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THE PATHFINDER,

A JOURNAL

OF

PURE THEISM AND RELIGIOUS

FREETHOUGHT.

CONDUCTED BY

P. W. PERFITT.

VOLUME V.

NEW SERIES; VOLUME I.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY M. PATTIE, 31, PATERNOSTER ROW,

AND

GEORGE GLAISHER, 470, NEW OXFORD STREET,

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PRINTED BY WILLIAM OSTELL, HART STREET, BLOOMSBURY.

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CONTENTS.

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PAGE. Apocryphal Narratives of " Jesus 'in Egypt”

97 Apologists, Butler and the . 113 Bhagavad Gita, and Modern Faith 177 Buddha, Life and Teachings of :§ 1. Sacred Buddhist books and dates

216 § 2. Early Life of Sakya (Buddha)

232 § 3. Sakya quitting bis

home and friends 247 § 4. The Liberation of the Thinker

249 § 5. Final Emancipation of Sakya :

- 263 § 6. Sakya and his early teaching

280 § 7. Sakya and his Sermon style

310 § 8. Sakya and his Doctri. nal System

330 s 9. Sakya and the Buddhist Hells

347 § 10. Sakya upon Human Equality

- 363 11. Death of Sakya - - 379 12. The Overthrow of Indian Buddhism

- 407 Canon of the New Testament 49 Characteristics of the Reformation:

I. The Dark Ages 4 II. The Church of the Dark Ages ·

19 III. The Dawning of Light.

35 IV. Berenger

V. T'he Schoolmen 68 VI. Abelard

83 VII. The Contest of Rea

son and Authority 100 VIJI. Languedoc ; the

Land of Heresy · 116

PAGE. IX. Peter Waldus - 132 X. The Heretics of Languedoc

148 XI. The Albigensian Crusade

. 164 XII. “Saint” Dominic 181 XIII. Establishment of the

Inquisition - - 197 XIV. Spiritual Terrorism. 213

XV. St. Francis of Assisi 228 XVI. The Early Francis. cans

and their Work

243 XVII. TheMendicant Monks 260 XVIII. The Fraticelli and

their New Evangel 276 XIX. Dolcino and Priestly

Vengeance - 292 XX, Fanaticism, Supersti,

tion, and Spiritual Beggary

- 307 XXI. Wycliffe

- 327 XXII. The Age of Wycliffe 343 XXIII. Parliament and Convocation

360 XXIV. Wycliffe as the Reformer

376 XXV. Character and Death

of Wycliffe - · 392 Charitable Institutions

· 145 Charity and the Claims of the Poor, A Lecture, 138, 154, 171, 184,

203 Christianity, Notice of Debate on 11 Christna and Christianity before Christ

. 161 Confucius, Life and Doctrines

52

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§ 1. The Birth and its

Wonders § 2. Boyhood, Student Life,

and Marriage § 3. The Morning of Life

23

38

and its Lessons

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167

Law of Change and its difficulties 17
Lectures at South Place Chapel :-
The Psalms of David,' 13, 28,

45, 61, 77, 92
The Life and Career of So-
lomon, 109, 125, 142, 158,

174, 189, 207, 219, 238
The “Song of Solomon," '253,

142, 158, 174, 189, 207, 219, 238,
“Song of Solomon,” The, 253, 270,

285, 300, 316, 334

270, 285, 300, 316, 334

The Book of Ecclesiastes, 350,

365, 382, 397, 410

The Church and the Brimstone

Business

1

Thcology and Religious Progress 236

Witchcraft and the Church 225
Witchcraft: The Witch Sabbath- 283
Witchcraft and its Overthrow - 298

Miracles and the Power of Nature 313

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6

THE CHURCH AND THE BRIMSTONE BUSINESS. The laws of fashion strike much deeper root than ordinary men are accustomed to believe. Many imagine that it is merely a matter of dress, dinner, and dancing—a sort of God which presides over the adornments and amusements of life; but having nothing to do with either business or religion. This is a

popular error ' for the sceptre of fashion is wielded over the counter and the desk quite as successfully as in the ball-rooms of the West End. There is as much done according to the fashion in Cheapside as in Regent Street, the only difference being, that in the former case it is called by another name. In religion, also, fashion exerts its authority, sometimes in connection with the dress of the worshippers, and at others as determining the form and spirit of the discourses. Is there not a fashionable religious cravat so spotlessly white, and so elegantly tied ? The truly spiritual' always wear them, but seldom succeed in getting them on without praying for the washerwoman. Are not the wearers quite as particular about the style of bow and the arrangement of the ends, as the attendants of Almack's are about the arrangement of their head-furniture. How oft it happens that a 'spiritual 'young man’ is late at church through not not having been able to get his cravat tied! Here, however, we confess to the weakness of never being able to look upon those pious neckcloths without mentally inquiring which was engaged the longest before the glass--the Reverend Timothy Sleek of Little Zion, or John Bowlegs the footman. The neck-gear of both is elegantly arranged, but probably the footman, assisted by Betty the housemaid, beats the divine in the rapid movement of his fingers.

It is not to that, however, we desire now to draw the attention of our readers, but to the power of fashion in determining the kind of doctrine which is to be preached. In our young days it was a rule among the clergy to deal largely in brimstone. Their sermons, invariably had the brimstone odour, and what they lacked in argument they made up in pictorial effects, which, for their power to influence the hearers depended largely on burning brimstone. The preacher that did not, and would not trade in this commodity, soon found his establishment deserted, for when hearers had an appetite for it there was the certainty of their going to those divinity shops in which it was supplied. But all at once, and in a very remarkable manner, which no one has yet fully Vol. V, New SERIES, VOL. I.

B

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