General Sketch of the History of Pantheism, 2. köide

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Page 276 - Rhodora! if the sages ask thee why This charm is wasted on the earth and sky, Tell them, dear, that if eyes were made for seeing, Then Beauty is its own excuse for being: Why thou wert there, O rival of the rose! I never thought to ask, I never knew: But, in my simple ignorance, suppose The self-same power that brought me there brought you.
Page 309 - Whither shall I go then from thy Spirit ? or whither shall I go then from thy presence ? If I climb up into heaven, thou art there ; if I go down to hell, thou art there also.
Page 86 - For can there be a nicer strain of abstraction than to distinguish the existence of sensible objects from their being perceived, so as to conceive them existing unperceived? Light and colours, heat and cold, extension and figures — in a word the things we see and feel — what are they but so many sensations, notions, ideas, or impressions on the sense ? and is it possible to separate, even in thought, any of these from perception? For my part, I might as easily divide a thing from itself.
Page 309 - THE sun, the moon, the stars, the seas, the hills and the plains — Are not these, O Soul, the Vision of Him who reigns? Is not the Vision He ? tho" He be not that which He seems ? Dreams are true while they last, and do we not live in dreams ? Earth, these solid stars, this weight of body and limb, Are they not sign and symbol of thy division from Him...
Page 86 - ... all those bodies which compose the mighty frame of the world, have not any subsistence without a mind ; that their being is to be perceived or known ; that consequently so long as they are not actually perceived by me, or do not exist in my mind, or that of any other created spirit, they must either have no existence at all, or else subsist in the mind of some Eternal Spirit...
Page 71 - Thus men, extending their inquiries beyond their capacities, and letting their thoughts wander into those depths where they can find no sure footing, it is no wonder that they raise questions and multiply disputes, which, never coming to any clear resolution, are proper only to continue and increase their doubts, and to confirm them at last in perfect scepticism.
Page 308 - Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet— Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.
Page 309 - I," — ah, what words have we for such things? — is a breath of Heaven; the Highest Being reveals himself in man. This body, these faculties, this life oi ours, is it not all as a vesture for that Unnamed? 'There ' is but one Temple in the Universe,' says the devout Novalis,
Page 220 - The aspect of nature is devout. Like the figure of Jesus, she stands with bended head, and hands folded upon the breast. The happiest man is he who learns from nature the lesson of worship.

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