Dryden

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Macmillan & Company, 1881 - 192 pages

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Page 87 - ALL human things are subject to decay, And, when Fate summons, monarchs must obey. This Flecknoe found, who, like Augustus, young Was called to empire, and had governed long. In prose and verse was owned, without dispute, Through all the realms of Nonsense absolute.
Page 57 - tis all a cheat; Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay: To-morrow's falser than the former day; Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
Page 132 - I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great when some great occasion is presented to him...
Page 82 - Thus heaping wealth, by the most ready way Among the Jews which was to cheat and pray : The city, to reward his pious hate Against his master, chose him magistrate. His hand a vare of justice did uphold, His neck was loaded with a chain of gold.
Page 6 - Oxford to him a dearer name shall be, Than his own mother university. Thebes did his green, unknowing youth engage; He chooses Athens in his riper age.
Page 95 - Thou tread'st, with seraphims, the vast abyss: Whatever happy region is thy place, Cease thy celestial song a little space ; Thou wilt have time enough for hymns divine, Since heaven's eternal year is thine.
Page 117 - Then no day void of bliss or pleasure leaving Ages shall slide away without perceiving: Cupid shall guard the door the more to please us. And keep out time and death when they would seize us; Time and death shall depart and say in flying Love has found out a way to live, by dying.
Page 87 - Through all the realms of Non-sense, absolute. This aged prince now flourishing in peace, And blest with issue of a large increase...
Page 142 - Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived today.
Page 143 - What is't to me, Who never sail in her unfaithful sea, If storms arise and clouds grow black; If the mast split and threaten wreck? Then let the greedy merchant fear For his ill-gotten gain, And pray to gods that will not hear, While the debating winds and billows bear His wealth into the main.

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