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HERBERT, Rev. W., on song of

birds, 221.
HESPERIDE, probable means of

protection of, 176.
Hestuesis, longicorns resembling

ants, 96.
Hestia leuconoë, 180.
Hewitson, Mr., 131.
HIPPARION, 299.
HIPPOTHERIUM, 299.
HISPIDE, imitated by Longicorns,

92.
HOLOTHURIDÆ, 258.
Homalocranium semicinctum, 101.
HOOKER, Dr., on the value of the

“specific term,” 165.
Houses of American and Malay

races contrasted, 213.
HUXLEY, Professor, on “Physical

Basis of Life,” 362; on volition,

368.
HYÆNICTIS, 300.
HYBERNIA, wintry colours of this

[blocks in formation]

genus, 62.

HYMENOPTERA, large number of,

peculiar to Celebes, 196.

ICTERIDÆ, sexual colouring and

nidification of, 244.
ICTHYOPTERYGIA, 298.
Ideopsis daos, 180.
IMITATION, the effects of, in man's

works, 212.
INDIANS, how they travel through

trackless forests, 207.
INSECTS, protective colouring of,

56: mimicking species of other
orders, 97; senses of, perhaps

different from ours, 202, 203.
INSTINCT, how it may be best stu-

died, 201 ; definition of, 203;

LABYRINTHODONTIA, 298,

300.
LAKES as cases of imperfect adapt-

ation, 278.
LANIADÆ, sexual colouring and ni-

dification of, 245.
LAMARCK's hypothesis very dif-

ferent from the author's, 41.
Larentia tripunctaria, 63.
Law which has regulated the in-

troduction of new species, 5;
confirmed by geographical dis-
tribution, 9; high organization
of ancient animals consistent
with, 14; of multiplication in
geometrical progression, 265;

uncon-

of limited populations, 265; of
heredity, 266 ; of variation,
266 ; of change of physical con-
ditions, 266; of the equilibrium
of nature, 266; as opposed to

continual interference, 268.
LAYCOCK, Dr., on law of “

scious intelligence,” 360.
LEAF BUTTERFLY, appearance and

habits of, 59-61.
LEPIDOPTERA, especially subject to

variation, 132.
LEPTALIS, species of mimic Heli-

conidæ, 82; gain a protection

thereby, 259.
LESTER, Mr. J. M., on wood-dove

and robin, 53.
LEVAILLANT, on formation of a

nest, 224.
Limenitis archippus, 88.
Limenitis limire, 172; procris, 172.
LIZARDS refusing certain moths

and caterpillars, 121 ; devour-

ing bees, 121.
LOCAL FORMS, 158.
LOCAL variation of form, 169; of

colour, 173; general remarks
on, 174; in Celebesian butter-

flies, probable use of, 175.
LOCUSTIDÆ, adaptive colouring of,

64.
LUMINOUSNESS of some insects a

protection, 71.
LYCÆNIDÆ, probable means of pro-

tection of, 176.

his origin, 304; unity or plural-
ity of species, 305; persistence
of type of, 306 ; importance of
mental and moral characters,
312; his dignity and supremacy,
324; his influence on nature,
326; his future development,
326; range of intellectual power
in, 339; rudiments of all the
higher faculties in savage, 341 ;
his feet and hands, difficulties
on the theory of natural selec-
tion, 349: his voice, 350; his
mental faculties, 351 ; difficulty
as to the origin of the moral
sense in, 352; development of,
probably directed by a superior

intelligence, 359.
MANTIDÆ, adaptive colouring of,

64; mimicking white ants, 98.
MALACODERMS, a protected group,

93.
MALURIDE, 255.
MATTER, the nature of, 363; Mr.
Bayma on,

363; is force, 365.
MECHANITIS and Methona, mi-

micked by Leptalis, 83.
MECOCERUS, dimorphism of, 155.
Mecocerus gazella, 94.
MEGACEPHALON, 196.
MEGAPODIDÆ, sexual colouring and

nidification of, 246.
MEROPOGON, 196.
Midas dives, 97.
MIMETA, mimicking Tropidorhyn-

chus, 104.
MIMICRY, meaning of the word,

74; theory of, 76; among Lepi-
doptera, 77; how it acts as a
protection, 80, 81 ; of other in-
sects by Lepidoptera, 89; among

MAMMALS, mimicryamong, 107.
Man, does he build by reason or

imitation, 212; his works mainly
imitative, 225; antiquity of, 303,
322; difference of opinion as to

beetles, 91; of other insects by Nemophas grayi, a Longicoru mi-
beetles, 95; of insects by species micked by a Longicorn, 95.
of other orders, 97 ; among the Nests of Birds, why different,
vertebrata, 99; among snakes, 215; of young birds, how built,
101; among tree frogs, 103 ; 219; construction of, described
among birds, 103; among mam by Levaillant, 224; imperfec-
mals, 107; objections to the tions in, 229; influenced by
theory of, 108; by female in changed conditions and per-
sects, 110; among Papilionidæ, sistent habits, 232; classification
179; never occurs in the male of, according to function, 237.
only, 20.

New FORMS, how produced by
MOMOTIDE, sexual colouring and variation and selection, 286.
nidification of, 241.

New Guinea, relation of the seve-
MONTROUZIER, M., on butterflies ral Papuan islands to, 194.

of Woodlark Island, 152. NOCTURNAL animals, colours of,
MORAL sense, difficulty as to the

51.
origin of, 352.

NOMADA, 98.
Morphos, how protected, 73.
Murray, Mr. Andrew, objections OBEREA, species resemble Ten-
to theory of mimicry, 108.

thredinidæ, 96.
MUSCICAPIDE, sexual colouring Odontocera odyneroides, 96.
and nidification of, 245.

ODONTOCHEILA, 97.
MusOPHAGIDÆ, sexual colouring Odynerus sinuatus, 90.
and nidification of, 242.

Onthophilus sulcatus, like a seed,

58.
NAPEOGENES, all the species Onychocerus scorpio, resembles
are mimickers, 85.

bark, 56.
NATURAL selection, the principle ORANGE-TIP butterfly, protective

stated, 41-43; general accept colouring of, 59.
ance of the theory of, 46 ; Orchis, structure of an, explained
tabular demonstration of, 302; by natural selection, 271.
outline of theory of, 307; its Orgyia antiqua and 0. gonostigma,
effects on man and animals dif autumnal colours of, 62.
ferent, 311; hardly acts among ORIOLIDÆ, 253.
civilized societies, 330; what it Ornithoptera priamus, 145, 173;
can not do, 333; cannot pro 0. helena, 173.
duce injurious or useless modi Oxyrhopus petolarius, 0. trigemi-
fications, 334.

nus, O. formosus, 102.
NectarineIDÆ, 254.

Owen, Professor, on more gene-
NECYDALIDÆ, mimic Hymenop ralized structure of extinct ani-
tera, 96.

mals, 298.

PACHYOTRIS fabricii, 96.

mus, 151; P. ormenus, 150, 152,
PACHYRHYNCHI, weevils mimicked 182; P. pammon, 147, 152, 170,
by Longicorns, 95.

180; P. pamphylus, 171; P.
PALEOTHERIUM, 299.

pandion, 152, 180; P. paradoxa,
PALOPLOTHERIUM, 299.

87, 179; P. peranthus, 160, 171;
Papilio, black and red group imi P. pertinax, 145; P. philoxenus,
tated, 84.

182; P. polydorus, 88, 170, 182;
Papilio achates, 147; P. adaman P. polytes, 147, 148; P. rhesus,

tius, 171 ; P. ænigma, 87; P. 171; P. romulus, 87, 148, 150,
agamemnon, 141, 158, 170, 171 ; 183; P. sarpedon, 141, 158, 171;
P. agestor, 180; P. alphenor, P. sataspes, 171; P. severus,
148, 169; P. amanga, 151 ; P. 140, 144; P. theseus, 87, 148,
androcles, 171 ; P.androgeus, 88, 150, 169, 170, 171, 180, 183: P.
147, 180, 183; P. antiphates, thule, 179; P. torquatus, 156 ;
141, 171 ; P. antiphus, 87, 150, P. turnus, 152; P. ulysses, 140,
170, 180, 183; P. aristeus, 171; 160, 173; P. varuna, 88.
P. arjuna, 141 ; P. ascalaphus, PAPILIONID, the question of their
171; P. autolycus, 160; P.bathy rank, 133 ; peculiar characters
cles, 141; P. blumei, 171; P. possessed by, 134; peculiarly
brama, 171; P. caunus, 87, 179; diurnal, 136; compared with
P. codrus, 160, 171 ; P. cöon, 88,

groups of mammalia, 138; dis-
146, 180, 182; P. deiphobus, 140; tribution of, 140; large forms
P. deiphontes, 171 ; P. delessertii, of Celebes and Moluccas, 168 ;
180; P. demolion, 171; P. diphi large forms of Amboyna, 169;
lus, 87, 170, 180, 183; P. double local variation of form, 169;
dayi, 88, 180; P. elyros, 148; P. arrangement of, 186; geogra-
encelades, 171; P. erectheus, 151 ; phical distribution of, 189; of
P. euripilus, 160; P. evemon, Indo-Malay and Austro-Malay
159; P. gigon, 171 ; P. glaucus, regions, 192; of Java, Suma-
152; P. hector, 87, 150, 180, 183; tra, and Borneo, 193.
P. helenus, 160, 171 ; P. hospi-

Paridæ, sexual colouring and nidi-
ton, 178; P. ideoides, 180; P.

fication of, 243.
jason, 159, 171; P. ledebouria,

PASSENGER pigeon, cause of its
148; P. leucothoë, 171 ; P.leoda-

great numbers, 308.
mas, 170; P. liris, 87, 180, 184 ;
P. macareus, 179; P. machaon,

Patent inventions, as illustrating
178; P. melanides, 148, 150 ; P.

classification, 295.
memnon, 88, 140, 146, 147, 152,

l'hacellocera batesii, mimics one of
180, 183; P. milon, 171; P. ne-

the Anthribidæ.
phelus, 140; P, nicanor, 170; P Phalaropus fulicarius, 115, 251.
ænomaus, 88, 180, 184; P. onesi PHASMIDÆ, imitate sticks and

RACES, or subspecies, 160; of

man, origin of, 319.
REDBREAST and woodpigeon, pro-

tective colouring of, 53, 54.
REPRESENTATIVE groups, 9; of Tro-

gons, butterflies, &c., 12.
REPTILES, protective colouring of,

54.
RHAMPHASTIDÆ, sexual colouring

and nidification of, 242.
RHINOCEROS, 299.
River system, as illustrating self-

adaptation, 276.
Roses, Mr. Baker on varieties of,

165.
RUDIMENTARY organs, 23.

twigs, 64; females resembling

leaves, 112.
PHYLLIUM, wonderful protective

colour and form of, 64.
PHYSALIA, 258.
PIERIDÆ, local modification of

form in, 172.
Pieris, females only imitating

Heliconidæ, 112.
Pieris coronis, 172; eperia, 172.
Pieris pyrrha, 113.
Picidæ, sexual colouring and nidi-

fication of, 242.
PIPRIDÆ, sexual colouring and

nidification of, 245.
PittiDÆ, 253.
Pliocerus equalis, 101 ; P. elapoides,

P. euryzonus, 102.
Pæciloderma terminale, 93.
POLARITY, Forbes' theory of, 17,

45.
POLYMORPHISM, 145; illustration

of, 157.
POPULATION of species, law of, 28;

does not permanently increase,
29; not determined by abun-
dance of offspring, 29; checks
to, 30; difference in the case of

cats and rabbits explained, 32.
PREVISION, a case of, 122.
Prioniturus, 196.
PROTECTION, various modes in

which animals obtain it, 69-71,
258 ; greater need of, in female

insects and birds, 113.
PROTECTIVE colouring, theory of,

65.
Psittaci (Parrots), sexual colour-

ing and nidification of, 242.
PTEROSAURIA, 298.
PTYCHIODERES, 94.

SALVIN, Mr. Osbert, on a case of

bird mimicry, 107.
Saturnia pavonia-minor, protective

colouring of larva of, 63.
SATYRIDÆ, probable means of pro-

tection of, 176.
SAUROPTERYGIA, 299.
SAVAGES, why they become extinct,

319; undeveloped intellect of,
339, 341; intellect of, compared
with that of animals, 341, 343;
protect their backs from rain,

346.
SCANSORIAL birds, nests of, 238.
SCAPHURA, 98.
SCISSIROSTRUM, 165.
SCOPULIPEDES, brush-legged bees,

91.
SCUDDER, Mr.,on fossil insects, 301.
SCUTELLERIDÆ, mimicked by Long-

icorns, 96.
Sesia bombiliformis, 90.
SESIIDE, mimic Hymenoptera, 90.
Sexes, comparative importance of,

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