The Lives of the Chief Justices of England, from the Norman Conquest Till the Death of Lord Tenterden

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Blanchard & Lea, 1857 - 587 pages

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Page 86 - Commander ; he, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower ; his form had yet not lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than Archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured...
Page 161 - O'Brien and the several exhibits therein referred to it is ordered that Monday the 23rd day of April instant be given to His Majesty's Secretary of State for Home Affairs to show cause why a writ of Habeas Corpus should not issue directed to...
Page 169 - Not Guilty, and I am ready to defend the same by my body ;" and thereupon taking off his glove, he threw it upon the floor of the court. The appellant did not choose to submit to this trial, and abandoned his proceedings.
Page 6 - Modern Cookery in all its Branches, reduced to a System of Easy Practice. For the use of Private Families. In a Series of Receipts, all of which have been strictly tested, and are given with the most minute exactness. By ELIZA ACTON. New Edition : with Directions for Carving, and other Additions.
Page 194 - Of all monarchs, indeed, since the Revolution, the successor of George the Third will have the finest opportunity of becoming nobly popular.
Page 98 - ... being tampered with. But, if an individual can break down any of those safeguards which the Constitution has so wisely and so cautiously erected, by poisoning the minds of the jury at a time when they are called upon to decide, he will stab the administration of justice in its most vital parts.
Page 108 - Third, by the grace of God of the united kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland king, defender of the faith, and in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five.
Page 99 - Nor, gentlemen, is this belief confined to men of comparative seclusion, since men, the greatest and most distinguished both as philosophers and as monarchs, have enforced this belief, and shown its influence by their conduct. Above all, gentlemen, need I name to you the Emperor Julian, who was so celebrated for the practice of every Christian virtue that he was called Julian the Apostle ? ' It is indisputable that nervous excitation is contagious.
Page 220 - This cardinal, Though from an humble stock, undoubtedly Was fashion'd to much honour. From his cradle He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one ; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty and sour to them that loved him not ; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer...
Page 75 - House, and it is now sub judice; and yet it is said that this is a libel on the prosecutor. It is impossible for us to admit that the proceeding of either of the houses of parliament is a libel; and yet that is to be taken as the foundation of this application.

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