe me, Yours very sincerely,

S. A. HURLBUT.

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