Proceedings of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, 13–15. köide

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The Society, 1874
 

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Page 9 - Now the rate of this diffusion has been shown from various considerations to depend on two things : — 1. The natural internal diffusion of the fluid when at rest. 2. The eddies caused by visible motion which mixes the fluid up and continually brings fresh particles into contact with the surface.
Page 35 - I am nearly persuaded that the circumstance depends upon the weight and number of the ultimate particles of the several gases : those whose particles are lightest and single being least absorbable, and the others more according as they increase in weight and complexity...
Page 8 - The heat carried off by air or any fluid from a surface, apart from the effect of radiation, is proportional to the internal diffusion of the fluid at and near the surface...
Page 77 - Dalton, most of which, however, consists of electrical apparatus, models of mechanical powers, models of steam-engines, air-pumps, a Gregorian telescope, and other apparatus of a similar kind, which was either bought or presented to him. It has not been thought necessary to exhibit these, but rather to show the home-made apparatus with which Dalton obtained his most remarkable results. I. Meteorological and Physical Apparatus made and used by Dr. Dalton. Throughout his life Dalton devoted much time...
Page 84 - There can be no doubt, the author believes, that this chasm has been formed by the chemical action of carbonic acid in water, and that it has attacked this particular spot either from the unusual softness of the rock originally situated here, or because there was here a joint or shrinkage in the strata. There is nothing, however, in the position of Elden Hole to lead one to suppose that any stream has ever flowed through it ; no signs of such a state of things appear anywhere around.
Page 77 - The apparatus employed by John Dalton in his classical researches, whether physical or chemical, was of the simplest, and even of the rudest, character. Most of it was made with his own hands, and that which is to be exhibited has been chosen as illustrating this fact, and as indicating the genius which with so insignificant and incomplete an experimental equipment was able to produce such great results. The Society has in its possession a large quantity of apparatus used by Dalton, most of which,...
Page 35 - An inquiry into the relative weights of the . . ultimate particles of bodies is a subject, as far as I know, entirely new : I have lately been prosecuting this enquiry with remarkable success. The principle cannot be entered upon in this paper ; but I shall just subjoin the results, as far as they appear to be ascertained by my experiments.
Page 38 - ... equal quantities of carbon only half as much hydrogen as marsh gas. This conclusion doubtless expressed the results of Dalton's own experiments upon these two gases, which were made, as we know from himself, in the summer of the year 1804. He proved that neither of these gases contained anything besides carbon and hydrogen, and ascertained, by exploding with oxygen in a Volta's eudiometer, that if we reckon the carbon in each the same, then carburetted hydrogen contains exactly twice as much...
Page 128 - ... through the hill which separates the Red Bank and Mahoning creek, a distance of two and a half to three miles at this point, and come *Mr. Binney, FRS, has been for many years investigating the structure...
Page 21 - A three inch lens, C, of 12 inches focal length is attached by means of a rod to the cubical chamber so as to move with it. The nature of this attachment will be seen in the figure. Thus the whole instrument may be easily moved into such a position that the lens as well as the upper side of the chamber which is parallel to the plane of the lens may face the sun, and an image of the sun be thrown through a hole, D, in the side of the chamber upon the thermometer bulb, E.

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