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disturbances occurred between the strikers and others who had taken their places and a number of arrests were made by the police. The strike was unsuccessful, the laborers who took part in it having been replaced by others within a few days. Wage loss estimated at $240.

SEPTEMBER 7.--Four hundred men's garment workers, members of Garment Workers Local Union No. 24, of Newark, demanded a 10 per cent increase in prices of certain kinds of work, and went on strike to enforce the same. A new price list providing for the 10 per cent advance was submitted to the employing firms, and the same was agreed to by six of the leading concerns. One hundred and fifty of the operatives thereupon returned to work, having been idle only one half day. Other manufacturers and contractors agreed to pay the advance demanded and about six days after the commencement of the strike, the operatives all had returned to work. The strike was completely successful; wage loss estimated at $800.

SEPTEMBER 15.—Thirty-five men employed by Oscar Schmidt, manufacturer of musical instruments at Jersey City, struck to enforce a demand they had made for the payment of higher piece prices in one department of the works. The strike lasted three weeks, and resulted in the men receiving the increase demanded. Wage loss, $1,280.

SEPTEMBER 21.-Twenty-five glaziers employed by Louis Max at Jersey City, quit work on orders from a committee of New York glaziers who were on strike. The Jersey City men had no grievances of their own to complain of, but feared to lose their standing with the union by disobeying the order to strike. The police reserve had to be called on to protect truckmen while unloading a consignment of glass at the Jersey City establishment. About one week later the New York strike having been settled, the Jersey City men returned to work. Wage loss estimated at $300.

TABLE No. 7.

STRIKES.

The table that follows is a summary of the essential facts relating to the strikes as set forth in the preceding notes. The date of occurrence, character of business, location of works, with purpose for which the strike was undertaken, are all shown, with the results so far as these could be ascertained, or where a definite conclusion was reached. The causes of strikes, or the various interests sought to be advanced by the workmen who were engaged in them, together with the number chargeable to each cause or purpose, are shown in the following table :

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Number of Strikes.

4

4

2

2
2

2

1

1

CAUSE OF STRIKES.
Against reduction in wages.
Against "open shop".
For recognition of union..
Increase of wages and reduction of working time.
For uniform wage rate....
To force discharge of foreman.
Increase of wages and recognition of union.
For union wage scale....
To enforce union rules..
For change in shop rules and recognition of union.
Increase of wages and full Saturday holiday.
Because of delay in payment of wages...
Against change from semi-monthly to monthly pay day.
Increase in working time and wages.
To secure pay for overtime.
For reduction in working hours.
Against change of pay day.

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Total

number

of strikes..

112

The total number of strikes that took place during the twelve months covered by the record is, as shown by the above figures, 112; for the preceding twelve months the number recorded was 93; the increase in the number of strikes for the present year is therefore 19, or a little more than 20 per cent.

Almost one half of the total number were for wage increases, and the causes next in numerical importance were—sympathy with other strikers; against working with non-union men; against members of other unions; for the reinstatement of favored foremen who had been discharged; and to prevent the discharge of fellow workmen.

Making a broad classification of the strikes of the year by character of occupation, the record shows 67, or 59.8 per cent of the total number occurred among men and women employed in factories and workshops; 16, or 14.3 per cent in the building trades; II, or 9.9 per cent in tunnel and sewer construction, street improvement, etc. ; 6, or 5.3 per cent in transportation; 3, or 2.6 per cent in electric power houses or among linemen, and 9, or 8.0 per cent in a number of unclassified occupations.

The total number of wage earners involved in the strikes was 14,044; of these 12,088 were men, and 1,956 women. The total amount of wage loss involved in the strikes was $439,088.

By localities the strikes were divided over the State as shown in the following table:

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The chronological record of strikes for the twelve months ending September 30, 1910, is as follows:

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The large number of strikes reported for April is accounted for by the fact that working agreements, in the building trades particularly, whether these extend over one or more years, usually have April ist, as their date of commencement, and such strikes as may follow disagreement over the terms advanced by either side as the basis of renewal, are almost certain to be commenced during that month. Another reason is that outdoor laborers who eagerly accept employment at any remuneration offered during the winter months, often find that fairer wages cannot be obtained without a strike when these have passed

over.

Strikes and Lockouts, from October 1, 1909, to September 30, 1910.

When Strike
or Lockout
Occurred.

Business or Occupation in Which

Strike or Lockout Occurred.

Location in Which
Strike or Lockout

Occurred.

Cause or Object of Strike or Lockout.

Result of Strike

Successful,
Unsuccessful,
Partly successful.

October 15. Manufactory of chemicals.

Perth Amboy.
October 23. Laborers (railroad).

Elizabeth.
October 27. Carpenters

Dover.
January 15. Hatters.

Orange Valley and

Newark.
October 23. Cigar factory.

New Brunswick.
November 2. Foundry.

Burlington..
November 18 Building trades employes.

Weehawken.
November 18. Iron workers.

Newark.
November 24. Window and house cleaning.

Jersey City.
November 27. Shirtwaist making

Newark.
November 27. Painters.

Passaic.
November 29. Peach basket making.

Califon.
December 2. Teamsters employed by tea company. Jersey City.
December 2. Silk manufactory..

West New York.
December 9. Laborers (sewer)..

Bordentown.
December 13. Silk manufactory.

Hackensack..
December 21. Carpenters.

Belmar, Spring Lake

and Sea Girt.
December 27. Bricklayers, masons, plasters & helpers Newark.
December 30. Silk manufactory.

Paterson.
January 6 3. Silk manufactory.

Paterson.
January 14. Pottery.

Trenton.
January 15. Clothing factory.

Red Bank
January 19. Shoe manufactory.

Newark.
January 19. Building trades employes.

South Orange.
January 21. Metal bed factory.

Jersey City.
January 24. Clay working.

South River.

Against a reduction in piece prices.

Successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
Against working with non-union men.

Successful.
Employers declared' "open shop, and refused to
use union labels on their goods..

Partly successful.
For increase in piece prices, and because of objection to
stock furnished for work.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Successful.
Against working with non-union men.
Against “open shop'

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages and recognition of the union. Partly successful.
In sympathy with strike in New York city..

Unsuccessful.
For union wage scale.

Successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
Against the discharge of three of their fellow workmen. Successful.
For increase in piece prices.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
Against decrease in wages

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages. .

Successful.
To force contractor to abide by rules of union.

Successful.
For change in mill regulations, and recognition of
union.

Partly successful.
For increase in wagęs.

Successful.
To enforce union rules

Unsuccessful
In sympathy with fellow employes who had been dis-
charged..

Unsuccessful.
Against reduction in wages.

Successful.
For discharge of workmen from New York, and recog-
nition of local union......

Successful.
For reinstatement of discharged foreman..

Unsuccessful. To make the plant a "closed shop," and for recognition of union.

Unsuccessful.

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March
March

Elizabeth.
Paterson. .

March
March
March
March
March
March
March

Trenton.
Perth Amboy.
Kearny.
Bayonne.
Perth Amboy.
Westwood
Trenton.

For increase in wages.

Partly successful. For increase in wages, and payment of same in cash, instead of check.

Successful.
For increase in wages, and no work on Saturday Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages..

Unsuccessful.
Because of trouble between rival unions.

Successful.
For increase in piece prices, and for having prices marked
on tickets.

Successful.
For reinstatement of discharged foreman.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages..

Unsuccessful.
Because wages had not been paid for six weeks. Successful.
In sympathy with New York boiler makers on strike Unsuccessful.
For recognition of union.

Unsuccessful.
Against changing pay periods from semi-monthly to
monthly.

Successful.
Disagreement between unions

Unsuccessful.
For the discharge of non-union workmen, and recogni

tion of union.
For ten hour work day, and increase in wages.

Successful.
Against discharge of an employe..

Unsuccessful.
Against working with members of a New York union. Successful.
Against the discharge of a stableman..

Successful.
For pay for overtime work..

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages..

Unsuccessful.
Because workmen from New York refused to join local
union....

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Successful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
Against working with non-union men.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages, and reduction in working time. Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
Against the employment of non-union men.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages. .

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages..

Partly successful.
Disagreement between unions.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful.
For increase in wages.

Partly successful.
For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful. For increase in wages.

Unsuccessful. For increase in piece prices.

Partly successful.

7. Plasterers.
9. Silk Manufactory
9. Street railway.
11. Glass making.
19. Building trades employes.
22. Drivers for meat packing company.
24. Terra Cotta works
25. Laborers.
27. Building trades employes.
28. Nursery plants.
28. Paper Mill.
29. Silkmanufactory.
31. Chemical manufactory.
4. Pump works.
5. Cement works.
6. Wire mills
6. Jute manufacture.
7. Laborers (construction)
7. Laborers (railroad).
7. Rolling mill.
7. Carpenters.
7. Structural iron works.
8. Wire mill.
9. Lead manufactory.
9. Building trades.
9. Sugar refinery.
11. Painters and paperhangers.
12. Water power company.
12. Porcelain works.
13. ICarpet mills.

March
March
Mareh
Mareh
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April

Elizabeth
Elizabeth.
Plainfield.
Roosevelt.
Harrison.
Cranford.
Trenton.
Paterson.
Jersey City.
Long Branch..
Perth Amboy.
Elizabeth.
Boonton..
Elizabeth.
Elizabeth.
Newark.
Edgewater.
Newark.
Trenton.
Trenton.
Little Falls.

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