A Treatise on International Law: With an Introductory Essay on the Definition and Nature of the Laws of Human Conduct, 2. köide

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 114 - And the right honourable the lords commissioners of his majesty's Treasury, the lords commissioners of the Admiralty, and the lord warden of the Cinque Ports, are to give the necessary directions herein as to them may respectively appertain.
Page 131 - War is a contention between two or more states through their armed forces for the purpose of overpowering each other and imposing such conditions of peace as the victor pleases.
Page 211 - ... part of any province or people, or in the service of, or for, or under, or in aid of any person or persons exercising or assuming to exercise the powers of government in or over any foreign country, colony, province, or part of any province or people...
Page 233 - FOR THE ADAPTATION TO MARITIME WARFARE OF THE PRINCIPLES OF THE GENEVA CONVENTION.
Page 114 - Ireland, together with all persons and effects on lx>ard the said ships and vessels, but that the utmost care be taken for the preservation of all and every part of the cargoes on board any of the said ships and vessels, so that no damage or embezzlement whatever be sustained.
Page 167 - CONVENTION (XI) OF 1907 RELATIVE TO CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS WITH REGARD TO THE EXERCISE OF THE RIGHT OF CAPTURE IN NAVAL WAR.
Page 110 - ... the land at war with us. And if such are found in our land at the beginning of...
Page 98 - The English retaliated without applying to their Government, and things arose to that height of irregularity, that, with the same indifference on the part of their kings, the one nation made alliance with the Irish and Dutch ; the other with the Flemings and Genoese. Two hundred Norman vessels scoured the English seas, and hanged all the seamen they could find. Their enemies in return fitted out a strong fleet, destroyed or took the greater part of the Normans, and giving no quarter, massacred them,...
Page 374 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 249 - A person can only be considered a spy when, acting clandestinely or on false pretences, he obtains or endeavors to obtain information in the zone of operations of a belligerent, with the intention of communicating it to the hostile party.

Bibliographic information