The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: Including a Variety of Pieces Now First Collected, 2. köide

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Page 233 - Fire and fury, no more of thy stupid explanations, cried he. — Go and inform her we have got company. Were that Scotch hag to be for ever in my family, she would never learn politeness, nor forget that absurd poisonous accent of hers, or testify the smallest specimen of breeding or high life; and yet it is very surprising too, as I had her from a parliament man, a friend of mine, from the highlands, one of the politest men in the world; but that's a secret.
Page 463 - Now lost to all, her friends, her virtue fled Near her betrayer's door she lays her head,' And pinch'd with cold, and shrinking from the shower, With heavy heart deplores that luckless hour, When idly first, ambitious of the town, She left her wheel and robes of country brown.
Page 469 - I was born in Shropshire, my father was a labourer, and died when I was five years old; so I was put upon the parish. As he had been a wandering sort of a man, the parishioners were not able to tell to what parish I belonged...
Page 234 - Poor Jack, cries he, a dear goodnatured creature, I know he loves me ; but I hope, my dear, you have given orders for dinner ; you need make no great preparations neither, there are but three of us, something elegant and little will do ; a turbot, an ortolan, or a . Or what do you think my dear...
Page 294 - Such reflections only served to make the miller unhappy; he discontinued his former assiduity, he was quite disgusted with small gains, and his customers began to forsake him. Every day he repeated the wish, and every night laid himself down in order to dream. Fortune, that was for a long time unkind, at last, however, seemed to smile upon his distresses and indulged him with the wished-for vision.
Page 471 - Our crew was carried into Brest, and many of them died because they were not used to live in a jail ; but for my part, it was nothing to me, for I was seasoned. One night...
Page 469 - I lived an easy kind of a life for five years, I only wrought ten hours in the day, and had my meat and drink provided for my labour. It is true, I was not suffered to stir...
Page 473 - ... a privateer, I should have been entitled to clothing and maintenance during the rest of my life ; but that was not my chance : one man is born with a silver spoon in his mouth, and another with a wooden ladle. However, blessed be God ! I enjoy good health, and have no enemy in this world, that I know of, but the French and the justice of peace.
Page 113 - ... with affection and esteem; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of withstanding the slightest impulse made either by real or fictitious distress; in a word, we were perfectly instructed in the art of giving away thousands, before we were taught the more necessary qualifications of getting a farthing.
Page 113 - ... table. He told the story of the ivy-tree, and that was laughed at; he repeated the jest of the two scholars and one pair of breeches, and the company laughed at that; but the story of Taffy in the sedan-chair, was sure to set the table in a roar.

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