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CHAP. IV.

EMINENT CHARACTERS TYPICAL OF CHRIST.

1. AD AM. 2. MELCHIZEDEK. 3. ISAAC AND ISMAEL. 4. ISAAC. 5. JOSEPH. 6. MOSES. MARAH. MANNA. MASSAH AND MERIBAH. THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 7. AARON. 8. ELIE JAH. 9. DAVID AND SOLOMON. SOLOMON'S SONG COMPARED WITH OTHER SPECIL

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Chrifts

THE life and office of the Messiah are Eminent not only described by the ceremonial ob- typical of servances of the Law, but they are also darkly exhibited in a long succession of typical characters, from the very beginning of the world. In the shadows of the Jewish church, the chosen people of God beheld the realities of the Gospel ; and in the most illustrious of the Patriarchs, they contemplated the attributes of the expected Saviour of the world. The Lord of Life has now accomplished his miffion, and has clearly shewn himself to be the end of the Law of Moses. The obscurity of the Levitical dispensation is removed, and all the

ancient

K 3

sect. ancient Scriptures are found to preach the

advent of a suffering Redeemera.

II.

1. Adam.

1. The first typical delineation of Chrift occurs in the very beginning of the Pentateuch. As Adam is the head of the natural world, fo is Christ of the spiritual; consequently, by exactly inverting the character of Adam, we obtain a complete description of the character of Chrift. Death was the result of Adam's transgression ; life everlasting is the fruit of Christ's perfect obedience. The first Adam was made a living foul ; the last Adam a quickening spirit. As the one was prior to the other in point of time; so does the natural state of man precede his fpiritual regeneration. All men bear the image of the earthy; and all real Christians bear the image of the heavenly. For, as Adam is the natural father of the whole human species; so 'is Christ the spiritual father of many children

2. The next type of Christ, which demands our attention, is the singular character of Melchizedek, King of Salem, the

2. Melchizedek.

Luke xxiv. 27.

I Cor. xv, 21.

Priest

Priett of the most high God. No mention CHAP. is made in Scripture either of the parents iv. or descendants of this prince; yet, even Abraham, the father of the faithful, owned his superior dignịty by paying him tithes of all, and by accepting his blessing. Melchizedek, on the other hand, refreshed the fpirits of Abraham, when exhausted by temporal warfare, with bread and wine ; as Christ does, to this day, hiş fpiritual church militant, with the very fame sacramental elements.

The argument, which St. Paul deduces from the circumstances attending this typical character, is, that the Christian difpensation must be of a superior nature to the Mofaical, because Abraham, in whose loins Levi the ancestor of Moses was, owned the superiority of Melchizedek, the type of Christ, by paying tithes to him, and by accepting his blessing. Confequently, if Abraham was his inferior, all his posterity must be so likewise, and among them the Sons of Levi, who composed the Jewish priesthood. It appears, as if St. Paul meant to have entered more

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II.

SECT. particularly into the typical resemblance

between Melchizedek and the Messiah, but was deterred from it, by the spiritual dulness of the persons to whom his Epistle is addressed." Christ is “ called of God, an

High-Priest after the order of Melchize« dek. Of whom we have many things “ to say, and hard to be uttered, seeing ye “ are dull of hearing. For when for the “ time ye ought to be teachers, ye have "need that one teach you again which be “ the first principles of the oracles of - God d.

It has been supposed, and not without some degree of probability, that Melchizedek was even more than a mere type ; that he was a visible manifestation of the Son of God. Without venturing to decide upon fo obfcure a subject, there is no reafon to doubt of the frequent corporeal appearance of the Messiah, during the period of the Patriarchal and Levitical dispensations. Whatever sentiments are entertained respecting the mysterious character of Melchizedek, his illustrious antitype feems evidently to be the person spoken

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of in the Hebrew Scriptures, under the chap. name of the Angel Jehovaho.

IV.

3. Isaac and Ismael.

3. We are informed by the same inspired teacher, that the two sons of Abraham were typical of the Law and the Gospel. “ It is written, that Abraham had “ two sons, the one by a bond-maid, the “ other by a free-woman. But he, who “ was of the bond-woman, was born after " the flesh: but he of the free-woman

was by promise. Which things are an “ allegory : for these are the two co

venants ; the one from the mount Sinai, "" which gendereth to bondage, which is

Agar. For this Agar is mount Sinai “ in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem «« which now is, and is in bondage with “ her children. But Jerusalem, which is

above, is free, which is the mother of us " all. Now we, brethren, as Ifaac was,

are the children of promise."

It
may

be obferved, in addition to the foregoing declaration of St. Paul, that as Ismael was born first, and then Isaac; so

• See Gen. xviii. xxxii. 30. and xlviii. 16. Exod. iii. 2. and xiv. 19, 24. Judges ii. Dan. iii. 25,

&c. { Galat. iv.

22.

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