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when Queen Aone refused her assent to a Scotch may compare with the Knightlow manorial cusMilitia Bill. During the agitation for Roman tom, and be equally ancient. A. HALL. Catholic emancipation, towards the close of the reign of George III., that king threatened to witb- “LIKE A BOLT FROM THE BLUE" (8th S. iii. bold bis concent from any alteration in the law, 345).—DR. CHANCE, in his short note on this subconsidering that his coronation oath forced him to ject, seems to me to lay himself open to objection do so; but the matter was not brought to the test. in the following particulars :

John CAURCHILL SIKES. 1. He says that the above phrase “is perfectly 13, Wolverton Gardens, Hammersmith, W.

reproduced in German, where it appears as 'Wie

ein Blitzstrahl aus blauem Aether." Blitzstrahl The Law Times for April 15 has an article on the royal veto, in which it is stated (vol. xciv. is not a bolt or thunderbolt, but a flash of lightp. 552):

ning.

2. “Come un fulmine a ciel sereno” in like “ The latter phrase (" Le Roy s'avisera "] was used by manner, does not represent the phrase: it is simply William Ill, on several occasions, notably in the cases of the Place Bill and the Triennial Parliaments Bill. It

6 like thunder in a clear sky." was last used by a British Sovereign in 1707, when 3. The French le or la foudre cannot refer Queen Anne exercised her right of veto on a Scotch “merely to the violence or rapidity of a thunderMilitia Bill,”

Q. V.

bolt,” but simply to thunder.

4. It seems a pity to perpetuate the old error of “ CROW

Rook” (8th S. iii. 367, 396). confusing an aërolite, which may fall from the blue, -It may interest PROF. ATTWELL and others to with a thunderbolt, wbich was a term invented know of a case of crows congregating. Some years before the nature of lightning was known, and back I had the shooting over Wanstead Park, and wbich has no existence in modern science. one day my keeper informed me that a flock of But the question remains whether the usual crows was in the habit of coming in of an evening phenomena of a thunderstorm has ever been known to roost. Hardly crediting the statement, i to take place in the blue. Arago, in his famous arranged to lie up with him the next evening treatise . Sur le Tonnerre' (Annuaire du Bureau under the trees, and await their advent. Silently, des Longitudes, 1837), discusses the subject, but and in the dusk of the evening, the wary con- leaves it pretty much as be found it. tiogent sought their accustomed places, and we According to Seneca, thunder sometimes growls were fortunate in bringing three to the ground, in a cloudless sky. Anaximander makes a similar as undeniable evidence of the fact that this was a observation. Lucretius, on the contrary, denies colody of crows-not rooks. How many such that thunder is ever heard when the sky is serene. packs of wolves may be passing as sheep in other According to him, it is engendered only in the localities is open to conjecture ; but certain it is midst of dense, piled-up clouds ; it is never formed that only a shrewd observer would be able to note in a clear sky, or a sky just veiled with cloud. the difference, unless assisted by some lucky Among modern observers, Senebier, in the accident.

Journal de Physique, refers to thunder under a Though the rook is usually so called in the south clear sky as an admitted fact. · Volney, being at of England, it is curious to note that, when it is Pontchartrain, some distance from Versailles, à question of preserving the newly-sown wheat July 13, 1788, at 6 A.M., heard thunder under a from bis depredations, he is often (perbaps clear sky, and it was not till 7.15 P.M. that a cloud usually) called a crow. “Scaring crows

is a well- appeared in the south-west, soon after which the known occupation in Essex, and here I have noted whole sky became covered, and was succeeded by the expression “crow-keeper.” There is the less a heavy shower of bail. In all such cases, from reason for this, as the crow is no damager of crops. the difficulty of determining the direction of sound,

HOLCOMBE INGLEBY. the thunder most probably proceeded from a cloud Heacham Hall, Norfolk.

which was out of sight or unnoticed.

Thunder without visible lightning may someWROTA Money (gib S. iii. 366).—This subject times be heard, as happened to me in September, is to be treated of in 'Bygone Warwickshire' (a 1857, while residing in a small village in Rbenish work now being published by snbscription). Accord- Prussia. The weather had been remarkably warm, ing to the prospectus, and judging from the names dry, and cloudlese, the temperature ranging from of the contributors to its pages, I should think the 850 to 90° and even 95° F. in the shade. One day matter will be very ably dealt with.

I walked into the woods that cover the low hills J. BAGNALL.

surrounding the village. While sitting at the foot Water Orton.

of a tree reading, I heard what seemed to be the Bailey's, 'Dictiorary,' 1766, quotes "Green irregular firing of musketry, as if a line of soldiers Silver, a duty of one halfpenny paid annually in had discharged their muskets in succession. The Writtle, Eseex, to the Lord of the Manor." This fact that soldiers were skirmishing in the neigh

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bourhood seemed to account for the phenomenon. Pedigrees';

Burke's Heraldic Illustrations But presently the supposed firing was heard Baines's 'History of the County of Lancaster, exactly overhead, and on looking upwards a cloud vol. iii.; Earwaker's 'Local Gleanings,' vol. ü.; was observed, of no very great extent, in which a Ashmole's ' Antiquities of Berkshire,' vol. iü,; series of rapid explosions was taking place ; the Wotton's ‘English Baronetage,' vol. iii.; Betham's cloud seemed to float alone in the sky, which was · Baronetage,' vol. ii. ; and Burke's 'Extinct bright and clear everywhere else. This cloud was Baronetcies.

H. evidently discharging into another cloud above it;

ARABELLA FERMOR (8th S. iii. 128, 212, 271).but the lightning was too faint to be seen, or was

MR. CORNELIUS HALLEN mentions at the last extinguished by the bright sunshine. The explosions continued for about five minutes, then reference that he has not seen Miss A. M. Sharp's ceased for a short time and began again. The

'History of Ufton Court, published by Mr.

Elliot Stock. This lady states (p. 119) that the cloud gradually disappeared, the afternoon was

fourth Francis Perkins married Arabella Fermor, bright, and the fine weather continued for some days longer ; but transient thunderstorms had the daughter of Henry Fermor, of Tasmore occurred in the neighbourhood.

Oxfordshire, in 1715. Their son Francis was born In regions subject to earthquakes the subter- in 1716, and their daughter Arabella died in 1723, ranean rumblings are sometimes mistaken for so that there must be an error in the statement thunder. Thus, in the last century, there was an

quoted by MR. HALLEN from two pedigrees that earthquake at Santa Fe de Bogata, and a thunder. Arabella's marriage took place in 1734. storm mass (la missa del ruido) was instituted at Miss Sharp (pp. 210, 211) as stating that Francis

In the appendix the Ufton register is quoted by the cathedral on the anniversary of the earthquake, Perkins was buried April 9, 1736, and his wife on to commemorate the rumblings, which were mistaken for thunder.

March 9, 1737.
C. Tomlinson, F.R.S.

Od p. 211 there is also the Highgate, N.

following “extract from register and notes written

by F. Madew, priest at Ufton Court": “Mrs In 7th S. iv. 333, MR. W. F. Hobson has a Perkins, alias Arrabella Fermer, died Feb 19:, reference to Homer's 'Od.,' v. 102 899., from which 1737." MR. HALLEN quotes the last entry with he omits the letter of the book, Y. A still closer the date 1736. This was no doubt Old Style. reference is to Vergil, ' Æo.,' ix. 630,

John RANDALL.
Audiit et cæli genitor de parte serena
Intonuit lævum,

“CURATION” (8th S. iii. 308). — Blackstone

writes :which is very similar to the Italian in Dr. Chance's note.

“The guardian with us performs the office both of

the tu!or and curator of the Roman laws, the former of In the recent text of Homer MR. Hobsor's which had the charge of the maintenance and education reference gains a little in aptness, as there is an of the minor, the latter the care of his fortune; or, omission of the line which begins úvóbevék according to the language of the Court of Chancery, the vedéwv, which is put in brackets, as pot genuine.

tutor was the committee of the person, the curator the ED. MARSHALL.

committee of the estate. But this office was frequently

united in the civil law, as it is always in our law with While giving instances of this phrase from regard to minors, although as to lunatics and idiots it is foreign languages, Dr. Chance might have pointed commonly kept distinct.”—(Book i. chap. xvii

. $ 1.) out its utter absurdity. As a man of science he It is a term which was in early use in this sense : knows that a flash of lightning, vulgarly called a "Furiosæ matris curatio ad filium pertinet," Ulp. thunderbolt, cannot possibly proceed from a cloud. 'Dig.' lib. xxvii. tit. x. I. 4;" Furiosi quoqe et less sky. Metaphors are very useful in their prodigi, licet majores viginti quinque annis sint, proper place, but they must have some basis of tamen in curatione sunt agaatorum ex lege duofact to start from.

J. Dixon. decim tabulorum," Justin. Inst.,' lib. i. tit. xxiii.

"De Curatoribus," § 3. The remaining chapters of TAE STANDISA FAMILY (8th S. iii. 408).-T. B. the first book relate to various matters in reference will find a full account of the House of Standish to the “Curatores."

ED. MARSHALL of Duxbury in Sir B. Burke's ‘Landed Gentry,' “ Curator" is a legal term for a person appointed 1886, vol. ii.

E. WALFORD, M.A. Ventnor.

to act as guardian, and “curation” is consequently guardianship.

A. COLLINGWOOD LEE. In G. W. Marshall's 'Genealogist's Guide' the following works are referred to for information

This must mean trustee- or guardianship. A respecting families of the above name : Burke's curator bas other offices than that of taking care of * Royal Families' (London, 1851), vol. ii. ; Burke's

the objects in a museum. See any good dictionary. Commoners,' vol. ii.; Burke's 'Landed Gentry';

Sr. Switals. Chetham Society publications, vols. lxxxi., lxxxii., ENFIELD AND EDMONTON (Ath S. iii. 347).—Dr. lxxxviii., xcviii., xcix.; Foster's 'Lancashire Robinson's ' History of Enfield' is considered the

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best. There are also books by Ford and Tuft. Harris Nicolas, great advance bas been made in our The Palace at Enfield, where Queen Elizabeth knowledge of the poet's life, and many rew poems have lived, was pulled down in the last century, and been brought to light. These things have been iccorthe materials sold. The iron fireback may very

porated in the new and authoritative edition Mr. Aitken

now supplies. A more desirable edition, so far as the probably come from this palace. The “King's Southern reader is concerned, needs not be desired. House," another palace, used by Edward VI., was In addition to & biography which does "nothing pulled down in 1608. Old and New London extenuate, nor set down aught in malice,” we have at (Cassell) gives some particulars of Edmonton, and stances in which it was written, and the terms strange to

the foot of each poom an explanation of the circumCassell's Greater London' has two chapters on

an Englishman are explained at the foot of the page, Enfield and Enfield Chase.

instead of compelling the reader to turn to a glossary, B. FLORENCE SCARLETT. perhaps in another volume. A glossary is also supplied, The Mercurius Politicus, with other Civil War to the altered taste of the times, are traceable. With

as is an index of first liner. A few omissions, attributable Dowspapers of the year 1659, contains a notice of these few will find fault. an affray between the soldiers and the populace in Enfield Chase, to prevent the land from being St. Bartholomer's Hospital Reports. Edited by W. 8. taken from the public for the erection of houses.

Churcb, M.D., and 'W. J. Walebam, F.R.C.S. Vol.

XXVIII., 1892. (Smith, Elder & Co.) There was published in 1701 The Case of the

“It is possible that the vast magnitude of medical Earl of Stamford,' as to wood cut in Enfield Cbase, literature is an advantage for which we should be thankfol., Lond., as also a subsequent Consideration of ful, for it furnishes an upanswerable excuse for leaving the Case 'in the same year, fol. There is a notice of it unread.” Fortunately this sentence does not occur on a haunted house in Enfield in ' N. & Q.,' 4th S. xi. Reports might be added to the vast magnitude, and the

an early page, or the present volume of Hospital 74. Weever's · Funeral Monuments, Lond., 1631, many useful suggestions scattered throughout its pages has, at p. 534, a notice of Enfield and of Edmon- left unread. Many of the articles are both interesting ton.

ED. MARSHALL. and instructive, but none is more suggestive than that

by Dr. T. Claye Sbaw, on 'Surgery and Insanity,' which There is no really good work dealing at all raises the hope that the near future will produce new adequately with these interesting districts. Doubt- and more successful measures of " ministering to the less your correspondent is acquainted with the mind diseased.” brief accounts in Camden, Lysons, Gough, Hugh Women Adventurers. Edited by Ménie Muriel Dowie. Bon, and Norris Brewer. The seat of the Cecils

(Fisher Unwin.) was at Elsinge Hall, or the Worcesters, as it was This new volume of the “ Adventure Series" has the better known. Judge Jeffreys resided at Durants. advantage of being edited by Miss Dowie, the author of

Chas. Jas. FÈRET. the spirited 'A Girl in the Karpathians.' In selecting

the lives of Madame Velazquez, Hannah Snell (a name

familiar to readers of 'N. & Q.,' see 816 8. ii. 88, 171, Miscellaneous.

455), Mary Anne Talbot, and Mrs. Christian Davies as

examples of women adventurers (why not adventuresses ?), NOTES ON BOOKS, &c.

she has furnished material for some amusement and Ivanhoe. By Sir Walter Scott, Bart. With Notes by interest. We are not asked to take these narratives au Andrew Lang. (Nimmo.)

grund sérieux. They are rather sketches of the past, These are, perhaps, the most wholly satisfactory illustrating

what could have been done, and may be done volumes of this delightful edition of Scott. M. Lalauze again, by women who, from motives which we do not has unparalleled grace, vivacity, and distinction as

propose to analyze, choose to put off the woman and act designer and etcher, and the twelve illustrations he the man. The preface is smart, and well worth reading. supplies to this the most generally popular of Scott's novels, and that, moreover, in which he first laid the Louis Agassiz : his Life and Work. By Charles Freaction wholly in England and introduced no Scottish

derick Holder, LL.D. (Putnam's Sons.) character, are exquisite. It is hypercriticism to say that The biography before us forms the second of the they are, perhaps, too sensuous, seductive-eighteenth “ Leaders in Science " series, and the choice of the great century, in fact. The rude life of the nobleman, Nor. Swiss naturalist as its subject appears to us to be very man or Saxon, is faithfully shown, and fair women such judicious. It is now nearly twenty years ago that as M. Lalauze exhibits in Rebecca and Rowena were Agassiz closed his earthly career, yet we feel more and confined to do age. Mr. Lang, in his highly interesting more the appropriateness of the words spoken in the introduction, defends Scott against the charge of false Californian Academy of Sciences when his death was heraldry brought against him in connexion with this announced, " Agassiz still lives."

The memory of a novel. He also quotes some whimsically ill-natured and noble life devoted to science and to humanity will never incompetent strictures from "my grandmother's review" pass away, and Dr. Holder tells the story of that life -the British. Both preface and notes are excellent. in a way which sets forth its example in a very interestAmong the latter the account of Lockeley's shooting ing and appreciative manner. It belongs to two contifeats and the defence of his cleaving the rush are worthy nents, for while the first part of it was spent, and a high of special attention.

reputation acquired, in Europe, circumstances led to his

adoption of America as a home in the latter part, and The Poelical Works of Robert Burns. Edited, with in that also his scientific expeditions and studies were of

Memoir, by George A. Aitken. 3 vols. (Bell & Sons.) the highest value. Even to touch upon them in detail Since the first Aldine edition of Burns was issued, more here would be impossible, relating as they do to all dethan half a century ago, under the editorsbip of Sir partments of natural history, whilst those of ichthyology and glacial action were his specialities. Agassiz was not of life in the camp. 'An Artist in Japan' contains some a believer in what is commonly called the Darwinian pleasing sketches. Amusing enough is his gossip, and theory of evolution of species; to use his own words in his illustrations are delightful. "The Birds that we see speaking of the geological record, "we have no right to are familiar to fow Englishmen.- A Discourse of Rare infer the disappearance of types because their absence Booke,' which appears in Macmillan's, deals interestingly, disproves some favourite theory; and...... there is no but 'not very comprehensively, with an inexhaustible evidence of a direct descent of later from earlier species subject. The writer speaks of the comedies and rhymes in the geological succession of animals.” Dr. Holder's of Messer Partenio Etiro Pietro Aretino as running up book, which is elegantly printed and almost profusely in Gamba “the whole gamut" from assai raro to illustrated, cannot fail to be considered one of the most rarissimo." Somewhat curiously, one of these very interesting of a useful series, the next volume of which comedies, in a Trautz-Bauzonnet binding, appears in s will be devoted to the life and work of the great scientific this month's catalogue for a few shillings. Å Historical traveller Alexander von Humboldt,

Parallel;' though readable, is political. Ste. Anne des THE Journal of the Ex-Libris Society has a paper by worship. -Lady Mary Wortley Montagu' is the subject

Deux Mondes' deals with a well-known object of Breton Mr.

William Bolton on The Heraldry and Book-plates of a sprightly paper in Temple Bar, in which are also · Tbe of Some British Poets,' consisting of Sir Walter Scott, Eye of the Baltic'and an account of The Writings of the Earl of Dorset, Robert Bloomfield, and Robert Burns. Joseph Glanvill.' - In the Gentleman's we have a collection One is surprised to find Bloomfield with a book.plate. of Lullabies,' an interesting subject, Mr. Garnet Smith That of Lord Dorset is reproduced. Mr. Arthur Vicars deals with The Letters of Gustave Flaubert.' Mr. Wills, (Ulster) continues bis ‘Book-Pile Ex-Libris.' The num. writing on Our Pedigrees,' has little to say that will ber is excellent.

reward the herald or the genealogist.- Mr. Lang is The most interesting article in the Fortnightly is that amusing and edifying, after his wont, in Longman's. of M. Ange Galdemar on The Comédie-Française in Mr. Rodway describes 'Low Orchids climbed the Trees." London.' In contains records of conversations with M. -Under the title 'The Romance of Modern London the Got and Mlle. Reichenberg, and numerous extracts from English Illustrated gives some pictures of railway stations. the somewhat matter-of-fact and official diary of the The Red Cross Hall' is a stimulating account. 'Bird Life former. One is surprised to see how little is said con in Summer' is pleasing. Some High Notes,' in the Corn.

In the New cerning the banquet at the Crystal Palace, which, how. hill, describes mountain experiences. ever oblivious the company may choose to be, is one of Forest' is pleasantly descriptive.-Belgravia, the Idler, the most conspicuous and important events in its annals. and All the Year Round have pleasantly varied contente. To the memory of John Addington Symonds Mr. A. R.

MESSRS. CASSELL'S reprint of Thornbury and Walford's Cluer pays a very warm tribute. Mr. P. S. MacColl Old and Nexo London approaches completion, a portion scolds the Royal Academy, is exceedingly severe upon of the general index being given in Part LXIX. The the older painters, would furnish the cheeks of Sir John other portion remains in Chiswick and the neighbourMillais with a blush, and praises Mr. Whistler as one hood, and gives pictures of Hogarth's house, Chiswick who " is on the side of the old masters” and “practises House in 1763, Chiswick Church in 1760, &c.— The Storehis art with the breeding and restraint of an artist.” house of Information, Part XXIX., carries the alphabet Mr. Stanley's ' African Legends' will have deep interest to “Horne," and gives a physical map of Asia, for the folk-lorist. Tbe legend concerning the Moon and the Toad gives a quaint account of the origin of

In The Two Salons' Mrs. Pennell expresses A SELECTION of Irish book-plates, from the collection views which have much in common with those of Mr. of the late Sir Bernard Burke, will be published by subMacColl. Prof. Lodge supplies an excellent paper on scription by Mitchell & Hughes. It will be annotated • The Interstellar Ecber. -Under the title of "Rare by Mr. H. Farnbam Burke (Somerset Herald), and Dr. Books and their Prices,' Mr. W. Roberts, editor of the Howard (Maltravers Herald Extraordinary). Bookworm, analyzes, in the Nineteenth century, the recent great book sales, and brings prominently forward some startling results. "An Impossible Correspondence,'

Notices to Correspondents. by R. F. Murray, is an amusing skit upon modern maga. zine editors. It consists of imaginary letters from the We must call special allention to the following notices : editor of the Whitechapel Magazine, declining proffered poems of Chaucer, Shakspeare, Milton, Dryden, Blake, address of the sender, not necessarily for publication, but

On all communications must be written the name and Pope. Sbelley, Keats, the Brownings, Coleridge, &c. Mr. Charles L. Eastlake sends a capital account of The

88 & guarantee of good faith. Poldi-Pezzoli Collection at Milan' Mr. Henniker Heaton

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately. arraigns somewhat strongly the Post Office, which be To secure insertion of communications correspondents charges with plundering and blundering. Sir Herbert must observe the following rule. Let each note, query, Maxwell sends a deeply interesting paper on “The or reply be written on a separate slip of paper, with the Craving for Fiction, and Mr. A. P. Sinnett answers signature of the writer and such address as he wishes to Prof. Max Müller on · Esoteric Buddhism.'—The Ceno appear. Correspondents who repeat queries are requested tury Magazine gives an illustrated account of The Juno to head the second communication "Duplicate." of Argos' discovered last year. Caught on a Lee Shore'

H. WALLER, -Received, supplies an exciting account of adventure on the coast of Florida. The accompanying designs are very spirited, Under the head of Notable Women,' Mr. Edmund Editorial Communications should be addressed to " The Gosse deals very sympathetically with Christina Rossetti. Editor of "Notes and Queries '”—Advertisements and "With Tolstoy in the Russian Famine'

gives some striking Business Letters to “ The Publisher"--at the Office, reproductions of photographs. 'In Cowboy-Land' may Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, E.C. also be read.- Scribner's opens with. Life in a Logging We beg leave to state that we decline to return com. Camp. Many very striking pictures of felling and munications which, for any reason, we do not print ; and carrying logs are given. Even more striking are those to this rule we can make no exception.

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NOTIOR.

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