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other payments in respect to the said office.

An act for making compensation to the proprietors of such lands and hereditaments as have been purchased for better securing his majesty's docks, ships, and stores at Chatham, and for the use of his majesty's ordnance at Warley Common and Woolwich, in pursuance of an act made in the 44th year of his present majesty.

An act for exonerating the estates of Percival Lewis esq. and Marianne Lewis, spinster, in the parish of Putney in the county of Surrey, from the claims of his majesty against the estate of Edward Lewis, esq. deceased.

An act for erecting a light house on the Bell or Cape rock, on the eastern coast of Scotland, and for enabling the commissioners of the treasury to advance a certain sum of money out of the consolidated fund of Great Britain, towards that pur

pose.

July 22.

An act to amend an act passed in the 42d year of his present majesty, for consolidating the several acts passed for the redemption and sale of the land tax, and to make further provision for exonerating small livings and charitable institutions from the land tax.

An act to provide for the security and expedition of the conveyance of letters by the post in Ireland.

An act to amend the laws relating to bankrupts.

An act to alter and amend two acts, made in the 28th and 30th years of his present majesty, for limiting the number of persons to be Barried on the outside of stage,

coaches, or other carriages, and regulating the conduct of the drivers and guards thereof.

An act to extend the provisions of an act made in the 43d year of his present majesty, for permitting certain articles to be warehoused in Great Britain, or other articles not therein mentioned, and to alter the condition of the bond directed to be given by an act of the 24th year of his present majesty, by the masters and owners of vessels and boats licensed by the lords of the admiralty.

An act to repeal part of the excise countervailing duty on Irish hops imported; for granting an excise countervailing duty on the importation of Irish window glass; and to exempt tiles made for the purpose of draining lands from the duties of excise.

An act for altering and amending several laws relating to the duties of excise upon malt, until the 25th day of March 1807.

An act to amend two acts, passed in the 42d year of his present majesty, relating to the militia of England and Scotland respectively as to the pay of the officers and mon of the said militia.

An act for making more effecttual provision for the more speedy and regular examination and audit of the public accounts of this kingdom.

An act for the better regulation of the office of surveyor general of woods and forests.

An act for enquiring into the state of Windsor forest in the county of Berks, and for ascertaining the boundaries of the said forest, and of the lands of the crown within the same.

An act to repeal an act passed in

the forty-fourth year of his present majesty, intituled, "An act to alter, amend, and render more ef. fectual an act, passed in the present session of parliament, intituled, An act for establishing and maintaining a permanent additional force for the defence of the realm, and to provide for augmenting his majesty's regular forces, and for the gradual reduction of the militia of England, so far as the same relates to the city of London.'

An act for enabling his majesty to settle annuities on certain branches of the royal family.

An act for settling and securing a * certain annuity on the earl Nelson, and the heirs male of his body, and such other persons to whom the title of earl Nelson may descend; and for granting a sum of money to purchase an estate to accompany the said title; and also, for granting a sum of money for the use of the sisters of the late vice-admiral viscount Nelson; in consideration of the eminent and signal services performed by the said late viscount Nelson, to his majesty and the public.

An act to enable his majesty to continue a certain annuity to George, now lord Rodney, graudson of George Brydges lord Rodney, in consideration of the eminent services rendered to his majesty and the public, by the said George Brydges lord Rodney.

An act for granting to his majesty a sum of money to be raised by lot

teries.

An act for granting to his majesty a certain sum of money out of the consolidated fund of Great Britain, for the year 1806; and for further appropriating the supplies granted in this session of parliament.

July 23.

An act for the better regulation of the office of receiver-general of the duties of customs in Great Britain.

An act to enable his majesty to grant new leases on former rents, for the benefit of charitable institutions, or augmentation of ecclesiastical corporations.

An act to stay, until forty days after the commencement of the next session of parliament, proceedings in actions, prosecutions, or informations, under an act made in the second year of king James the first, intituled, "An act concerning tanners, curriers, shoemakers, and other artificers, occupying the cutting of leather," so far as relates to the buying of oak bark and rough hides, and calves skins in the hair.

An act for the preservation of the public harbours of the United Kingdom.

An act for taking down the present building in which the treasury chambers, and offices of the court. of exchequer in Scotland were situated, and erecting new buildings in lieu thereof.

An act for applying certain balances arising from the forfeited estates in Scotland, towards making canals, harbours, and other public

works there.

An act for appropriating certain balances arising from the forfeited estates in Scotland, to the use of the British fisheries, and the erecting a lunatic asylum at Edinburgh, and the payment of the officers of the late board of annexed estates in Scotland.

An act for more effectually car. rying into execution the purposes of an act made in the thirty-ninth and fortieth years of his present* majesty,

majesty, to give further time for the payment, on the conditions therein mentioned, of instalments on certain loans advanced to the house of Alexander Houstoun and Company, to Charles Ashwell, esq. and to William Johnstone, esq. being persons connected with, and trading to the islands of Grenada and St. Vincent, so far as relates to the real and personal estates of William Mac Dowall, James Mac Dowall, and Robert Houstoun Rae, in the West Indies and elsewhere, except in Scotland.

An act for more effectually car

rying into execution the purposes of an act, made in the 39th and 40th years of his present majesty, to give further time for the payment, on the conditions therein mentioned, of instalments on certain loans advanced to the house of Alexander Houstoun and Company, to Charles Ashwell, esq. and to William Johnstone, esq. being persons connected with, and trading to, the islands of Grenada and St. Vincent, so far as relates to the real and personal estates of William Mac Dowall, Jamos Mac Dowall, and Robert Houstoun Rae, esquires, in Scotland.

STATE

STATE PAPERS.

His Majesty's Speech to both Houses of Parliament, on the Meeting of the Fourth Session of the Second Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the Kingdom of Great Britain the Twentieth, on the 21st Day of January, (47th of the King,) 1806.

My lords and gentlemen, N pursuance of the authority given to us by his majesty's commission, under the great scal, amongst other things to declare the cause of his holding this parliament, his majesty has directed us particularly to call your attention to the most decisive success with which Providence has Touchsafed to bless his majesty's arms at sea since you were last assembled in parliament.

The activity and perseverance of his majesty's fleets have been conspicuously displayed in the pursuit and attack ofthe different squadrons of the enemy, and every encounter has terminated to the honour of the British flag, and the diminution of the naval force of the powers with whom his majesty is at war; but the victory obtained over the combined fleet of France and Spain, off cape Trafalgar, has manifested, beyond any exploit recorded even in the annals of the British navy, the skill and enterprize

of his majesty's officers and seamen ; and the destruction of so large a proportion of the naval strength of the enemy has not only confirmed, in the most signal manner, the maritime superiority of this country, but has essentially contributed to the security of his majesty's dominions.

His majesty most deeply regrets that the day of that memorable triumph should have been unhappily clouded with the fall of the heroic commander under whom it was achieved, and he is persuaded that you will feel that this lamented but glorious termination of a series of transcendent exploits claims a distinguished expression of the lasting gratitude of his country; and that you will therefore cheerfully concur in enabling his majesty to annex to those honours, which he has conferred on the family of the late lord viscount Nelson, such a mark of national munificence as may preserve to the latest posterity the memory of his name and services, and the benefit of his great example.

His majesty has commanded us further to inform you, that whilst the superiority of his arms at sea has been thus uniformly asserted and maintained, he has not been wanting in his endeavours to apply the means which were so liberally placed at his disposal, in aid of such of the pow

ers of the continent as had evinced a determination to resist the formida. ble and growing encroachments of France. He has directed the several treaties to be laid before you; and though he cannot but deeply lament that the events of the war in Germany have disappointed his hopes, and led to an unfavourable issue, yet his majesty feels confident that, upon a review of the steps which he has taken, you will be of opinion that he has left nothing undone on his part to sustain the efforts of his allies, and that he has acted in strict conformity to the principles declared by him and recognised by parliament as essential to the interests and security of his own dominions, as well as to the general safety of the continent.

It is a great consolation to his majesty, and one in which he is persuaded you will participate, that although the emperor of Germany has felt himself compelled to withdraw from the contest, his majesty continues to receive from his august ally, the emperor of Russia, the strongest assurances of unshaken adherence to that generous and enlightened policy by which he has hitherto been actuated; and his majesty has no doubt that you will be fully sensible of the important advantage to be derived from preserving, at all times, the closest and most iutimate connection with that Sovereign.

Gentlemen of the house of commons. His majesty has directed the estimates for the year to be laid before you, and he has commanded us to inform you that they are formed upon that scale of exertion which the present situation of the country renders indispensable. His majesty

fully relies upon your granting him such supplies as, upon due delibera, tion, the public exigencies may ap pear to require.

It is his earnest wish to contribute, by every means in his power, to alleviate the additional burthens which must necessarily be imposed upon his people; and with this view he has directed the sum of one million sterling, part of the proceeds arising from the sale of such prizes made on the powers with which he is at war, as are by law vested in the crown, to be applied to the public service of the year.

My lords and gentlemen,

His majesty is fully persuaded that, whatever pride and confidence you may feel in common with him in the success which has distinguished the British arms in the course of the present contest, you will be sensible how much the events of the war on the continent, by which the predominant power and influence of France have been so unhappily extended, require the continuance of all possible vigilance and exertion.

Under this impression, his majesty trusts that your attention will be invariably directed to the improvement of those means which are to be found in the bravery and discipline of his forces, in the zeal and loyalty of every class of his subjects, and in the unexhausted resources of his dominions, for ren. dering the British empire invin cible at home as well as formidable abroad; satisfied, that by such efforts alone the contest can be brought to a conclusion, consistent with the safety and independence of the country, and with its rank amongst the nations of the world.

Treaties,

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