The Horse and His Rider

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1861 - 226 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 105 - Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly," death itself awakes ? Can'st thou, O partial sleep ! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude ; And in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 213 - And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept; and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof; and the rib, which the LORD God had taken from man, made he a woman and brought her unto the man.
Page 88 - Network: anything reticulated or decussated, at equal distances with interstices between the intersections.
Page 1 - Life and Times of Titian, with some Account of his Family, chiefly from new and unpublished records. With Portrait and Illustrations. 2 vols. 8vo. 42s. CUMMING (R. GORDON). Five Years of a Hunter's Life in the Far Interior of South Africa.
Page 5 - Tabulae Curiales ; or, Tables of the Superior Courts of Westminster Hall. Showing the Judges who sat in them from 1066 to 1864 ; with the Attorney and Solicitor Generals of each reign.
Page 223 - More Worlds than One. The Creed of the Philosopher and the Hope of the Christian.
Page 20 - History of Rome. From the Earliest Times to the Establishment of the Empire. With the History of Literature and Art.
Page 10 - KING'S (REV. SW) Italian Valleys of the Alps ; a Tour through all the Romantic and less-frequented "Vals" of Northern Piedmont. Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 18s. (REV. CW) Antique Gems ; their Origin, Use, and Value, as Interpreters of Ancient History, and as illustrative of Ancient Art.
Page 175 - Smith, as a horseman and rider to hounds, but shall lay before my readers that of all the sporting world, at least all who have seen him in the field ; which is, that taking him from the first day's hunting of the season to the last, place him on the best horse in his stable or on the worst, he is sure to be with his hounds, and close to them too. In fact, he has undoubtedly proved himself the best and hardest rider England ever saw, and it would be vain in any man to dispute his title to that character.

Bibliographic information