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Memoir.

Many besides Churchmen will regret the death of Canon Liddon. He had become so universally recognised as our greatest preacher and theologian, that, although a leading member of the High Church party, he was regarded by all sorts and conditions of Christians as the chief exponent of Christian doctrine. As is already known, he died at Westonsuper-Mare, on Tuesday morning, September 9th, at the house of his brother, where he had gone for change of air. He had previously been staying with his sister at Standish Court, Stoneham. But it was deemed advisable to move him to Weston on the Friday before, and, although the journey fatigued him, no symptoms more serious than usual were manifested. Indeed, he was able to take a daily carriage drive, and on the morning of his death partook of breakfast apparently in no worse health than on the previous day. Soon afterwards, however, he was found in a fainting condition, and before medical aid could be procured he had expired. The sad news was conveyed to the Canon in Residence at St. Paul's Cathedral (Canon H. Scott Holland) in a telegram from one of the neices of the great preacher, which ran briefly: “ My uncle died suddenly this morning.”

Henry Parry Liddon was born at North Stoneham, in Hampshire, and was the eldest son of Captain Matthew Liddon, R.N., who commanded Her Majesty's Ship The Griper in the expedition under Sir Edward Parry in search of the North-West Passage. Sir Edward Parry was the boy's godfather, and soon after his birth Captain Liddon moved to Colyton, in Devonshire, and much of H. P. Liddon's youth was spent with an aunt at Taunton. He was born in 1829, and had, therefore, barely completed his sixty-first year at the time of his death. He received his early education at King's College School, and in the year 1847 he was nominated a student of Christ Church. Those who recollect him as an undergraduate speak of him as having been already keenly interested in religion, and as having professed himself a loyal follower of the Tractarian leaders—men whose influence, though it had been momentarily checked by the secession of Newman, was still very considerable. The young student of Christchurch was especially brought in contact with Pusey, and also, away from Oxford, with the

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