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ON A YOUNG GENTLEMAN'S DEATH...INSCRIPTION. 307

Blest mansion then, simplicity's abode,
ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG

Where smiling innocence look'd up to God,
GENTLEMAN.

Where nature's genuine gracescharm'd the heart,

Or nature, polish'd but by classic art. [beams, Go, mournful spirit, wing thy dreary way,

There fancy, warm'd with brightest, chastest Leave a lov'd mansion, leave the cheerful day; The saint's high rapture, and the poet's dreams, A naked wanderer on the winter's wind,

While virtue left, delighting there to dwell, Ah leave, reluctant, youth and strength behind! The pensive mountain, and the hermit's cell.-. Not long a wanderer, to that happier shore

There the good teacher held by turns to youth Be Heaven thy guide, where mourning is no

The blaze of fiction and pure light of truth, In purer mansions, in a form divine, (more!

Who, less by precept than example fir'd, Immortal youth, immortal joy, be tbine!

Glow'd as he taught, inspiring and inspir'd.

Nor think, gay revellers, this awful roof

Echoed no sounds but wisdom's harsh reproof; INSCRIPTION FOR A FOUNTAIN. The social board, attendant mirth, was there,

The smile unconscious of to morrow's care, O you, who mark what flowrets gay, What gales, what odours breathing ncar,

With every tranquil joy of wedded life,

The gracious children, and the faithful wife. What sheltering shades from summer's ray

In dance, in song, in barmless sports approvid, Allure my spring to linger here :

There youth has frolick'd, there soft maids have Yet see me quit this margin green,

lov'd. Yet see me deaf to pleasure's call,

There one, distinguish'd one-not sweeter blows Explore the thirsty haunts of men,

In simpler ornament attir'd, the rose, Yét see my bounty flow for all.

The rose she cull'd to deck the nuptial lower, O learn of me--no partial rill,

Herself as fair-a transitory flower. No slumbering selfish pool be you;

Thus a short hour and woods and turrets
But social laws alike fulfil ;
O flow for all creation too!

The good, the great, the beauteous, perish all.
Another age a gayer race supplies,
Less awful groves, and gaudier villas rise,

See wisdom's place usurp'd by folly's sons,
ON THE CONVERTING THE LATE MR. WOOD-

And scorners sit on virtue's vacant thrones, DESON'S HOUSE, AT KINGSTON, INTO

See neighbouring Combe's old genius quit its POOR-HOUSE,

bowers,

[towers; GREAT WALK OF IGH TREES BEFORE IT.

Not Warwick's' name preserv'd his gothic Where the broad path-way fronts yon ancient Nor distant see new royal domes : deride seat,

What half remains of Wolsey's ancient pride! Approach not, stranger, with unballow'd feet, While yet this humbler pile survives to prove Nor mock the spot, unshelter'd now, and bare ! A mansion worthy of its master's love: The grove's old honours rose majestic there:

Like him, still welcomes to its liberal door It's giant arms extending to defend

Whom most he honour'd, honouring most the Thy reverend temples, man's and virtue's friend!

poor; Secure thy walk that unpierc'd gloom along,

Like him, the lisping infant's blessing shares, No storm approach'd to silence Homer's song;

And age's gratitude in silent prayers. — No beam to wound thy Heav'n-directed eye : While such partake the couch, the frugal feast, The world's near tumult swept unheeded by.

No regal chainbers boast an equal guest; Now, low as thine, these towering heads are laid, For, gracious Maker, by thy own decree, No more embower the mansion in their shade, Receiving mercy is receiving Thee !Time-honour'd pile! that owning thee its lord, Saw ancient manuers, ancient faith, restor’d; 'Combe-Neville, near Kingston, built by the In renovated youth beheld again

king-making earl of Warwick. Saturnian days, the good Eliza's reign.

• The new apartments at Hampton Court, With thee too sheltering many an angel guest, raised on the ruins of part of Wolsey's palace. For what, but Heaven, serener than thy breast?

fall;

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LIFE OF WALTER HARTE,

BY MR. CHALMERS.

The following desultory information, perhaps improperly called a life, is derived principally from the notes on Mr. Nicholls's collection of poems, augmented by various notices in the Gentleman's Magazine, the author's works, and the writings of his contemporaries. His learning and personal worth, neither of which have ever been called in question, would have procured him a inore particular narra. tive, if it had been possible to recover the requisite materials.

His father the rev. Walter Harte was fellow of Pembroke College, Or. ford, prebendary of Wales, canon of Bristol, and vicar of St. Mary Magda. len, Taunton, Somersetshire. Refusing to take the oaths after that revolution which placed a new family on the throne, he relinquished all his preferments, in 1691, and retired to Kentbury in Buckinghamshire, where he died February 10, 1736, aged eighty-five. His son informs us, that when judge Jefferies came to Taunton assizes in the year 1685, to execute his commission upon the unfortunate persons concerned in Monmouth's rebellion, Mr. Harte, then minister of St. Mary Magdalen's, waited on him in private, and remonstrated much against his severities. The judge listened to him calmly, and with some attention, and, though he had never seeät him before, advanced him in a few months to a prebendal stall in the cathedral church of Bristol. “I thought,” says Dr. Warton, who has introduced this story in his notes on Pope, “the reader might not dislike to hear this aneca dote of Jefferies, the only one action of his life that I believe docs him any credit.”

Old Mr. Harte was so much respected for his piety and learning, that the prelates Kidder, Hooper, and Wynne, who successively filled the see of Bath and Wells, contrived that he should receive the profits of his prebend of Wells as long as he lived ; and Mr. Simon Harco urt, afterwa the celebrated lord chancellor,

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