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hundred and eight, several acts for granting certain rates and duties, and for allowing certain drawbacks and bounties on goods, wares, and merchandise, imported into and exported from Ireland.

July 17.

An act to revive and continue, until the expiration of six weeks after the commencement of the next session of parliament, three acts, passed in the thirty-seventh, forty-fifth, and forty-sixth years of his majesty's reign, for carrying into execution the treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation, between his majesty and the United States of America; and for empowering his majesty to suspend, before the first day of March, one thousand eight hundred and eight, the provisions of the said acts, for such period as his majesty may deem expedient.

An act to indemnify persons who have advised or acted under an order of council for making regulations with respect to the navigation and commerce between his majesty's subjects and the subjects of the United States of America.

An act for raising the sum of three millions by loans or exchequer bills, for the service of Great Britain for the year one thousand eight hundred and seven.

An act for raising the sum of one million five hundred thousand pounds, by loans or exchequer bills, for the service of Great Britain for the year one thousand eight hun. dred and seven.

July 25.

An act for granting to his majesty a sum of money to be raised by lotteries.

An act to provide for the reco

very of penalties under certain acts, made in the forty-seventh year of his present majesty, for securing the rates and duties in Ireland in respect of dwelling houses, fire hearths, windows, male servants, horses, dogs, and carriages; and on licences to persons dealing in exciseable commodities; and on paper and paper hangings; and to alter the condition of certain bonds to be given by brewers in Ireland. August 1.

An act to suppress insurrections, and prevent the disturbance of the public peace in Ireland.

An act to repeal certain duties of excise, and also certain stamp-duties in Ireland, and to grant certain new stamp-duties in lieu thereof; and to amend the laws relating to the stamp-duties in Ireland.

An act to grant to his majesty, until the fifth day of July, one thou sand eight hundred and eight, certain duties on the importation, and to allow drawbacks on the expor tation, of certain goods, wares, and merchandise, into and from Ireland.

An act to enable his majesty to appoint the chancellor of the ex. chequer for the time being in Ireland, one of the commissioners for executing the office of lord high treasurer in England, without salary.

An act to enable the lords commissioners of his majesty's treasury to issue exchequer bills, on the credit of such aids or supplies as have been or shall be granted by parlia. ment for the service of Great-Britain, for the year one thousand eight hundred and seven.

An act to continue until the first day of June, oue thousand eight hundred and eight, an act of the

forty

forty-fifth year of his present majesty, for appointing commissioners to inquire into the public expenditure, and the conduct of the public business in the military departments therein mentioned. August 8.

An act to enable the trustecs of the British Museum to exchange, sell, or dispose of such parts of the collections, and under such restrictions as are therein specified.

An act for permitting, until the twenty-fifth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and nine, and from thence to the end of the then next session of parliament, the importation of certain enumerated articles into the British colonies on the continent of North America, from the United States of America, and the exportation of other enumerated articles from the same colonies to the said states.

An act for more effectually charging public accountants with interest upon balances; and for other purposes relating to the pas. sing of public accounts.

An act to enable the East-India company to raise money upon bond, instead of increasing their capital stock.

An act to continue, until the first day of June, one thousand eight hundred, and ten, and from thence to the end of the then next session of parliament, and amend an act of the forty-second year of his present majesty, for the more effectual administration of the office of a justice of the peace in such parts of the counties of Middlesex and Surrey as lie in and near the metropolis; and for the more effectual prevention of felonies.

An act for transferring to his

2

majesty certain possessions and rights vested in the Sierra Leone company, and for shortening the duration of the said company, and for preventing any dealing or trafficking in the buying or selling of slaves within the colony of Sierra Leone.

An act to enable his majesty to grant to her majesty the queen a capital messuage, called Frogmore, and divers lands and hereditaments in the parishes of New Windsor and Old Windsor, in the county of Berks, and a piece of land in Wyrothsbury, in the county of Bucks, for a term of ninety-nine years, if her majesty and the princesses, her five younger daughters, or any of them, shall so long live, for and in lieu of her majesty's present terms and interest therein; and also to make exchanges.

An act to grant certain duties on calicoes, muslins, cotton yarn, and cotton twist, of the manufacture of Great-Britain or Ireland respectively, on their importation into either country from the other, according to the regulations contained in the acts for the union of Great-Britain and Ireland.

An act to explain an act, of the forty-seventh year of his present majesty, for enabling the Albion fire and life-insurance company to sue in the name of their secretary, and to inrol annuities.

An act to explain an act, of the forty-seventh year of his present majesty, for enabling the Globe in. surance company to sue in the name of their treasurer, and to inrol annuities.

An act to explain an act, of the forty-seventh year of his present majesty, for enabling the Pelican

life

life-insurance company to sue in the name of their secretary, and to inrol annuities.

August 13.

An act to prevent improper persons from having arms in Ire land.

An act for allowing a certain proportion of the militia in Ireland, voluntarily to enlist into his majesty's regular forces.

An act for increasing the militia of Ireland, under certain limitations and restrictions.

An act for allowing a certain proportion of the militia in Great Britain voluntarily to enlist into his majesty's regular forces.

An act for encouraging the exPortation of salt from Ireland.

An act to amend an act, of the forty-sixth year of his majesty, for the better regulation of the office of receiver-general of the post-office in England.

August 14.

An act for the speedy completing the militia of Great-Britain, and increasing the same under certain limitations and restrictions.

hundred thousand pounds by treasury bills for the service of Ireland for the year one thousand eight hundred and seven.

An act for enabling his majesty to raise the sum of four millions five hundred thousand pounds for the service of Great-Britain.

An act for more effectually seeuring the payment of the debts of traders.

An act for suspending the opera. tion of an act of the thirty-sixth year of his present majesty, for the further support and maintenance of curates within the church of England, and for other purposes in the said act mentioned, so far as relates to the avoidance of benefices by the incumbents thereof having accepted augmented curacies.

An act for granting to his majesty a certain sum of money out of the consolidated fund of Great Britain, and for applying certain moneys there mentioned for the service of the year one thousand eight hundred and seven, and for further appropriating the supplies granted in this session of parlia

An act for raising the sum of five ment.

STATE

STATE PAPERS.

[The following Paper was, by accident, omitted in our Volume for 1806. Its proper place, in that volume, would have been immediately preceding The Swedish Declaration, in p. 686.]

The King of Prussia's Proclamation, respecting the occupation, by his Troops, of the Electorate of Ha

nover.

“WE

E, Frederic William, by the Grace of God, king of Prussia, &c. &c. hereby make known, &c. After the events which have terminated in peace between Austria and France, all our endeavours have been directed to ward off from these districts the flames of war, and its disastrous consequences, which momentarily threatened the north of Germany, and particularly the countries of the electorate of Brunswick. With this view, and as the only possible ⚫ means to attain it, a convention has been made and concluded between us and the emperor of the French, in pursuance of which, the states of his Britannic Majesty in Germany will not be again occupied by French or other troops combined with them; and, till the conclusion of a general peace, will be wholly occupied and governed by us: in pursuance of which, we have caused the Brunswick electoral countries, to be occupied by the corps under the command of our general of cavalry, Count Von Der Schulenburg Kennert, to whom, in our name, and till the peace, we VOL. XLIX.

entrust the administration of the said
countries in such manner that, through
him, and the commission of govern-
ment which he may think proper to
appoint, all affairs relating to the
government of the country may be
transacted, and the
thereto communicated to the interior
necessary orders
of magistracy and magistrates.

"We therefore charge, as well those, as the prelates, nobles, citizens, and all subjects and inhabitants of the said country, without exception, to conform themselves duly to these dispositions made for their welfare; and also to the commands of our before-mentioned commissaries of administration, and the commission by them to be appointed, as well with regard to civil as military affairs; not only not throwing any impediment in the way of our troops which are to march in, but to assist and afford them all the information in their power; and in the high or more general affairs of the country, and also in propositions and petitions thereto relating, alone and only to address themselves to the beforementioned commissaries of administration, as standing highest under our immediate orders.

"As by this measure we have in view the repose and tranquillity of U u

the

the North of Germany and of the Brunswick states, so we have resolved to pay out of our treasury for the necessaries for our troops, according to the peace establishment, and leaving the extraordinary expences of a state of war to be defrayed by the country; while we, on another hand, shall take care in general, that its revenues, during our administration, after deducting the expences of government, shall only be appropriated to its advantage.

"We further promise, that our troops shall observe the strictest diseipline; that attention shall be given to all just complaints; and in general, that every quiet and peaceable inhabitant shall be maintained in his property and rights, and, in case of need, be vigorously protected; but that, on the contrary, those who may refuse to conform themselves to the dispositions concluded on, and the measures which have been taken, or who may dare to counteract them in anywise, will have to reproach themselves for the rigid and disagreeable consequences which will unavoidably result

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inspector Etienne Mentor, were the ministers charged with the execution of these sanguinary orders in the quarters of Des Cayes. They were already employed in taking measures for executing them, when, being de tected in their abominable projects, they were both arrested by order of the brave Ouagnac. The inhabitants of the town of Des Cayes, finding support in this amiable chief and his troops, rose en masse, and swore to die with arms in their hands.

"Colonel Francis Yeune, informed of the movements which took place in the town of Des Cayes, appeared in the midst of his fellow-citizens, confirmed them in these noble resolutions, and departed to propose in his division those sublime principles which were to ensure the triumph of innocence. To arrive, address his companions in arms, and to dispose them to adopt his sentiments, were for him only the work of a moment.

"The minister of war, apprised by the colonel of the disposition of the inhabitants and troops, although ill, quitted his bed to put himself at the head of this holy insurrection. His whole suite followed him, and his zeal was well rewarded by the gratitude of his fellow-citizens. Soon after generals Ferou and Vaval followed his generous example. Colonel Brune also conducted himself perfectly in

this crisis.

"After having formed all his dispositions, the minister set out from L'Anse a Veau, with the 15th and 16th demi-brigade, and advanced towards Mirajoune. On the next day he had a conversation with general Gayon, who was encamped at Little Goave, and finding him favourable to his designs, every thing was agreed upon; but still this general would not conclude any thing until the arrival

of

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