A Prodigal Son, 1. köide

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Hurst and Blackett, 1863

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Page 140 - Certainly a man has a right to do what he likes with his own, but then every man who does so must make up his mind to certain little penalties.
Page 44 - Thank you," said the doctor, looking very happy and pleased ; " they are very well. But as for children ! Time has been going on with you, and he hasn't been stopping with other people. I'm sure Vi wouldn't let you call her a child, and I don't think Madge would either ; or perhaps I ought to say, rather, that I am sure Madge wouldn't, and I have grave doubts about Vi; for I believe it is always the youngest who are the most peremptory on these matters ; and little Madge is now — let me...
Page 40 - I won't, my boy ; I won't. But we've often thought of you — often — wondering what had become of you — what you were doing." "And what have I done all the while?" the young man cried, bitterly. " What have I done? No good, you may be sure of that." " Hush ! hush ! don't speak so now. All that's over now, you know. You're home again in your father's house. Bygones are to be bygones now. You were a mere boy when you went away. You are only a young man now. There's a long life before you — a...
Page 48 - ... heavy cornices. Every now and then, as a flame flickered in the grate, you could trace the dim outlines of a large allegorical painting, much dimmed and clouded by years, amongst the raised ornaments of the ceiling. But the colours were not very strong now, the drawing in places was quite undefinable, and much of the gilding of the portions in relief was very dull and black. On a high, carved, four-post bedstead, with heavy, dull crimson hangings, old Mr. Hadfield was stretched at length, breathing...
Page 295 - Bgure, carefully dressed. He always wore black, a complete suit, with a dress coat, a stiff, white neckerchief, and a frilled shirt adorned with a large brooch. A man came regularly to shave him early in the morning, after which he breakfasted in a superb brocaded dressing-gown ; then he read the paper scrupulously ; at mid-day he assumed the whitest cravat, and thrust his neat feet into the brightest boots that could be discovered for miles.
Page 63 - ... swine, and been fain to eat of their husks ? Have you been like to perish with hunger ? Is it for these reasons you come home, poor and penitent, to be as a hired servant, and to have bread enough and to spare ? No ! You have lived proudly and defiantly enough — the first part of the Prodigal's career, not the second. You have wasted your substance, you have rioted, you have spared yourself no enjoyment, your life has been a list of pleasures. Profligate, gambler, yes, and — I see it now,...
Page 16 - Nobody liked this question. They shirked it ; they shrugged their shoulders ; they looked hard at the ceiling. They passed on the inquiry — they said: "Ah! why, indeed?" and each looked as though he expected some one else to answer. He was a fine young fellow ; they were all agreed as to that. A very fine young fellow. A handsome boy, with a bright dark eye, and black hair, as thick as a horse's tail. Farmer Corbet had a story to tell about the young gentleman coming over the hedge, in among his...
Page 62 - ... tar barrels lighted, and oxen roasted whole. That was the plan you had laid out for yourself. To each of us you had assigned our parts of homage and affection and regard for you. We were to welcome with acclamations one who had brought shame and dishonour upon our race." Wilford darted a strange glance of suspicion at his father. He bit his lips till the blood came, but he said nothing. " To be greeted like the Prodigal on his return, you must have suffered like the Prodigal. Have you been in...
Page 47 - ... he is almost violent ; his strength seems to return to him for the occasion, and he permits himself to be strangely moved and excited. These paroxysms, for so I may almost call them — are very bad for him. You know something of his temper, of old. Age and illness have not bettered it. Be temperate with him, my dear boy. Don't irritate him. Say as little as possible. For your own sake, as well as his, don't offend him again — don't do that. Be careful, my dear boy. God prosper you. " The doctor...
Page 59 - Tell me what you would have me do or say." " Tell me how these seven years have been passed. In sorrow ? in suffering ? or in the most shameful profligacy and sin ?" Wilford cowered and turned away. " Seven years ! A long apprenticeship to serve with the Devil. You may well be tired of the service — glad to come back to England, to Grilling Abbots, for a change. Perhaps, too, your money has run out — your poor mother's money. She had power to will it to you, and she did wUl it to you.

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