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MANCHESTER:
PRINTED AT THE “GUARDIAN” STEAM-PRINTING OFFICES, 3, CROSS STREET.

1861.

13.4.1900 VIBRADO

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It is now thirty years since the British Association for the Advancement of Science held its first meeting in the city of York. Like most great and meritorious enterprises, it had a comparatively humble beginning; but its originators were brave, earnest men, who unflinchingly adhered, in good report and in evil report, to their noble scheme, which was designed “to give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry,—to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate science in different parts of the British Empire with one another, and with foreign philosophers,—and to obtain a more general attention to the objects of science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress." It is not too much to say that, ever since 1831, the Association has steadily applied itself to the fulfilment of this useful mission, that its history up to the present time is a record of progressive success in the objects it contemplates,—and that in each successive year, it has acquired additional power and influence. As we have stated, the first session of this distinguished body was held at York, in 1831 ; Lord Fitzwilliam, President. Meeting AND PLACE. PRESIDENT. , MeetING AND Place.

PRESIDENT. The 2nd was held at Oxford ............... Dr. Buckland. The 17th at Oxford ..... ............. Sir. R. H. Inglis. The 3rd at Cambridge..... ............. Professor Sedgwick. The 18th at Swansea ...... The Marquis of Northampton. The 4th at Edinburgh .................. Sir T. M. Brisbane. The 19th at Birmingham ..... .............. Dr. Robinson. The 5th at Dublin ................................. Dr. Lloyd. The 20th at Edinburgh..................Sir David Brewster. The 6th at Bristol. ...........................Lord Lansdowne. The 21st at Ipswich ............... The Astronomer Royal. The 7th at Liverpool........................Lord Burlington. | The 22nd at Belias

.......Lord Burlington. The 22nd at Belfast........Colonel (now General) Sabine. The 8th at Newcastle-on-Tyne ...... The Duke of North- The 23rd at Hull ........

... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....Mr. Hopkins. umberland. The 24th at Liverpool......................... Lord Harrowby. The 9th at Birmingham...The Rev. W. Vernon Harcourt. The 25th at Glasgow .................. The Duke of Argyll. The 10th at Glasgow......... The Marquis of Breadalbane. The 26th at Cheltenham..........................Dr. Daubeny. The 11th at Plymouth ........................ Dr. Whewell. The 27th at Dublin .....

...............Dr. Lloyd. The 12th at Manchester..................... Lord Ellesmere. The 28th at Leeds ...... .............. Professor Owen. The 13th at Cork ........

........... Lord Rosse. The 29th at Aberdeen .................. The Prince Consort. The 14th at York ......... The late Dean Peacock, of Ely. The 30th at Oxford . ............... Lord Wrottesley. The 15th at Cambridge ................ Sir John Herschel. The 31st at Manchester............. Mr. William Fairbairn. The 16th at Southampton ...... Sir Roderick Murchison.'

Cambridge has been selected for the meeting of next year, the Presidential chair to be occupied by Professor Willis.

In 1831, as appears from the official records, the Association commenced a system of grants of money, for scientific purposes. The sum paid in that year in this way, was a very modest one, £20. Next year, it was £167; in 1836, it mounted up to £434. 14s.£ 8. d.

£ 8. d, In 1837 it was .................. 918 14 6

In 1849.

159 19 6
In 1838...

956 12 2
In 1850.

345 18 0
In 1839.

1,595 11 0
In 1851,

391 97 In 1840...

1,546 16
In 1852.

304 6 7
In 1841..

1,235
10 u
In 1853.

205 0 0
In 1842..

1,449 17 8
In 1854.

380 197 In 1843..

1.565 10 2
In 1855.

480 16 4
In 1844.

981 12 8
In 1856.

734 13 9
In 1845.

830 9 9
In 1857.

507 15 4
In 1846...

685 16 0
In 1858.

618 18 2
In 1847....

208 5 4
In 1859.

684 11 1
In 1848.....

275 1 8
In 1860.

1,241 7 0 While, in the year 1860-61, the outlay for scientific purposes was upwards of £1,100. This gives the large total of more than £20,000, expended under the direction of a body necessarily better fitted than any other in this country to suggest and control investigations in the interest of science.

The Manchester meeting of 1861 has been a marked success. Taking the average of thirty years, the number of members at each annual gathering may be set down at 1,600, and the receipts at something under £2,000. The present meeting, however, boasts upwards of 3,000 members, and receipts to the amount of £3,920. In 1842, when the Association first honoured Manchester with a visit, the number of members was 1,316, and the amount of the receipts £2,161. Looking, therefore, at attendance and revenue, the Association and Manchester must be congratulated upon the results of the meeting just brought to a close; and it is only necessary to scan the contents of this little volume to find satisfactory evidence of the high value of the papers which have been read, and of the discussions which have taken place, in the various sections.

SEPTEMBER, 1861.

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