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TABLE No. 3
INCREASES AND DECREASES IN WAGES AND WORKING HOURS.

The purpose of this table is to show in the most concrete form possible, the general trend of working time and wages during the twelve months covered by the Industrial Chronology.

Only 54 establishments report changes in either of the above respects, and ten of these were reductions, all in working time only; in four instances the week's work was reduced from six to three days; in three establishments the reduction was from six to five days; in two others night work was discontinued and a return made to the ordinary standard of a day's work; and in one the regular working time was reduced from twelve to ten hours per day.

There are 44 increases recorded on the table, 16 of which have reference to wages, and 28 to working time. in wage increases secured, is, on a percentage basis, from 5 to 20 per cent; two establishments report increases of 15 cents and 25 cents per day respectively in their wage rates.

The increases of working time are with a few exceptions, a return to full time after having been on short hours in many instances since the panic of 1907-08. Several establishments report the employment of a separate force for night work, and others, for part of the night only. Although resumption of work after having been shut down for a more or less extended period are not strictly speaking, cases of “increase in working time, there are still several instances of that character which will be noticed on the table. These establishments, like those that were compelled to resort to half-time, succumbed to the pressure of the money panic, and did not reopen until the date given on the table.

The range

INDUSTRIAL CHRONOLOGY.

TABLE No. 3. Increase or Decrease in Wages and Working Hours, from October 1, 1909, to September 30, 1910.

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Empire Steel and Iron Co. Mining iron ore. .
Harry A. Scheurman.

Piano stools.
Acme Underwear Co..

Underwear.
C. Pardee Steel Works.

Steel ingots.
International Pump Co.

Pumps
Marshall Thread Works.

Thread.
Agasote Millboard Co.

Millboards.
New Jersey China Co.

Chinaware.
Miesch Mfg. Co.

Silk goods.
Rogers Locomotive Co.

Locomotives
Lambertville Spoke Works. Spokes.
Princeton Worsted Co.

Worsted goods.
Structural Ironworkers.

Structural ironwork
Coal trimmers.

Trimming coal.
Coal handlers.

Handling coal.
Trolley employes.

Operating trolleys.
Lincoln Structural Iron Co. Iron and steal.
United & Globe Rubber Mfg.Co Rubber goods.
Switchtenders.

Teuding switches
Morris County Machine Co. Machinery:
Pennsylvania R. R. Carshops. Car repairing.
E. J. Ross Mfg. Co.

Silk goods.
Edison Portland Cement Co. Cement..
Whitall, Tatum Co

Glass goods.
Rendrock Powder Co.

High explosives. J. A. Roebling's Sons & Co. Wire screens

Trenton
Trenton
Paterson.
Paterson.
Lambertville.
Trenton
Boonton..
Perth Amboy.
Perth Amboy.
Red Bank.
Rockaway.
Trenton

Oct.

31
Nov. 2
Nov. 23

11

29
Dec. 29
Jan.

1

+++++++++++

Ten (10%) per cent. increase in wages.
Reo pened on full time. Had been closed.
Employment of a night shift, three evenings per week.
To full time; had been working half time.
To full time; had been working three quarter time.
Five (5%) and ten (10%) per cent. increase; according to wages

received.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Employment of a night shift, five evenings per week.
To full time; had been working five days a week.
Discontinued working nights.
Ten (10%) per cent. increase in wages.
Twenty (20c.) cents increase in daily wages.
Five (5%) per cent. increase in wages.
Ten (10%) per cent increase in wages.
Employment of a night shift, three evenings per week.
Employment of a night force, four evenings per week until 10

o'clock.
Twenty-five (25c.) cents increase in daily wages.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Employment of night shift.
To half time. Had been working full time.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
To full time. Had been working half time.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Employment of a night shift, five evenings per week until 10

o'clock.

Jan.
Jan.
Jal.
Jan.
Jan.

8
12
14

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INDUSTRIAL CHRONOLOGY.

TABLE No. 3.-Continued. Increase or Decrease in Wages and Working Hours, from October 1, 1909, to September 30, 1910.

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Central R. R. of N. J.

Firemen

Elizabeth.
Clayworkers.

Clay handling.

Perth Amboy
Alpha Portland Cement Co. Cement.

Alpha.
Union Mill Paper Co.

Paper.

Lambertville.
Central R. R. of N. J.

Gatetending.

Elizabeth.
Machinists.

Machinery.

Dover.
Central R. R. of N. J.

Station employes. Elizabeth
Standard Oil Co.

Oil refining

Bayonne.
Vulcanite Portland Cement Co. .Cement.

Phillipsburg.
Hackettstown Hat Works.

Hats..

Hackettstown.
Singleton Silk Co...

Silk goods.

Dover.
Pennsylvania R. R. Co.

Trainmen.

W. of Jersey City
Hall Printing Press Co.

Printing presses.

Dunellen.
Manhattan Silk Co.

Silk goods.

Paterson.
Washington Casket Co.

Caskets.

Washington.
Molders.

Molding.

Newark
Otis Elevator Co.

Elevators.

Newark.
Painters.

Painting..

Perth Amboy.
Ironworkers.

Structural ironwork. Newark.
United States Rubber Co.

Rubber novelties. New Brunswick.
American Brake Shoe Co.

Brake Shoes,

Mahwah
Moulders.

Moulding.

Elizabeth.
Hall Signal Co.

Railroad equipment.. Garwood.
Philadelphia Watch Case Co. Watch cases. .

Riverside.
Bound Brook Woolen Co. Woolen goods

Bound Brook.
American Rice Food Co.

Breakfast foods.

Matawan
Argo Mills Co..

Cotton yarns & hosiery. Gloucester.
Stockton Rubber Co.

Rubber goods. . Stockton.

June
June

+++111+1++++++++++++++1++!

15.
April 1.
April 7
April 17
April 27
May

2

2
May 17
May 25

6

6
June 7
June 10
June 14
June 13
June 18
June 19.
June 30
July

9.
July 12

July 14
+ July 18.

Aug. 27
Aug. 30.
Aug. 30.
Sept. 14
Sept. 26.
Sept. 27

To ten hours per day. Had been working twelve.
Ten (10%) per cent. increase in wages.
Seven (7%) per cent. increase in wages:
To five days per week. Had been working six.
Fifteen (15c.) cents increase in daily wages.
Ten (10%) per cent. increase in wages.
Six (6%) per cent. increase in wages.
Six (6%) per cent. increase in wages.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
To five days per week. Had been working five and one-half.
Three (3c.) cents increase an hour in wages.
Ten (10%) per cent. increase in wages.
To three days per week. Had been working six.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Increase in wages of 25c. per day.
Increase in wages of 25c. per day.
Wages increased three (3c.) cents per hour.
Fifty (50c.) cents per day increase in wages.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
To five days per week. Had been working six.
Wages increased twenty-five (25c.) cents per day.
Discontinued night work.
To three days per week; had been working six.
To three days per week. Had been working six.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.
Reopened on full time. Had been closed.

TABLE No. 4.
NEW MANUFACTURING PLANTS ESTABLISHED AND OLD

ONES ENLARGED.

This table shows for the year the number of new manufacturing establishments started, and the number of old plants that were, to a greater or less extent, enlarged during the year. The names of firms concerned, character of the industry carried on, cost of the improvement or new construction, and location of the works, are given in each instance.

The total amount invested in factory construction and improvements during the twelve months, is $5,495,755, of which $3,230,000 was for entirely new plants, and $2,265,755 for enlarging the capacity of those already in existence.

The industries showing the largest number of new plants are "sheet metal goods," “brass goods-castings and sheet,” “leather," "machinery,” “car building,” “fur hats,” and “printing.'

Thirty-three other distinct industries are represented in the year's record of factory construction by one new plant each.

The number of new plants erected in various cities and towns, with the total cost of construction and equipment, is as follows:

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The above table shows Newark away in the lead of all other municipalities, with a total of thirty-three new factory buildings at an aggregate cost of $1,290,450. Next in importance is Jersey City, with fifteen new plants representing an investment of $773,500.

Practically all the industrial expansion of the year represented by new factory buildings, is found in the middle counties of the State. With the exception of Trenton and Camden, but little industrial progress is shown in cities and towns of the southern counties, and none at all in the extreme northern counties.

The outlay for manufacturing expansion—new buildings and improvements to old ones, shown by months as follows:

October
November
December
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September

$606,000.00 399,053.00 604,400.00 415,963.00 326,750.00 850,327.00 434,703.00 179,160.00 561,750.00 165,300.00 185,300.00 767,049.00

$5,495,755.00

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