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venture not to be a great artist and and make fountains of them! And let where the absence of genius is notice- every citizen convicted of personal muable. To ask whether there will be a sic, be tied to a piano and ordered to Degenais in the piece, is to inquire march! For the idea of forty millions whether I know my business. Of of people-all artists, eating, drinking, course there will be one; and this per- absorbing and emitting nothing but art, sonage, whom I shall make as crabbed and all capable of propagating their as is consistent with my own gentle na species, is grotesque, inhuman, appallture, will make himself especially dis- ing!' agreeable by perpetually requesting to “Among these forty millions of vocabe told what is meant, in France, by tions there must be some mistakes a thwarted vocation. “What's a vocation either of nature or of education. It is thwarted,” he exclaims, “in a country to be hoped that there will be a few where everybody paints, or rhymes, or blunders, a little confusion, a certain sculps or sings flat? Whence comes number of bad lots. It cannot be that that absurd legend about the provincial God has thus far protected France only parent, who disinherits his boy for that the Krupp guns of the next war having run away to Paris to be a great may strew the soil with hundred man? I'll give a white rabbit with thousand Raphaels, Mozarts, Jean Gouruby eyes, to anybody who will produce jons and Racines with as many more a young Frenchman with an ambition Molières, Beethovens, Michael Angelos to smear the well-stretched canvass, and Shakespeares, all belonging to the and whose father has not ruined him- National Guard. self by promoting the boy's vocation. “For the fact is,” adds M. Degenais, In every family budget there is now a "that besides having a gift for any sum reserved for the publication of that given art one must have practice in it, first volume of verse wherewith every and there's the rub! For practice chicken chips his shell. A man cannot means hard work, and hard work is marry until he has exhibited at least something horrible.” one picture. “Then,” says my old ape Translated for The Living Age from the French of a Degenais “I rise to inform my na- of Emile Bergerot. tive land that she is suffering from a plethora of genius and needs to be bled. ‘France,' I would say, 'thy walls are all painted. Thy stock of paper is hausted. Thou hast no more of that vile clay which they call potter's-earth.

From St. James's Gazette.

CHEATING AT GOLF. One melody trickles from every one of thy windows and there is no such thing Golf is the only first-class game at as a minute's silence to be had in all which cheating is at all easy-supposthe length and breadth of thy territory. ing, of course, that the player is unIt is time to pause. I propose a Minis- accompanied by a caddy; and even try of Artistic Discouragement. Dis- when accompanied by a caddy it is still courage! discourage! if need be, by quite possible to cheat. If a player, force. Offer prizes for the renunciation having played five strokes, says to his of genius! Let the highest be for those caddy, "That is four, is it not?” the latwho will swear to enjoy art without at ter will probably reply, “I think it's tempting to produce it. Let the Legion- five, sir;" but if the player responds, of-Honor-for-exceptional-services be "Oh, no, I'm sure it's only four," the awarded to those who will make a pub- caddy will probably say no more. Poslic holocaust of their works! Let pre- sibly at the end of the match he may fectures be assigned to the brave fel- mention to the other caddy his opinion lows who will jump on their own can- of the circumstance, but this will not vasses, or ride over them on horseback; affect the player's reputation unless he or who will fit their statues with pipes happens to be at his own club. Even

ex

then it will take a good long time, and which my opponent blundered, watchmany repetitions of various caddies' iug his head and shoulders—the only adverse opinions of his arithmetical part of him visible–from the other powers to throw anything like a seri- side. He made several strokes, and at ous doubt upon his honor. And yet last jerked the ball over. I thought it what club is there which does not pos- had taken four to get out, but he de. sess one or two members of whom it is clared that the three first strokes were sotto roce said that if you play with only practice ones at the sand. I, of them you will have to look pretty course, could not contradict this, and, sharply after their score?

being of a placable temperament, reIt is the commonly accepted belief frained from pointing out that it was that the vast majority of golf players scarcely etiquette to practise strokes belong to a class which is incapable of when practically out of sight in a cheating-at all events out of business bunker. hours. I am sorry to have to express Apart from instances of this sort, the deliberate conviction that the be- nothing is easier than to intentionally lief in the honor and honesty of golfers forget a stroke when counting up after has very unsubstantial foundation in holing out on the green. As a matter of fact. I have golfed for a number of fact, unless one steadily counts as one years over all kinds of greens, and goes along, it is quite easy to genuwith all sorts of people; and on in- icely make a mistake, and it is to this numerable occasions I have been fact that the habitual cheater trusts driven to strongly suspect my oppo- should at any time his miscount be denent of cheating, and on many occa- tected. And if, being somewhat sions I have positively detected him in doubtful of the accuracy of his comso doing. In a match, as every golfer putation, you endeavor to recall his inknows, the two players

often dividual strokes, he will very likely pretty widely separated. Under such tell you that it is not etiquette to do circumstances it is obvious that vari. so. No doubt he is right in a certain ous minor acts of cheating are com- seuse, for it is the honorable custom of paratively easy. If a player discovers good golfers to entirely trust each his ball in a rather bad lie, he can, in other in the matter of counting strokes. the act of addressing, alter its position, Put if one's suspicions are aroused as and thus give himself a good lie. Such to the untrustworthiness of the mema thing as missing the ball altogether ory of your opponent (to put it pois not unknown even with fairly expe- litely), it is impossible to avoid keeping rienced players; and I have known

an eye

him and counting his many instances when I have not been strokes; and when your total does not obviously looking, but have only de- tally with his it seems only right to tected out of the corner of my eye that point out the fact. As a matter of my opponent has had a mishap of this fact, the true scoring etiquette of golf kind-that the coup dans l'air bas not enjoins the frequent mutual reference been counted unless I have drawn at by the two players to their several tention to it when on the green. Of scores. Most players ought to be apcourse this miscounting of strokes is proaching the putting green, and conmuch easier when the fortunes of the sequently pretty

together, at game carry the two players on differ their third stroke; and by that time a ent sides of a hedge or other defence pleasant colloquy of "You've played from observation. I remember on one the odd," or "Shall I play the like?" occasion, having satisfactorily negoti- should be easily practicable, and alated a somewhat high bunker into ways is desirable.

are

on

near

Sixth Series, Volume xiv.

}

No. 2762–June 12, 1897.

From Beginning,

Vol. CCXIII.

CONTENTS.

691 705

717 724

I. A COMMON CITIZENSHIP FOR THE EN-
GLISH RACE. By A. V. Dicey,

Contemporary Review,
II. PAINTERS BEHIND THE SCENES,

Edinburgh Review,
III. IN KEDAR'S TENts. By Henry Seton

Merriman, Chaps. XXI. and XXII.,
IV. THE BLUE JAR. By H. Garton Sargent, Blackwood's Magazine,
V. RECOLLECTIONS OF FREDERICK DENI-

son MAURICE. By Edward Strachey, · Cornhill Magazine, VI. AMONG THE LIARS. By H. C. Lowther, Nineteenth Century, VII. ON THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF

LOCAL COLOR. By W. P. James, Macmillan's Magazine, .
VIII. RUSSIA ON THE BOSPHORUS. By Capt.
J. W. Gambier, R. N.,

Fortnightly Review,
IX. HERR RICHTER'S GREAT SPEECH, London Times,

.

.

730 738

743

.

749 751

.

POETRY.
690 Not In TEMPLES MADE WITH HANDS, 690
690

COLUMBUS AT SEVILLE,
EPITHALAMIUM,

.

SUPPLEMENT. READINGS FROM AMERICAN

READINGS FROM NEW BOOKS : MAGAZINES :

THE WARNING OF MONT SAINT MIDSUMMER BUTTERFLIES,

753

MICHEL. By Isabel Whitely, 765 OVER-CIVILIZATION,

754 A REMINISCENCE,

756

SPITZBERGEN AS A SUMMER RETHE FOUNDER OF THE REVUE

SORT. By Sir Martin Conway, 768 DES DEUX MONDES,

757 Tolstor's NEGATIONS. By Prince MR. CHAMBERLAIN IN THE

Serge Wolkonsky,

771 HOUSE OF COMMONS,

759
A GROUP OF SONNETS.

By EdOLD DAYS AT PRINCETON, . 760

ward Cracroft Lefroy,

774 MARLBOROUGH HOUSE,

761 " STRANGERS IN THE HOUSE," 763 BOOKS OF THE MONTH,

776 WHY THE ARBITRATION TREATY WAS REJECTED,

764

.

.

.

.

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY

THE LIVING AGE COMPANY, BOSTON.

ers

COLUMBUS AT SEVILLE.

The frigate-bird go whistling-see the

flashAt Salamanca then they tested us; Churchmen and schoolmen and cosmogon

The light on Guanahani! Salvador!

Let thy Cross flame upon me in that star, In council. "Hey!" and "What?” “The And from that Cross outstretch her sainted

hands! earth a sphere? And two ways to Cathaia?" "Tut and AKTAUR THOMAS QUILLER COUCH.

tush!" "Feared the Cathaians then no b'ood in

the head From walking upside down?" "Pray did I know

EPITHALAMIUM. Of a ship 'would sail up-hill ?” “Had I Here ends all art, all artificers end: not heard

Come ye, look thro' our little golden Perchance of latitudes when the wheel of

loop; the sun

Here is the best that heaven to earth did Kept the sea boiling? Of the tropic point

send, Where white men turned hop-skip to

Here is the bond of love, and joy, and blackamoors ?"

hope; "And hark ye, sir, to what Augustine says The soldier's laurel, poet's bay, down fling, And here is Cosmos' map. 'God built the Take up this tiny wreath, the marriage world

ring. As a tabernacle: sky for roof and sides, And earth for flooring. .. Made all men

The double bow, which heralds sunny to dwell

weather, Upon the face of it'—the face, you hear,

The shining halo of the rising day, Not several faces-'On foundations laid

Th' equator smooth, which binds the The earth abides' — formations, if you

world together, please,

The chaplet fair, that sounds the brow Not mid-air. Soothly, sir, at your con

of May, ceits

A diadem by meanest mortals owned, We smile, but warn you that they lie not

Who rightly wears thee, sits a king enfar

throned. On this tide heresy. 'Antipodes,' hey? Our Mother Church annuls the Antip- Let but a slender finger swift pass thro' odes.”

thee, Fools, fools, Diego! Ay, but folly makes Hold fast by this, and woe may not undo

And all delights shall follow in its train. More orphans than malevolence.

thee, There I stood

That brave ring-armor blunts the edge Rejected, and the good queen looked on

of pain. me, She did not smile. Thank God she did not Genties, but harken to the minstrel's

voice, smile. She did not speak. I saw the mute lips And ye’ shall ne'er repent, but aye rejoice.

C. E. D. PHELPS. Compassionate, and took defeat, went

forth.

move

Further than I have travelled she hath

NOT IN TEMPLES MADE WITH HANDS. fared: But I shall follow. Soon will come the God dwells not only where, o'er saintis

dust, call: And I shall grip the tiller once again,

The sweet bells greet the fairest morn

of seven; The purple night shall heave upon the

Wherever simple folk love, pray, and floor Mile after mile; the dawn invade the stars, trust,

Behold the House of God, the gate of The stars the dawn-how long? And fol

heaven! lowing down The moon's long ripple I shall hear again

FREDERICK LANGBRIDGE.

A

From The Contemporary Review.

that London should be ruled by a govCOMMON CITIZENSHIP FOR THE ernment in Washington. My plan, so ENGLISH RACE.

far from contemplating the political My aim is to establish the possibility unity of England and America, does not

even involve a permanent alliance, deand advocate the policy of instituting a common citizenship for all English- sirable as such an alliance might be,

between the two countries. If common men and Americans. My proposal is

citizenship were instituted to-morrow, summarily this: That England and the

England and the United States would United States should, by concurrent

in no sense be partners in a war, e.g., and appropriate legislation, create such

between England and Russia, or bea common citizenship, or, to put the

tween America and France. In this matter in a more concrete and therefore

matter much instruction may be dein a more intelligible form, that an act

rived from the annals of Germany; for of the Imperial Parliament should

in Germany isopolity preceded in pracmake every citizen of the United States, during the continuance of peace be- tice, if not in theory, the development tween England and America, a British duced more to German well-being, and

of political unity, and nothing has consubject, and that simultaneously an act

ultimately to German greatness, than of Congress should make every British

the ease with which the subjects of one subject, during the continuance of such

German State passed into the public peace, a citizen of the United States.

any employment of

other. Stein, The coming into force of the one act Scharnhorst, Niebuhr, and Moltke were would be made dependent upon the

none of them Prussians, but they prepassing and coming into force of the served the existence or extended the inother. Should war at any time break

fluence of Prussia. It is but the other out between the two countries, each act day that Beust passed from the service would ipso facto cease to have effect. This is in substance my proposition. service of Austria. What my proposal

of Saxony to find a greater career in the It is purposely expressed in the broad

does aim at is, in short, not political est and most general terms. Qualifica- unity, but, in strictness, common cittions and limitations, which must of ne

izenship. Were it carried into effect, cessity be inserted in any actual act of the net result would be that every Parliament, or of Congress, constitut- American citizen would, on landing at ing such common citizenship, or, to em

Liverpool, possess the same civil and ploy a useful but pedantic term, political rights as would, say, an in“isopolity," are for the sake of clearness habitant of Victoria who landed at the omitted. With provisos and exceptions

same moment from the same boat; and my readers need not for the moment

that an Englishman who stepped for concern themselves. They should, the first time on American soil would however, note one preliminary observa- possess there all the civil and political tion, the overlooking whereof might rights which would necessarily belong lead to misapprehension of my whole to an American citizen who, having plan.

been born abroad, had for the first time Common citizenship, or isopolity, has entered the United States. no necessary connection whatever with

The idea of a common citizenship for national or political unity. My pro- the whole English people is novel. My posal is not designed to limit the com- proposal, therefore, must of necessity plete national independence either of sound startling. My purpose is to England or of the United States. It establish, first, that my plan is pracwould be not only an absurdity, but al- ticable; secondly, that the immediate most an act of lunacy, to devise or de effects of common citizenship would be fend a scheme for turning England and extremely small, but, as far as they America into one State. It is as impos- went, wholly good; thirdly, that the insible, as, were it possible, it would be direct and moral, and, ultimately, the undesirable, that Washington should be political results of common citizenship ruled by a government in London, or might be great and extremely beneficial;

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