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DESCRIPTION OF OBJECTS.
The Elephant
The Camel
The Loadstone.
The Coffee Tree
The Tea Plant

42 ib 43 44 ib

EXTEMPORE SPEAKING.
Remarks on Extempore Speaking
Remarks on Figures of Speech
The Passions

45 50 58

LESSONS IN PROSE.
Neglect of the Bible
Majesty of the Scriptures

64 65

ORATIONS.
Hon. T. Erskine, on the Bible.
Defence of C. Phillips, Esq.
Adams, on American Independence
Chatham, on the American War..
Brougham, on Slavery
Erskine, on Abuse of Public Patronage
Grattan, on the National Grievances.
Rolla

67 71 76 77 80 81 84 85

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HIGH AND CHEERFUL. How Cheerful along the gay mead

91

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SIMPLE VERSE.
Search for Happiness.
Sea-side Thoughts
Thou art O God
The Dying Boy
The Polish Children
The Idiot Boy
The Fragrant Shrine
Is it not sweet
The Babe
The Orphan Boy.
Casa Bianca
The Daisy
A Mother
Home..
Too Late
Arab and Steed
Neptune

93
94
ib
95
96
97
99
100

ib
101
102
103
104

ib
105
106
107

DIDACTIC.
Speak Gently
The Worm
Prayer
The Negro's Complaint.
" Wine is a Mocker”.
“Strong Drink is raging”
Water
It is Finished

108

ib
109

ib
111
112
113
114

DESCRIPTIVE.
Fitz-James and Roderick Dha
The Battle of Flodden Field
The Battle of Hohenlinden
The Destruction of Sennacherib's Army
The Night before the Battle of Waterloo

115
118
120
121
122

GRAMMAR CHANT.

Orthography.

Or-tho-graphy cor-rectly guides my mind to proper 2:2

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But if the sound you do not rightly know,
Stop at the Vowel, ,-ere you farther go
When follow'd by a Consonant alone:
Take an example, thus, Phe-no-me-non.

3
But if two Consonants together be,
And this in compound words we often see,
Stop at the first; as thus, I ap-prehend:
Howe'er you've err'd, you cannot fail to mend.

Etymology.

4
Now, ETYMOLOGY doth clearly show
The Etymon, whence words derived do flow;
The roots most fruitful, from which words abound,
Are variations of the Verb and Noun,

Nine sorts of words, I purpose here to teach,
Because in them we comprehend our speech:
These understood, and rightly used, we're taught
The mutual bliss of interchange of thought.
ARTICLES. (Articulus, a small joint, or part.)

6
The ARTICLES are these,-1,-Ang—and The,-
Before all Nouns to fix their sense must be:
The Definite* is The, and well defines
The Man, The Horse, The Fields, The Fruits, The Kinds.

• De, means out-Finis, the end.

7 But A, or An, Indefinite* appear: We say A Man, À Horse, An Hour, An Ear, And if through all examples I had run, 'Tis undefined, for A means any one.

* In, means not-De Finis.

8 From these examples of an Hour, an Ear, An with mute h-or Vowels must appear; But when no articles with nouns we find, All are compris’d, for man means all mankind. NOUN* OR SUBSTANTIVE. (* Nomen, a name.)

9 A Noun, means name, of things, as house, man, ball, We Common some, and others Proper call : The GENDER, for distinction mark with care, Are Male, or Female, though some Neuter are.

10 Some Proper names, as Angel, Sun, or Time, By common figure we like males decline; But Moon, Church, Ships, and Virtues, as they were Of Women's race, the female gender bear

11 One, is the number Singular,* for Nouns; The Plural t number, all beyond abounds: The Case of Nouns, implies the way they fall, Some teach but one, but I find three in all. * Singu.us, one by one.

+ Pius, more.

| Casum, to formen

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