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EK 'Onk PUBLIC LIBRARY

581578

*IOR, LENOX AND TIL DEN FOUNDATION R 1912

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it useful, notwithstanding all objections to the contrary.

2. Of the method and due restrictions to be observed

in the study of it.

73

L E T T E R V.

1. The great use of history, properly so called, as distin-

guished from the writings of mere annalists and anti-

quaries. 2. Greek and Roman historians.

idea of a complete history. 4. Further cautions to be

observed in this study, and the regulation of it accord-

ing to the different professions, and situations of men:

above all, the use to be made of it (1) by divines,

and ( 2 ) by those who are called to the service of

92

LE T T E R V I.

From what period modern history is peculiarly useful to

the service of our country, viz. From the end of

the fifteenth century to the present. The division of

3. Some

their country.

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I have considered formerly, with a good deal of attention, the subject on which you command me to communicate my thoughts to you: and I practised in those days, as much as business and pleasure allowed me time to do, the rules that seemed to me necessary to be observed in the study of history. They were very different from those which writers on the same subject have recommended, and which are commonly practised. But I confess to your lordship, that this neither gave me then, nor has given me since, any distrust of them. I do not affect fingularity. On the contrary, I think that a due deference is to be paid to received opinions, and that a due compliance with received customs is to be held; though both the one and the other should be, what they often are, absurd or ridiculous. But this fervitude is outward only, and abridges in no sort the liberty of private judgment. The obliga. tions of submitting to it likewise, even, outwardly,

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