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tons and upwards, to be made use of instead of the common steelyard, or beams and weight. Dated January 24, 1807.

William Hance, of Tooley-street, in the parish of St. Olave, Southwark, in the county of Surry, hatter; for a method of rendering waterproof, beaver and other hats. Dated January 29, 1807.

Benjamin Southcombe, of Bricklane, in the parish of St. Luke, in the county of Middlesex, tin-plate-worker; for a method of making flexible or malleable metallic plates into convex or concave forms or hollow shapes. Dated January 29, 1807.

Richard Friend, of the Broadway, St. Thomas, in the borough of Southwark, and county of Surrey, gun-carriage-maker; for improvements in the making and working gun and carronade carriages. Dated January 29, 1807.

Simon Orgill, of the town and county of the town of Nottingham, frame-smith; for certain stops for working bolt-wheels, affixed to the machine attached to the common warp-lace-frame, to give notion to the said machine, and also to a rotatory spindle, projections, and levers to be affixed to the said frame itself, to give motion to the said frame for the purpose of manufacturing by a more simple, certain, and expeditious method, lace or net-work, of various figures and qualities, with silk, cotton, worsted, or other materials, produced from animal, vegetable, or mineral substances. Dated February 3, 1807.

Richard Lorentz, of Great Portland-street, in the county of Middlesex, esq; for certain machines or instruments, one of which will produce instantaneous light, and the other instantaneous fire; communicated by

foreigners residing abroad. Dated February 5, 1807.

James Essex, of the town of Northampton, woolstapler and grocer; for a method of making or manufac turing dyed, bottled, or felted wool, into mats, rugs, carpets, &c. of various colours, figures, patterns, and sizes, for carriages, halls, parlours, hearths, and sundry other purposes. Dated February 5, 1807.

James Spershott, of Shelton, in the county of Stafford, clay-merchant; for an improvement in the manufacture of earthenware. Dated February 7, 1807.

John Day, of Camberwell-green, in the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth, stone-mason; for an engine for the purpose of loading and unloading vessels, and also for raising large anchors and other immense weights to any height required. Dated February 12, 1807.

Charles earl Stanhope, for im provements respecting the form, construction, and manner of building and fitting out ships and vessels for the purpose of navigation, and especially for counteracting or diminishing the danger of that most mischievous invention for destroying ships and vessels, known by the name or appellation of submarine bombs, carcasses, or explosious. Dated February 16, 1807.

James Winter, of Stoke under Hamidon, in the county of Somerset, glove manufacturer; for a machine for sewing and pointing leather gloves with neatness and strength, much superior to that which is effected by manual labour. Dated Feb. 20, 1807.

Andrew Kauffman, of the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, in the county of Middlesex, musical-instrumentmaker; for improvements in the construction

construction of the flageolette or English flute. Dated February 20, 1807.

Archibald Thomson, of the parish of St. John, in the city of Westminster, and county of Middlesex, engineer; for improvements (by the application of known principles) upon certain parts of mill-spinning for spinning of wool or cotton. Dated February 20, 1807.

Isaac Sauford, of the city of Gloncester, civil engineer, and Stephen Price, of Stroud, in the county of Gloucester, civil engineer; for an improvement or method to raise a nap or pile on woollen, cotton, and all other cloth which may require a nap or pile, as a substitute for teasels or cards. Dated Feb. 20, 1807.

Frederic Albert Winsor, of Pallmall, in the county of Middlesex, gentleman; for an improved oven, stove, furnace, or apparatus for the extracting of inflammable air or gas, and oil-tar, acetous and ammonial liquors, from different kinds of fuel, for reducing such fuel into coke and charcoal and for completely purifying such inflammable air or gas of its odour during a state of combustion. Dated February 20, 1807.

John Falconer Atlee, of Wandsworth, in the county of Surry, distiller; for an improved apparatus to be used in fermenting of liquors. Dated March 7, 1807.

John Maberley, of Bedford-row, in the county of Middlesex, gent. for a method of making and constructing tents, poles, and other machinery, so as to expel and carry off noxious and contaminated air by a readier and more effectual ventilation than can be accomplished by the tents in common use. Dated March 7, 1807. Elizabeth Bell, of Blackheath, in the county of Kent, spinster; for

certain improvements in an artificial method of sweeping chimnies, and an improvement in the preparing and manufacturing pieces used for the constructing the chimnies invented by her, so as to render the said pieces capable of being better joined together, and more advantageously used for the conveying smoke, water, and other fluids or bodies, in a divided and pulverulent state, in any required direction; and also certain methods, machinery, and apparatus, useful or necessary for manufacturing such pieces, and applicable for the purpose of forming various other articles of pottery. Dated March 7, 1807.

John Houlditch, of Long Acre, in the county of Middlesex, coachmaker; for certain improvements in the construction of four-wheeled carriages of different descriptions. Dated March 7, 1807.

Henry Charles Christian Newman, clerk, rector of St. Jolm's, Capisterre, in the island of St. Christopher; for a machine applicable to mills in general, and to various other purposes, but more particularly adapted to the cattle mills employed for expressing the juice of the sugar-cane, by greatly augmenting their power and execution, with fewer cattle, and by increasing the number of the revolutions of the spindle and rollers in the proportion of ten to one of the present mills, or even more if required, by means of a ring, made either of wood or cast iron, round the mill, and by an entirely new construction of the axis in peritrochio, the lever, and a lantern wheel or pinion, the trundles or teeth of which turn a cog wheel on the spindle of the mill; which axis in peritrochio, lever, and lantern wheel or pinion, are also constructed so as to revolve 314 together

together with two distinct motions; that is to say, a rotary round their own axis, and a progressive circumvolutionary on the ring, constantly acting upon and compelling the cog wheel and spindle with their separate and united forces. Dated March 7, 1807.

John Day, of Camberwell-green, in the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth, stone-mason; for a method of applying friction boxes, either with or without a perpetual screw, spindle, and cog-whical, to extend and facilitate the power of engines, cranes, capstans, and other machines used for loading and unloading ships or vessels, and for raising anchors and other great weights or bodies, and also to the steerage-wheels of ships or vessels. Dated March 20, 1807.

Thomas Johuson, wechanic, in Glasgow; for a machine for weaving yarn. Dated March 23, 1807.

Archibald Thomson, of the parish of St. John, in the city of Westininster, and county of Middlesex, engineer; for certain improvements (by the application of known principles) upon certain parts of mill-spinning for spinning wool or cotton. April 2, 1807.

James Peache, of Cuper's bridge, Lambeth, in the county of Surry, Barge-builder; for a floating hollow buoy, on a new construction, for supporting mooring chains, cables, ropes, &c. Dated April 8, 1807.

Wiliam Chapman, of the town and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, civil engineer; for a method or methods of reducing the wear, and prolonging the duration of ropes used in drawing coals or other minerals from pits or shafts of mines. Dated April 8, 1807.

Samuel Williams, of Finsburysquare, in the city of London, merchant; for new and improved ma

chines and machinery for spinning wool, cotton, hemp, and other filamentuous substances. Communicated to him by a foreigner residing abroad, April 8, 1807.

Richard Francis Hawkins, of the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse, in the county of Middlesex, gentleman; for certain improvements to all kinds of gun and carronade carriages, so as to facilitate the working or using, securing, and housing thereof, particu larly adapted to ships. Dated April 8, 1807.

William Southwell, of the city of Dublin, musical instrument-maker; for certain improvenients upon a piano-forte, which is so constructed as to prevent the possibility of its being so frequently out of tune, as pianofortes now generally are, which he denominates "A cabinet piano-forte." Dated April 8, 1807.

William Chapman, of the town and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, civil engineer; for a method or methods of putting coals on board of ships, lighters, and other vessels, so as to prevent a great portion of the, breakage of the coals which takes place in the usual method of shipping them by spouts. Dated April 11, 1807.

Thomas Patty, of St. Thomas's Watering, Kent-road in the parish of St. Giles's Camberwell, in the county of Surry, manufacturer; for a method of dying, spiuning, weaving, and manufacturing of East-India sun-fiemp into carpets and carpet rug-matts, which will be more durable and less expensive than any now in use. Dated April 11, 1807.

Alexander John Forsyth, clerk, of Belhelvie, Aberdeenshire, in Scotland; for a method of discharging or giving fire to artillery and all other fire-arms, chambers, cavities, and

places,

places, in which gun-powder or other combustible matter is or may be put for the purpose of explosion. Dated April 11, 1807.

Anthony Francis Berte, of the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in the city of London, merchant; forcer tain improvements in casting printer's types and sorts, and other articles of metal. Communicated to him by a certain foreigner residing abroad.Dated April 15, 1807.

James Forbes Dalton, of HighHolborn, in the county of Middlesex, coach-maker, for certain improvements in the construction of fourwheel carriages. Dated April 21, 1807.

William Shotwell, of the city of New York, in America, now residing in the city of London, merchant; for certain machines and improvements upon machines, for the purpose of bleaching, washing, and cleansing linen, and every other article that can be done by hand. Dated April

21, 1807.

Abraham Matterface, of the parish of Christ-church, in the county of Surrey, Mill-wright; for certain improvements in the construction of a machine for mashing and mixing malt. Dated April 21, 1807.

Mark Noble, of the parish of Battersea, in the county of Surrey, engine-maker; for a chain-pump, handpump, and an improved extinguishing fire-engine. Dated Ap. 25, 1807.

Robert John Stanley, of the town of Gainsborough, in the county of Lincoln, gentleman; for a method of tanning leather without the use or application of bark (or mineral astringent), except in the tanning of backs and bins, yielding a great advantage both in respect to time and expence, whereby as good if not a superior article or commodity is produced; the ingredients required by this method

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of tanning are entirely of a vegetable quality, and principal part thereof the produce of the United Kingdom.— Dated April 28, 1807.

Rudolphe Cabanel, of Lambeth, Surrey, engineer; for improvements in the construction of wheels and axletrees, by which will be obtained the following and other advantages: the carriage will be less liable to overturn; and, in consequence of the friction being almost wholly done away, will move with much less power or labour of the horses, the necessary oil or grease being supplied without separating the wheel from the axle, are so securely attached as to obviate the frequent accident of the wheels coming off, and should they be injured, any other wheel, whether cart, coach, or waggon, may be substituted as a temporary resource, and a wheel or wheels may be shifted at pleasure. Dated May 5, 1807.

James Woods, of Ormskirk, Lancashire, chair-maker; for a machine for churning milk and cream, and which may be used as a pump. Dated May 9, 1807.

William Cubitt, of Walsham, Norfolk, engineer; for a method of equalizing the motion of the sails of windmills. Dated May 9, 1807.

Francis Frome, of Spring-Gardens, Westminster, Middlesex, gentleman; for an improved portable boot-jack, with a guard to prevent the possibility of any accident to the legs or ankles in pulling off the boots. Dated May 11, 1807.

William Bainbridge, of Holborn, London, musical instrument-maker; for improvements on the flageolette or English-flute. Dated May 14, 1807.

John Roebuck, of Warren-street, St. Pancras, Middlesex, civil engineer; for improvements in a machine called The Caledonian Balance. Dated May 14, 1807.

Chester

Chester Gould, of Walworth, Surrey, gent; for improvements on a machine for mangling linen and other articles required to be mangled.Dated May 26, 1807.

Joseph Bowyer, of Kidderminster, in the county of Worcester, carpetmanufacturer; for a method of working or manufacturing carpeting for carpets and carpet rugs not heretofore used. Dated May 29, 1807.

John Brown, of the parish of St. Andrew Hubbard, in the city of London, stationer; for certain improvements in the construction of a press for printing books and other articles, part of which may be applied to presses now in common use. Dated June 2, 1807.

John Bywater, of the town and county of the town of Nottingham; for certain improvements in the construction of windlasses for weighing the anchors of ships and navigable vessels, and various other purposes. Dated June 6, 1807.

Allan Pollock, of Paisley, NorthBritain, at present residing in London, merchant, for a stove of a new construction, and various improvements applicable to stoves, grates, and fire places. Dated June 11, 1807.

Henry Maudlay, of Margate-street, Cavendish-square, in the county of Middlesex, engineer; for improvements in the construction of steamengines. Dated June 13, 1807.

Francis Plowden, of Essex-street, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, esq. for a safe and sure method of preserving, for an extraordinary length of time, at sea and on land, butcher's meat, animal and other comestible substances, in a sweet, palatable, and nutritious state without acid, salt, or drying; the preservation of which apthartic viands he conceives will be of great public utility. Dated June 13, 1807.

John Syeds, of Rotherhithe Wall, in the county of Surrey, compass-inaker; for certain improvements in the construction of a machine for making rope or cordage, either shroud or cable laid, and in the mode of manufacturing the same. Dated June 16, 1807.

Robert Barlow, of Spring Gardens, in the county of Middlesex, chemist and medical electrician; for certain oriental, aromatic, chemical compositions or compounds, to be made and moulded into various forms, shapes, and ornamental devices, as amulets in butter-flies, birds, shells, and animals, and to be worn as an ormmental part of dress by ladies and gentlemen, as rings, broaches, lockets, pins, combs, bandeaus, and other ornaments; which oriental, aromatic, chemical composition he denominates "ebenbosamic and ebengavui-bosamic composition or compounds, or aromatic variegated artificial marbles and stones, opaque and transparent. Dated June 16, 1807.

William Atkins, of the city of Norwich, shawl-manufacturer; for certain improvements in the construction of a loom for weaving borders or stripes, or different colours, on shawis or any goods made of cotton, silk, linen, or worsted, or any other mixture of the same. Dated June 16, 1807.

James Palmer, of Enon Cottage, Shrewsbury, in the county of Salop: for a method of constructing and erecting bridges. Dated June 26, 1807.

John Dickinson, of the parish of St. Martin Ludgate, in the city of London, stationer; for a certain machine or machinery for cutting and placing paper. Dated June 30, 1807.

William Bound, of Ray-street, in the parish of St. James Clerkenwell,

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