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WINTER, the fourth Paftoral,

P. I.

P. II.

P. 18.

P. 23.

p. 29.

MESSIAH, a facred Eclogue, in imitation of Virgil's Pollio, p. 35.

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TRANSLATION S.

JANUARY and MAY, or the Merchant's Tale, from Chaucer, p. 187.

The WIFE of BATH, from CHAUCER,

SAPHO to PHAON, an Epiftle, from Ovid,

p. 229.

P. 253.

VERTUMNUS and POMONA, from the fourteenth Book of Ovid's Metamorphofis,

p. 268.

The FABLE of DRYOPE, from the ninth Book of Ovid's Metamorphofis,

The first Book of STATIUS his THEBAIS,

Part of the thirteenth Book of HOMER'S ODYSSEIS,

P. 275.

p. 281.

P. 325.

The Gardens of ALCINOUS, from the ninth Book of HOMER'S

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ODE for MUSICK on St. Cecilia's Day

Chorus of Athenians,

Chorus of Youths and Virgins,

To Mr. Jervas, with Frefnoy's Art of Painting,
Mr. Dryden,

Two CHORUS's to the Tragedy of Brutus, not yet publick, p. 353.

VERSES to the memory of an unfortunate Lady,

P. 345.

A

ibid.

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P. 363.

To a young Lady, with the Works of Voiture,
To the fame, on her leaving the Town after the

p. 368. Coronation,

P. 373.

On a Fan of the Author's defign, in which was painted the ftory of Cephalis and Procris, with the Motto, Aura veni, p. 376. On Silence, in imitation of the style of the late E. of R. p. 377. EPITAPH,

PROLOGUE to Mr. Addifon's Tragedy of CATO,

P. 380.

EPILOGUE to JANE SHORE,

P. 381.

gham,

Occafion'd by fome VERSES of his Grace the Duke of Buckin

P. 384.

ELOISA to ABELARD, an Epistle,

P. 387.

P. 389.

PASTORALS,

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DISCOURSE

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PASTORAL POETRY.

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HERE are not, I believe, a greater number of any fort of verfes than of those which are called Paftorals, nor a a smaller, than of those which are truly fo. It therefore seems neceffary to give fome account of this kind of Poem, and it is my design to comprize in this short paper the fubftance of those numerous differtations the Criticks have made on the subject, without omitting any of their rules in my own favour. You will alfo find fome points reconciled, about which they feem to dif fer, and a few remarks which I think have efcaped their obfervation.

The original of Poetry is afcribed to that age which fucceeded the creation of the world: And

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