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Wages paid in ordnance department per week of sixty hours and per day of ten hours.

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Wages paid per day of 8.54 hours' work throughout the year in the Malta dock-yard.

Occupations.

Lowest. Highest. Average.

$1 33

72

Fitters and turners
Assistant fitters and turners.
Assistant molders..
Pattern-makers
Carpenters
Shipwrights
Joiners
Coppersmiths
Smiths
Hammermen
Boiler-makers.
Helpers
Blockmakers
Sawyers
Painters
Calkers
Hosemakers
Sailmakers
Tailors
Riggers
Engine-drivers.
Stokers
Skilled laborers
Laborers
Boys.

$1 09

49 48 64 60 56 68 73 60 48 54 36 85 66 60 48 36 60 56 48 60 36 48 32 12

$1 58

97

72 1 11 60 88 72 91 84 54 75

97 1 58

60 1 21

77
1 09
1 09

60
97

52
1 21

97 97 85 52 85 73 56 79 40 48 36 28

1 03

81 78 66

72 64 52 69 38 48 34 20

92 A-LAB-103

GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS AND OFFICES.

Wages paid per annum of eight daily hours to employés in Government departments and

ofices (exclusive of tradesmen and laborers) in Malta.

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Wages paid per annum of eight daily hours, fc.—Continued.

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do.

632 45
291 99

JUDICIAL ESTABLISHMENTS.
Chief justice
Judges
Registrar.
Depnty registrars
Clerks
Interpreters.
Marshals.
Crown lawyers.
Police magistrates
Country magistrates
Archive keepers.
Notary clerks
Police court clerks
Porters and messengers
Police physicians..
Chief of police
Assistant chief of police
Inspectors of polico.
Chemists, of police
Sanitary inspectors..
Sergeants.
Policemen

PRISONS' ESTABLISHMENTS.
Snperintendent.
Assistant superintendent.
Medical officers..
Schoolmaster and chaplain.
Chief warder
Warders
Messengers.
Gatekeeper

..do..
.:do.

.do...
..do..

do.. .do

do
.do..
.do

do...
..do..
.do..
.do.
.do..
do..
do...
do...
.do.
.do.
do.
do..

201 99

486 65
1, 265 29

924 63
632 64
632 64
291 99
194 66
194 66

3, 163 22 2, 433 25 1, 445 99 1, 216 62

437 98 389 32

583 98 2, 433 25 1,459 95 1, 216 62

924 63 875 97 924 63

218 99 1, 459 95 2, 433 25 1, 459 95

681 31 486 65 486 65 218 99 184 92

389 32
194 66
194 66
218 99
131 39

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PUBLIC PAWXBROKER AND SAVINGS-BANK.

Manager...
Clerk, first class
Clerks...
Keepers of pledges
Porter.
Servants
Night-guards.

..do....

.do.... ..do.. .do

do. .do.. do...

389 32
170 32
170 32
145 99
48 66

1, 216 62

924 63 437 98 583 98 170 32 170 32 121 66

EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS.
Wages paid to professors, teachers, and others in the Government schools and in the unirers.

ity in Malta.
1Salaries paid are all by the year.)

Occupations.

Salary.

Occupations.

Salary.

UNIVERSITY AND LYCEUM.

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729 97
778 64
583 98
924 63
583 98
583 98
583 98

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Director of education
Clerk, first class
Clerk, second class
Principal of university
Professors:

Theology
Law
Political economy
Medicine
Anatomy and histology
Midwifery
Chemistry

Natural history and forensio 1 medicine

Latin literature.
Italian literature
English literature
Arabic and Oriental languages.

Mathematics and physics. e Logic

Surgery
Dissector
Porter
Keeper of anatomical theater
Teachers of English:
Three

each. One

One...
Teachers of Italian:

One
24 Two
Teachers in

Geometry and mechanics
Latin and Italian
Latin
French
Ancient and modern Greek.
Land surveying and mathe-

matics

583 98
583 98

583 98
1, 459 95

583 98
729 97
583 38
583 98
145 99
194 66
170 32

Inspector..

729 97 Masters : One.

486 65 Three

..each..

137 95 Tvo.

.do..

389 32 Three

.do.

340 65 Five.

..do...

316 32 Four

.do

291 99 Seven

do.

267 65 Three

do.

243 32 Masters of vocal music. .do... $145 99–218 99 Masters of lineal drawing ....do... 145 99–267 65 Masters of wood carving

145 99 Mistresses of schools: One.

486 65 Two

..each..

340 05 Three

..do..

389 32 Four

..do.

267 65 Five.

.do.

243 32 Ten

..do...

218 99 Fonr

.do..

194 66 Two assistant mistresses.... do..

116 79 Ono head-mistress of female school of secondary instruction..

486 65

..do...

583 98 486 65 437 98

583 98 437 98

583 98 486 65 437 98 340 65 340 65

PUBLIC LIBRARY.

Librarian. Assistants.

583 98

1, 119 29 145 99-194 66

* Salaries paid in the university and in the lyceum, where the system of education is more or less collegiate.

+ Wages paid teachers in the village schools.

VARIOUS TRADES.

Wages paid laborers at various occupations in the Island of Malta.

COAL-HEAVERS, OR LABORERS.

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20 10 12 20

Discharging ship's hold to ship's rail
Discharging from ship's rail to lighters..
Discharging from lighters into stores on shore
Discharging from ship rail into store..
Discharging from ship's rail into store, if weighed.
Discharging from store into lighters
Discharging from lighters into bukers (at $4.05 per lighter of 30 tons).
Trimning same in bunkers, $4.86 for 100 tong)..

12

5

These coal men work in gangs, ten in a gang, and work about 100 tons a day, discharging vessels. They average, with constant work (which they seldon get), from $3.04 to $4.86 a man per week. No steam-power is used in handling coal, all the coal being carried in baskets to and from the ships and the lighters and the shore. Lives are frequently lost among the coal-carriers by the laborer falling into the sea of the har. bor wbile crossing the narrow plank from ship to lighter.

SAILMAKERS

earn from 75, cents to 83 cents per day of 10 hours on an average, though when the dock-yard is run to its fullest capacity then the outside sailmakers' daily earnings are slightly in advance of these figures. The dock-yard laborer earns less per day, i. e., from 60 to 70 cents, but his work is generally steadier. The dock-yard is a Government establishment, and the workmen employed in it work sixty hours per week in the summer and fifty-four hours in winter, and for overtime—not exceeding three hours—they are paid 8 cents per hour.

The following list of wages paid workmen of various trades throughout the island was compiled by Mr. James Duncan, a Scotch merchant and shipper of twenty-five years' standing in Malta:

(The average duration of labor per week is usually sixty hours in summer, and fifty-four hours in

winter.)

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In the Maltese island of Gozo the prices paid for labor are as nearly as possible as follows:

The agricultural laborers earn about the same wages as the fieldhands in Malta, averaging, say, from 34 to 42 cents per long day's work.

The lace workers of Gozo (who made by hand most of the celebrated Malta lace that is manufactured in the islands) number about 4,500 women and girls, all working at their own homes in the courts of their houses or in the open air outside. They work by the piece for the shopkeepers of Valletta, who contract for the lace, the latter furnishing patterns and providing the silk, linen, and cotton material needed. They earn from 48 cents to $1.21 each per week, and work on an average of ten hours per day the year round. It is scarcely possible for women to engage in an occupation requiring more persistent, steady, patient ap. plication than Malta lace making. The lace-worker's eyes early show the trying effects of their pursuit, and I conclude, from personal observation, that fully one-fifth of the women and girls engaged in this industry have eye diseases of one kind or another. Their small earnings are all expended in the cost of living and an occasional cheap, high-colored frock and a black silk faldetta for festa days. They eat and drink bread, fish, and wine, very seldom indulging in meats and vegetables, excepting in the shape of soup-like stews hotly seasoned. The cost of

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