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Jator." (marg.) Dan. ix. 25—27. Our only remark on this, at present, is, that the prophet evidently refers to the Romans as the people of the prince that shall come,” and to the destruction of Jerusalem and the temple by that of “ the City and the Sanctuary,” together with the continuance of their desolation - for the overspreading of abominations.” But although the Saviour clearly refers to this destruction of the city, and warns his followers to escape when they should see the period arrive, it is difficult to conceive how any should have thought of applying to that event what he afterwards states respecting his Coming, in answer to the second question of his disciples. Such a misapplication is the more surprising, as he has carefully guarded against false ideas of the nature of his coming. Having predicted a period of the greatest tribulation that ever was or shall be, He warns them in the 24th verse, against false Christs and false prophets who shall arise, and adds, “ Wherefore, if they shall say unto you, Behold He is in the Desert, go not forth: Behold He is in the secret chambers, believe it not; FOR, [this is the reason why they are not to go into the desert seeking Him, “ for'] as the lightning cometh out of the east and shineth even unto the west, so shall also the coming of the Son of Man be.” When He comes, therefore, it will be in no secret influence on the soul; no mere display of power in the infliction of judgments; no coming to be known only in a chamber or witnessed in a desert—but a bright and glorious manifestation of

a himself, instantaneous and Seen of all, -as the lightning which “ cometh out of the east and shineth even unto the west.” “ Behold he cometh with clouds," said the beloved disciple, long after the destruction of Jerusalem, yet repeating nearly the very words of the Saviour's prediction in the following verse, which is so often misapplied to the destruction of Jerusalem ; " Behold He cometh with clouds, and every eye shall see him, and they also which pierced him, and all kindreds of the earth shall wail because of him.” Rev. i. 7.

Having warned them against mistake or deception as to the nature of his coming, the Saviour proceeds

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more particularly to inform his disciples when this glorious event shall take place: "Immediately after the tribulation of those days, shall the sun be darkened, and the moon shall not give her light, and the stars shall fall from heaven, and the powers of the heavens shall be shaken; and then shall appear the sign of the Son of Man in heaven; and then shall all the tribes of the earth mourn, and they shall see the Son of Man comING IN THE CLOUDS OF HEAVEN, [or, as in the parallel gospel by Luke, (xxi. 27,) “ in a cloud,"] with power and great glory: and he shall send his angels with a great sound of a trumpet, and they shall gather together his elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other." In order, therefore, to know the period

” of our Saviour's return, it is only necessary to ascertain when “ the tribulation" here spoken of shall cease. For this we are furnished with three keys. The first may be found in the passage already quoted from the prophecies of Daniel. We there learn, that "unto the end of the war desolations are determined,” and that, “ for the overspreading of abominations,” the city and Sanctuary shall continue to be made desolate, “ even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate,”—or, (as corrected in the margin,) ** upon the desolator." It is to this continuance of the “ desolation, we apprehend, our attention is especially directed by the parenthetical warning of the Saviour or Evangelist, whoso readeth let him understand ;"—the full knowledge of its duration being necessary in order to the understanding of the prediction of his Return, “ immediately after the tribulation of those days," at its termination. The “consummation” has not yet arrived. God's controversy, or “ war," with his ancient people has not yet ceased; nor has “that determined" been wholly poured upon its objects, whether reading “desolate," it is referred to the Jews; or reading “ desolator," it is referred to those by whom they have been oppressed. But, as we have already seen, “ the end,” or “consummation,” will come when the gospel has been "preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations;" and when the city and Sanctuary cease to be made

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made " desolate.” God's controversy with his ancient people must cease before the Millennium, for then he shall have returned to them “with mercies ;" and, as we shall afterwards see, this is to be preceded by the infliction of dreadful judgments upon their enemies. The Saviour's return being immediately after the tribulation of those days" must therefore be before the Millennium.*

In the 21st verse, we have the second source of evidence, in the extent of the tribulation by which the coming of Christ shall be preceded: "For then shall be

* Mr. Faber treats as a “ vulgar error" the notion that Christ's coming in the clouds of heaven was at the destruction of Jerusalem; (Sacred Calender, vol. i. p. 207,) and correctly enough places it future at the “ close of the Times of the Gentiles, and at the end of the long dispersion of Judah among all nations.” But, contrary to all principles of homogeneity, so often and so ably advocated by himself, he maintains—and that on no higher authority than his own affirmation—that it will be a “figurative advent.” And having thus denie ed that our Lord here predicts His personal Return, he subsequently states that's the sole apparent evidence, which after long thought on the subject” he has been able to discover in favour of the views of Millenarians, is one single text. From this exception we are, however, allowed very little advantage. He might indeed as well have included it at once with the others, as it is only doomed to share a similar fate in a more advanced part of his argument. But is there a single circumstance in the above prediction of our Lord, or in the circunstances which gave rise to it, which would lead to the supposition of its being any thing else than a personal coming of which the Saviour speaks? The inconsistency of putting upon it a figurative interpretation is accurately stated in an observation, (perfectly applicable in the present case,) by the Rev. Dr. Wardlaw, in his last published volume of Sermons—to which alone, it may be observed, we subsequently refer, although for brevity's sake we shall in future merely cite the page from which we quote: “Did the words occur," says the Doctor, (p. 498,) speaking of a passage to which we shall yet have occasion to refer; - did the words occur in an historical or epistolary composition, it would justly be pronounced unnatural (unless we were specially warned of the writer's purposed deviation from his ordinary style,) to explain them symbolically.” And what else do those who, without any such “warning,” and in opposition to the “ordinary style” of both the Saviour and His evangelist, and at varience with the nature of the questions to which the prediction is professedly the answer, would put upon such language a figurative interpretation ? But we cannot here conceal our surprise that Dr. Wardlaw, in discussing the subject of Christ's premillennial coming, and professing to examine (p. 491) such passages as “may seem most directly relevant and important,” should not have at all adverted to this most direct and important prediction.

great tribulation, such as was not since the beginning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be; and except those days should be shortened, there should no flesh be saved ; but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.” Now as there cannot be two tribulations, each the greatest that ever was, this period cannot yet have arrived, for we learn from Daniel (xii. 1.) that this greatest tribulation is to be at the period of the restoration of Israel: “ And at that time,”—at the destruction of the Ottoman einpire, predicted in the last verse of the preceding chapter, -* And at that time shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people, and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation, even to that same time ; and at that time thy people shall be delivered, every one that shall be found written in the book.” Here then we find that the time of the greatest trouble, up to that period, is to be at the time of the restoration of Israel, the children of Daniel's people, when Michael the prince stands up in their behalf. This is again declared, (Jer. xxx. 7, 8:) " Alas! for that day is great, so that none is like it; it is even the time of Jacob's trouble, but he shall be saved out of it. For it shall come to pass in that day, saith the Lord of hosts, that I will break his yoke from off thy neck, and will burst thy bonds, and strangers shall no more serve themselves of him.” And as our Lord himself says, immediately after the tribulation of those days shall they see the Son of Man coming in the clouds of heaven, so the prophet here adds, “ They shall serve the Lord their God, and The BELOVED their 'King, whom I will raise up unto them.”—“Then shall be great tribulation such as was not since the beginning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be. And except those days should be shortened, there should no flesh be saved. But [blessed be God for His promise,] for the elect's sake, those days shall be shortened.” This prediction by our Lord, of a period when there should no flesh be saved but for the elect's sake, corresponds fully with another in Isaiah, which also refers to the period immediately preceding the time when the Lord of hosts shall

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reign in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem, and before his ancients gloriously.” Between the part of the prediction of our Lord concerning His Return, under consideration, and that of the prophet, there is an exact parallel, while the prophet also foretells the awful tribula

ion by which it is preceded : “Behold the Lord maketh the earth empty... Therefore the inhabitants of the earth are burned, and few men left.Is. xxiv. 1–6, 23. It seems therefore a misapplication of our Lord's prediction of this greatest tribulation to refer it to the destruction of Jerusalem, although it may have some appearance of being connected with the prophecy relative to that event. We apprehend, however, that our Lord, having foretold the near destruction of Jerusalem and the troubles connected with it, carries forward the views of believers to the day of the Lord, the longdesired Sabbath,—and to the more dreadful tribulation at its commencement, which he contrasts with that a! the destruction of Jerusalem. This, we think, is that

Sabbath," and that “ winter" or “ tempest," as the word signifies, (see Acts xxvii. 10,) concerning which the Saviour enjoins believing Jews to pray their flight be not in it. In this as in other cases the prophecy, having reference to the time of the Saviour's return, is addressed to the disciples for the instruction of their brethren in all ages. The flight to which he refers appears to be that already noticed, when “all nations" shall be gathered against Jerusalem to battle after the restoration of Israel, when, savs the prophet Zechariah, “ ye shall flee, like as ve fled from before the earthquake, in the days of Uzziah, king of Judah; and (as in our Lord's prophecy,] the Lord my God shall come, and all the saints with thee.” Zech. xiv. 1–5. This being

. . in a time of tribulation so much greater than was even that at the destruction of Jerusalem, the Saviour probably directs His disciples of the Jewish nation to whom the prophecy was given, and to whose circumstances much of it relates to pray that they be not involved in it.

There are various reasons which constrain us to think that it is at the 19th verse our Lord concludes his

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