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This leads me to consider,
II. THE PARTICULAR MODIFICATIONS OF THE

SPIRIT OF THE WORLD.

For, besides the general spirit of it which we, have been considering, there are particular determinations of this spirit, which incessantly vary according to times, places, and circumstances. Like the tide, the course of the world ever rolls on, but in different directions and different channels. Some streams may be choked up, as others are opened; the flood in some places may flow wider and deeper than in others, But these variations do not materially affect our preceding observations. Man is the same, the law of God the same, the nature of sin, and the designs of the tempter the same. It is only necessary to trace the governing principle, the system and the object of a worldly life, and we shall find it to be essentially the same under every apparent dissimilarity.

Thus, if we regard CHRISTENDOM GENERALLY, we must allow that the public profession of Christianity, the progress of civilization, and the several laws and usages consequent upon them, have considerably altered the course of the world from what it was when heathen idolatry, or Jewish pride and superstition, opposed with undisguised malice the name and purposes of the Saviour, Some sins, once not disreputable, are now held in abomination.

Some duties,

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especially those of benevolence, are now so creditable and popular, that they are generally extolled and pretended to. Christian laws, education, and information have had an influence on the standard of moral and religious sentiments and feelings. Still a worldly life, though somewhat varied in its form, is in its substance the same. The corrupt heart still cherishes its cold indifference, its folly and levity, its vice and carnality. The distinction between the world and the spiritual and invisible church of Christ is as real now as it was in the days of the Apostles, and the passages of Scripture which refer to it may be applied to us in the present day with strong, and in all the main points, with unabated force.

IN OUR OWN COUNTRY, again, the course of the world has been greatly altered by that pure light of the Gospel which shines in our reformed church, by our "higli notions of civil and religious freedom, by the enterprising spirit of our people, and by the great progress of general reading and information amongst all classes. He however who thinks himself free from a worldly spirit because he is rot superstitious, ignorant, rude, credulous, uncourteous ; or be-, cause he observes some religious duties, 'or because he is free from notorious profligacy, or because he believes and defends the national Protestant creed, may greatly deceive himself.

This leads me to consider,
II. THE PARTICULAR MODIFICATIONS OF THE

SPIRIT OF THE WORLD.

For, besides the general spirit of it wbich we bave been considering, there are particular determinations of this spirit, which incessantly vary according to times, places, and circumstances. Like the tide, the course of the world ever rolls on, but in different directions and different channels. Some streams may be choked up, as others are opened; the flood in some places may flow wider and deeper than in others, But these variations do not materially affect our preceding observations. Man is the same, the law of God the same, the nature of sin, and the designs of the tempter the same. It is only necessary to trace the governing principle, the system and the object of a worldly life, and we shall find it to be essentially the same under every apparent dissimilarity.

Thus, if we regard CHRISTENDOM GENERALLY, we must allow that the public profession of Christianity, the progress of civilization, and the several laws and usages consequent upon them, have considerably altered the course of the world from what it was when heathen idolatry, or Jewish pride and superstition, opposed with undisguised malice the name and purposes of the Saviour, Some sins, once not disreputable, are now held in abomination. Some duties,

tespecially those of benevolence, are now so creditable and popular, that they are generally extolled and pretended to. Christian laws, education, and information have had an influence on the standard of moral and religious sentiments and feelings. Still a worldly life, though somewhat varied in its form, is in its substance the samne. The corrupt heart still cherishes its cold indifference, its folly and levity, its vice and carnality. The distinction between the world and the spiritual and invisible church of Christ is as real now as it was in the days of the Apostles, and the passages of Scripture which refer to it may be applied to us in the present day with strong, and in all the main points, with unabated force.

IN OUR OWN COUNTRY, again, the course of the world has been greatly altered by that pure light of the Gospel which shines in our reformed church, by our higli notions of civil and religious freedom, by the enterprising spirit of our people, and by the great progress of general reading and information amongst all classes. He however who thinks himself free from a worldly spirit because be is not superstitious, ignorant, rude, credulous, uncourteous; or be. cause he observes some religious duties, 'or because he is free from notorious profligacy, or because he believes and defends the national Protestant creed, may greatly deceive himself.

The course of the world may flow here in another channel. He may be free from the fashionable errors and vices of the sixteenth century, to which he has little temptation ; but he may be entangled in those of his own. A false candour, fastidiousness, pride, insubordination, unbounded personal expense, inordinate appetite for pleasure, gross selfishness, sober sensuality, vanity of knowledge, daring criticisin on sacred subjects, sceptical speculations in philosophy, an adulation of talents however perverted, a contempt for real spiritual religion, an indifference to the peculiar doctrines and self-denying duties of Christianity, a rage for amusements, and a love of display, are at least as dangerous now, as credulity and superstition were three cena

turies ago.

Still further varieties in the course of the world are created by THE CLASS OF SOCIETY in which we happen to move. Each of these has its peculiar pretensions. The philosophers have their world, where a lofty pretence to wisdom and virtue unconnected with religion, is commonly in vogue. The statesmen have theirs, where political intrigue, the interests of party, and of personal ambition, are too apt to prevail; where religion is chiefly consigned to the low and uneducated, and is treated as little more than an engine of state to restrain the multitude, whilst public talent and address are deem

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