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cal with Ther. pullulum Hentz, was captured at Manitou, Williams' Cañon, July 13. The legs of the first pair, with exception of one of the thighs, are wanting in this example. Notwithstanding the apparent division of the tarsi into a great number of joints, I have not thought it necessary to separate this species from the genus Pholcus.

Section TUBITELARIÆ.

Fam. AGILENOIDE.

Subfam. AGILENINE.

Gen. AGALENOPSIS Giebel, 1863.

9. d. naria (Bosc et Walck.).

SYX.—1841.- Igelena umriu Bosc et Walck., in Walck. et Gerv. 11. N. 11. Ins.

Apt., ii, p. 21. 1813.lgelena pennsylranica C. L. Koch, Die Arachn., X, p. 111, tal).

cccliv, fig. 8:28. 1316.-1yelena potteri Blackw., Votice of Spid. capt. by Prof. Potter in

Canada, etc., in Ann. and Mag. of Nat. Hist., xvii, p. 43. 18.18.—1 gelena naria IIentz, Descr. and Fig. of the Iran. of the L. S.,

v, iv, p. 465, pl. xxx, figs. 1, la. 1869.-Igenelopsis* (ilbipilis Giebel, Leber einige Spinnen aus Illinois,

in Zeitschr. f. d. gesammt. Naturwiss., xxxiii (1869), p. 250. I single young specimen of this species was found at Manitou, Colo.. July 12.

Fam. DRASSOID.E.

Gen. GNAPHOSA (Latr.), 1804. 10. G. conspersa 1.

Cephalothorax longer than patella + tibia of the fourth pair, dull brown, with a varrow black margin, and covered with grayish or reddish-brown hair; fore series of eyes curved moderately downward; fore lateral eyes double as large as the fure centrais; central eyes forming a rectangle mnch longer than broad; legs dull yellowish-brown; tibice of the first pair armed with one, those of the second pair with two, spines below, near the apex; abdomen brown above, ciensely spread with small black spots, sometimes forming irregular oblique rows on the sides; vulva consisting of an egg-sbaped fovea occupied in front by a backward-curved eminence, its bottom behind this eminence being tongueshaped, brown.- qad. Length abont 11 millim.

Female.-Cophalothorax longer than patella + tibia of the fourth pair amply but not strongly rounded in the sides of the pars thoracica, with the pars cephalica narrowing forward, the breadth of the clypeus being little more than half that of the pars thoracica; it is surrounded by a fine elevated border (uot by a broail “liem "); the central furrow is

* 1gcnelopsis is evidently an error of the press, instead of gelenopsis or Agalenopsis.

shortish, situated between the coxæ of the second and third pairs, the cephalic impressions and two other furrows on each side are fine and shallow. The cephalothorax is densely clothed with short, appressed hair, and strewed with long, upturned, bristly hairs. Sternum nearly elliptical, truncate in front, hairy. The hind row of eyes is rather strongly curved backward, the front row curved downward; a line tangent to the upper margins of the fore lateral eyes will cut the fore centrals a little below their middle, The fore lateral eyes are oblong, little larger than the posterior eyes, and double as large as the fore centrals; the area occupied by the cen. tral eyes is very nearly rectangular, scarcely perceptibly broader behind, much longer than broad; the interval between the flat and somewhat oblique hind centrals is little smaller than that between the fore centrals, this latter interval being as great as their diameter, and greater than the interval between them and the fore laterals; the interval between these eyes and the margin of the clypeus is about half again as great as the diameter of one of these eyes and smaller than that which separates them from the hind laterals, this latter space being double as great as the diameter of the eyes, and a little greater than the interval between the hind central and hind lateral eyes. The mandibles are rather small, a little narrower than the thighs of the first pair, as long as the patellae of the first pair, double as long as broad, strongly conrex at the very base, otherwise but slightly convex longitudinally, clothed with bristly hairs; the posterior margin of the claw-furrow forms a denticulate lamella; the claw is short, strong. The maxillæ are strongly rounded on the outer side, with a rather deep transversal depression in the middle; they are curved round the labium, which is about half as long again as broad, somewhat tapering toward the broadly rounded apex, slightly rounded in the sides. The palpi and legs are short, the tibial joint of the former only half as long again as broad. The fourth pair of legs is not much (little more than the length of their tarsus) longer than the first pair. The thighs have 1. 1. spines above the first pair besides 1., the second 1. 1. in front, the third and fourth have 1. 1. in front, 1. 1. behind; the four anterior metatarsi have only 1. 1. spines, situated toward the base below; the tibiæ of the first pair have only 1., and the tidiæ of the second pair only 1.1. spines near the apex below. The patelle and tibiæ are destitute of spines above (i. e., along the middle line of the upper part), with exception of the tibize of the third pair, which have 1. spine above. The tarsi and metatarsi of the four anterior legs are provided with a scopula. The abdomen is inversely orate, densely covered with shorter appressed hairs and spread with longer upturned ones. The vulva has the form of a shallow, oblong, egg-shaped forea, the length of which is not greater than the diameter of the tibiæ; in front, this fovea is occupied by a nearly half-moon-shaped eminence or ridge, emarginate behind, and conrex transversely; the much longer, lower, hinder part of the bottom is Hat, tongue-shaped.

Color.Cephalothorax of a dull brown hue, clothed with grayishbrown, shorter, and black long hairs; the extreme margin is black; the furrows blackish. Sternum yellowish-brown; mandibles and labium darkbrown or piceous; maxillae somewhat paler; all these parts black-haired. Palpi and legs are rather lighter than cephalothorax and abdomen, of a dull yellowish-brown color, paler on the under part, provided with black hairs and spines; the apex of the palpi is piceous. Abdomen dull brown, clothed with grayish or reddish-brown and black hair, densely strewed with small black spots and points, especially on the back and on the sides; on the back, toward the sides, these spots form several oblique rows, which, however, are neither regular nor very conspicuous; along the middle of the fore part is a slightly paler band or line, reaching to the middle of the back. The anterior, more elevated part of the vulva is rusty-brown; the posterior, tongue-shaped portion dark brown, at least sometimes marked with two paler longitudinal lines.

Length of body 11, of cephalothorax 1 millim.; breailth of cephaloth. 31, of forehead (clypeus) nearly 2 millim. Length of legs: I 104, II 10, III 93, IV 124 millim ; patella + tibia IV 37 millim. Length of mandibles 13 millim.

Of this species, one female was captured at Kelso Cabin, Colo., July 6, and another on Gray's Peak, 11-12,000 feet above the level of the sea, July 7. A third, smaller female example, in which the hind portion of the vulva is destitute of the two pale lines seen in the other specimens, was found in Idaho, July 5. The species is also met with in the Eastern States. I possess a female example, captured on Mount Lebanon, Mass., and presented to me by my kind friend Jr. G. Eisen, Docens of zoology in the University of Upsala, to whom I ain also indebted for a great many other North American, especially Californian, spiders. 11. G. scudderi n.

Cephalothorax longer than patella + tibia of the fourth pair, dark with a narrow black margin, and covered with grayish or somewhat brown, reddish brown hair; fore row of eyes curved moderately downward; fore lateral eyes double as large as fore centrals; central eyes form ing a rectangle, much longer than broad; legs brownish-black, paler at the base; tibiæ of first pair armed with 2., of second pair with at least 2. 1. 1. spines below; abdomen dark brown, covered with grayish or reddish-brown hair; vulva consisting of a rhomboidal fovea, the anterior margin of which is produced backward as an obtuse process, and which has a large oblong fovea on each side between the margin and the lamina, which forms the floor of the vulva.-qad. Lengtlı about lif millim.

Female.-In general form, this spider is very similar to the preceding species, G. conspersa. The pars cephalica of the cephalothorax is only a little more equably and strongly rounded in the sides ; in other particulars, cephalothorax, sternum, maxillæ, labium, and palpi are as we have described these parts in G. conspersa. The eyes have the same relative

sizes and position as in that species; the distance between the anterior lateral eyes and the margin of the clypeus appears, however, to be a little greater, somewhat more than half again as great as the diameter of the eye, and the interval between the anterior and posterior lateral eyes is also somewhat greater than in G. conspersa, nearly half again as great as the interval between the lateral and central eyes of the hind row. The mandibles are less strongly convexat the base; in other respects they are as in the former species, equaling in length the patellæ of the first pair. The legs are of nearly the same relative lengths as in G. conspersa, but somewhat more slender; the thighs and the four anterior metatarsi are armed with the same number of spines as in that species; but the tibiæ of the first pair have 2: spines near the apex below, and the tibia of the second pair 2. 1. 1. (or 2. 2. 1.) spines below, and the tibiæ both of the first and second pairs 1. spine above. The abdomen appears to be more elongate than in G. conspersa, being nearıy double as long as broad. The vulva is quite different from that of G. conspersa ; it consists of a fovea, which is a little longer than the diameter of the tibiae, somewhat longer than broall, somewhat dila ted from the ends toward the middle, nearly rhomboidal, but truncated in front and with a depression in the middle, behind, of the limiting margin; the anterior margin is produced backward as a thick, transversely striated, blant process, reaching the center of the vulva; along the middle, the bottom of the fovea forms an uneven, elevated lamina about double as broad ás the said process, nearly double as long as broad, and having a longitudinal depression anteriorly, on which the process is reposing; on each side, between this lamina and the margin of the vulva, is a large oblong fovea.

Color.Cephalothorax dark and dull brownish, with darker impressiones cephalicæ and furrows, and with a fine black margin; it is covered with appressed grayish or somewhat reddish-brown hairs, and spread with longer upturned black ones. Sternum, mandibles, maxillæ, and labium blackish-brown. Palpi and legs blackish-brown, paler, brownish-yellow toward the base. Abdomen brownish, covered with appressed grayish or somewhat reddish-brown hair, and spread with longer, more upturned, black hair. The rulra is brownish, the middle lamina paler, blackish at

the apes.

Length of body 113, of cephalothorax 1} millim.; breadth of cephalothorax a little more than 3, of clypeus 14 millim. Length of legs: I 101, II 93, III nearly 9, IV 12} millim.; of patella + tibia IV 33 millim.; length of mandibles nearly 1.} millim.

One female example was found at “Garden of the Gods”, Colo., July' 13. The species appears to be closely allied to G. brumalis Thor.,* froin

* Notice of Some Spiders from Labrador, in Proceed. of the Boston Soc. of Nat. Hist., xvii, p. 497. —The words “cephalothorace breviore quam”, etc., in the diagnosis of this species, is a slip of the pen for “ cephalothorace longiore quam”, etc. In the diagnosis of Clubiona frigidula Thor., ibidl., p. 196, “20 aculeis” is an error of the press instead of " 2 aculeis ".

Labrador, but the armature of the tibiæ of the second pair is different in this latter species, which has only 2. 1. spines on the under side of these tibiæ.

Gen. PROSTHESIMA L. Koch, 1872.

12. P. melancholica n.

Black, with the palpi and legs dusky yellowish at the base and the tarsi and anterior metatarsi rusty-brown; eyes of the hind row of equal size, much smaller than the fore laterals, which are more than double as large as the fore centrals; the interval between these latter eyes larger than that between the hind centrals; legs of the fourth pair much longer than those of the first; the fanterior tibiæ destitute of spines; vulva forming a large pale area, which shows two fine brown costæ curved in ward and united in the form of a go behind, and inclosing an area, broader than long, scarcely narrowing forward.— ad. Length about 74 millim.

Female.-Cephalothorax a little longer than tibia + patella of the fourth pair, rather strongly rounded in the sides behind, then equally narrowing forward, with the breadth of the clypeus nearly equaling half the breadth of the pars thoracica; it is surrounded by a fine elevated margin, rather strongly convex transversely, very finely coriaceous, strewed with hairs, and has a distinct short middle furrow; the cephalic impressions and three radiating furrows on each side are very faint. The front row of eyes is rather strongly curved downward, the hind row is straight, the interval between the hind lateral and central eyes is somewhat greater than that between the two hind centrals, which is a little smaller than that between the fore centrals; this latterinterval is fully as great as the diameter of the central eyes and greater than the interval between these and the fore laterals. The central eyes occupy an area longer than broad behind and slightly broader behind than in front; the hind central eyes are little if at all larger than the hind laterals; the interval between the fore and hind central eyes is double as great as the diameter of the former, and a little greater than the interval between the fore and hind laterals; the fore lateral eyes are oblong, much larger than the other eyes, more than double as large as the fore centrals, which are the smallest of the eight. The mandibles are rather strongly convex toward the base, about as long as the patellæ of the first pair, more than double as long as broad at the base, not thicker than the tibiæ of the first pair, striated transversely, with hairs and bristles of the ordinary form. The maxille are rounded (not sinuated) and curved inward in front of the insertion of the palpi, truncated at the apex inward ; they have a stong transverse depression somewhat in front of the middle. The palpi and legs are of the form common in this genus, the tibiæ of the first pair incrassated; the fourth pair of legs are much (nearly with the length of their metatarsus) longer than the first, which are but little longer than the second ; these are nearly with the length

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