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CORRESPONDENCE. *This department being open to free discussion on all Professional topics, the Editor

does not hold himself responsible for any opinions or statements contained in it.

NOTES AND QUERIES. Nono are inserted unless the name and address of the writer are sent, not necessarily

for publication, but as a guarantee of bona fides.

Queries. 19. FISHERY.-Has it been expressly decided by an English court whether or no the public have a right to fish in & navigable river above the ebb and flow of the tide ? I understand there are recent decisions negativing the right. References will'oblige.

OXONIAN.

RETIREMENT OF JUDGES.—The salary of a retiring judge is a mere fleabite as regards our public revenue ; and I think that in the great majority of instances a new judge would do better work than one of more than fifteen years' service. The frequont infusion of new blood on the Bench, especially of men in the prime of life, would tend to keep the adminis. tration of the laws more abreast of the age, and to the more speedy correction of any defect which experience had brought to light. Nor can I regard the retirement of a competent judge on a suitable pension as by any means an unmixed evil.

We want more men of leisure and ability fully acquainted with the existing law and practice, its merits and its defects. A few retired judges in the House of Commons would, I think, be much more useful as regards the amendment of the laws or new legal enactments than the same number of practising barristers. And even out of the House they could put their legal knowledge to such excellent uses as Mr. Montagu Crackanthorpe and Sir H. B. Poland are doing. If a judge is not retired until he is past his labour he is useless for these purposes, while his position on the Bench before retirement keeps him silent on many points on which the public might derive much profit from his views.

B. L.

20. COMPANY_TRANSFER OF SHARES-BANKRUPTCY.-A. the registered proprietor of shares in a limited company transfers same to B. and bands certificates to him. B. neglects to register transfers for six months. In the meantime A. becomes bankrupt. Is the company justified in registering transfer after notice of bankruptcy ?

J. G. W.

LAW STUDENTS' JOURNAL.

66

SOLICITORS' MANAGING CLERKS' ASSOCIATION.-I observe that one of the Occasional Notes” in your issue of the 2nd inst. refers to the fact of this association having received a donation of £100, and it is asked, “What will they do with the money ?” and it is also suggested that possibly it was intended for the United Law Clerks' Society. May I be allowed to tell the author of the note, through you, that the association will have no difficulty in applying the money in furthering its objects, though it is not a charitable association, and that, as I personally know the donor and as the amount was paid to me as treasurer, I am in a position to inform your querist that the donation was not intended for the United Law Clerks' Society, but beyond question for this association. The donation was absolutely unsolicited, and was promised subject to the performance of certain conditions. I may perhaps add that the objects of this association do not in any way conflict with those of the United Law Clerks' Society, but on the contrary they, the two bodies, can safely and properly exist side by side, each having for its objects the benefit of solicitors' clerks, though the one proceeds on lines entirely different to those governing the other.

Josh. WRIGHT, Treasurer.

ADMINISTERING THE OATH.-Since the condemnation by medical men and others for sanitary reasons (which appear to be well grounded) of the old form of administering oaths on the Testament, a real practical difficulty has arisen which ought to be removed. There is a reluctance to resort to the Scotch oath, which may be said to be a clumsy method and unsuited to an English police-court. The procedure should be simple and binding, rendering

a witness liable for perjury. There seems to be an impression that the Legislature will have to be resorted to. This should, if possible, be avoided, seeing that Parliament would, in accordance with its modern practice, be sure to make things worse. All that is required is a short form dispensing with the Testament which might be generally adopted. It is much more convenient to administer an oath than that each individual should, as it were, be taught the oath he is about to take, and be asked to repeat it. Looking at 1 & 2 Vict. c. 105, at Mildrane's case and the other cases quoted in Oke, 13th edit., vol. i., p. 86, and bear. ing in mind the fundamental principle that all that is wanted is that an oath shall be administered in such a form as is binding on the witness's conscience and render him liable for perjury, I submit that the following is a good oath, and may be properly administered without a Testament : “You swear that the evidence you shall give shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God, in token whereof and that you declare this oath to be binding hold up your hand.” I shall be much obliged if you will kindly give me your own views as to this, and to hear also what any of your correspondents may have to say about it, because, if the above form be good, there is an end of the difficulty.

A JUSTICES' CLERK,

THE LONDON LL.B. THE "pass” examination for this degree, which falls midway between the December Bar examination and the Solicitors' Final, always affords a fair opportunity for testing the respective merits of various systems of legal education. Since the University as at present constituted remains an examining body merely, students who have relied on their private reading, or the services of an outside “coach,” can compete on equal terms with those who have sat at the feet of the lecturers at the Council of Legal Education, or the Incorporated Law Society, without fear of falling foul of the favourite “tit-bits" of some tutor who is probably also examining, or of being examined merely on some limited field of knowledge. For the purpose of replacing the present effete machinery of the Council of Legal Education, or the abortive attempt of the Incorporated Law Society to teach subjects (which to some extent ought to be learnt in the office), by something better, a great central law university might constitute a boon, but it will have its disadvantages in depriving the country of a common battle-field for testing the capacity of stadents variously trained. At present we have a body of impartial men who have made their mark in the Profession, but who do not teach, examining anybody who chooses to pay a small fee and pass a previous examination in the ordinary subjects of a liberal education. Any change, although it may have some advantages, will entail a loss, for we all know what a teaching body conducting its own examinations means in the long run.

At the recent examination the University fully maintained its reputation. Candidates as usual were distinctly reminded to give reasons for their answers to the problems propounded, which often consisted of the facts of a decided though not necessarily a recent case, or of facts somewhat similar, from which an analogy or distinction might be drawn. The first Common Law paper opened with four searching questions on contract law, and dealt with agency, the duty of inquiry on discounting a bill, interest on debts and sale of goods. Then followed some easier questions on the special subjects of the year, viz., false imprisonment and malicious prosecution. The remaining questions were on crimes and the law of evidence ; the latter subject has always been a leading feature at the University, while at one time it was almost entirely neglected at the Bar examinations, although of late years there has been a little awakening. The afternoon paper went very much over the same ground, but the questions appear easier; and the facts of two comparatively recent cases, viz., Barker v. Furlong and Ultzen v. Nichols, turn up. There must have been some little slip in the arrangements, for, at the examination in common law, although candidates are reminded to give reasons, nothing is mentioned about commencing answers on a separate leaf, and against writing at the back of a leaf, while on the second day these admonitions duly appear.

The Real and Personal Property paper was largely devoted to the special subjects of the syllabus, viz., powers, commons, and easements. As regards general points, the Contingent Remainders Act (40 & 41 Vict. c. 33) was required. Question 7 seems very wide, “Sketch shortly the history of English law with regard to the inclosure of commons." Under the heading of powers the examiner managed to drag in a practical point on estate duty, and the paper escaped the slur of becoming too academic. The Equity paper was a good all-round test. Many candidates might have given a good deal of time to the special subject of resulting trusts, and yet overlooked the important House of Lords decision in Cooke v. Smith, but the student with any fairly wide range of reading would be fairly familiar with it. The LL.B. degree should not be attempted by a man who intends to be a schoolmaster, and who merely wishes to get a degree and to shirk the ordeal of the B.A., but by those who intend or hope to make law their profession. The syllabus of equity subjects included the phrase "securities," but the event proved that it meant, what every sensible person expected it meant, mortgages pure and simple, and not such common law matters as "securities for the peace and good behaviour," &c. As regards Roman Law the questions from the Digest were fairly easy. This generally happens when there is no published translation of the portion of Digest selected, and we are not aware of any translation of De Interdictis. The questions on the History of Roman Law were not out of the way, perhaps a little too much on subjects on which a student would be inclined to be sketchy, and they may result in “ploughing” a good many.

CONVEYANCING IN CORNWALL.—I can corroborate to the letter the facts stated by“ Lex" in your last issue. Last September I was instructed by a purchaser to act for him on the purchase of property situate in Newquay, Cornwall. He informed me he had signed a contract. On perusing same, I was astonished to find that the vendor's solicitor, who practises at Newquay, had inserted a clause to the effect that he should act for both parties, and also specifying his remuneration. The purchaser assured me the clause was inserted without consulting him in the matter. The consequence was, I only got remunerated for preparing the mortgage deed. Surely this is a matter where the Incorporated Law Society might, with advantage, institute inquiry in the interests of its country members as to the prevailing practice in the county of Cornwall, and use its influence to bring about a more equitable state of things.

EDGAR THOS. KING.

ASPINALL'S MARITIME LAW REPORTS (New series). -Containing all the Decisions in the Admiralty Courts of England and Ireland, and in all the Superior Courts, with Notes by the Editor. Quarterly, price 5s. 6d., and will be sent free by post to subscribers. Aspinall's Vols. 1 to 5, N. S., containing Cases from 1871 to 1887, have been reprinted. Price, for complete set in half calf, £10.-HORACE Cox, “ Law Times” Office, Windsor House, Bream's-buildings, E.C.-[Apvr.]

COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION. The Council of Legal Education have made the following awards on the Hilary Honour Examination of students of the Inns of Court, held at the Middle Temple on the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th Dec. 1896 :

Cyril Atkinson, Lincoln's-inn, a studentship of 100 guineas a year, tenable for three years.

Cornelius Lyhane, Middle Temple, a special prize of £50 for the best examination in Constitutional Law (English and Colonial) and Legal History.

John Arthur Slater, Middle Temple, and Harry Procter, Lincoln's-inn, certificates of honour.

Walter George Salis Schwabe, Inner Temple, pass certificate.

NOTE.--Messrs. Lyhane, Meggs, and Reed also qualified for pass certificates, but have been certified at previous examinations.

MIDDLE TEMPLE.-Rustomjee Nourojee Burjojee, James Dewsbury Chorlton, Victor Xavier de Verteuil, Arthur Henry Robinson, and Edward Theodore Chalmers Werner.

GRAY'S-INN.-Dhayabhai Pitamberdas Derasari, and Sydney Charles Nichols Goodman.

Of twenty-seven examined, twenty-two passed. Of the five candidates who failed, one was ordered not to be admitted for examination again until the Trinity Examination 1897.

The following passed in Roman Law :-

LINCOLN'S-INN.-Mohammad Azim, Gopal Mukund Bootee, James Frederick Clyne, Valentine Francis Taubman Goldie, William Kent Lemon, Charles Knowles Rayson, Hugh Munro Ross, Edmund Heathcote Thruston, Arthur Harold Webster, and William George Willoughby.

INNER TEMPLE. · William Grylls Adams, William Henry Allen, William Augeraud, Samuel Barker Bennett, John Arthur Bleackley, William Player Brigstocke, Raymond Henry Yates Bullock, Angus Campbell, Nigel George Davidson, David George Evans, John Devonald Fletcber, Arthur Grieve Jamieson, George Cruddas Jobling, John James Oswald Murphy, Harold Thomas Perkins, Frank Duerdin Perrott, Nigel Ross Playfair, Leonard Pomeroy, James Reginald Lea Rankin, George Radcliffe Shaw, Madhavrao Abaji Sitole, Oriel John Clotworthy Whyte Melville Skeffington, Thorold Arthur Stewart-Jones, Fritz van Warmelo, and William Joseph von Winckler.

MIDDLE TEMPLE. --- Alfred Percy Carryer, Herbert Evelyn Crook, Reginald Bruce Fellows, Campbell Kirkman Finlay, Fitz Roy Hemphill, Syed Hosain, Hendrik Jacobus Hugo, John Hall Seymour Lloyd, David Mackinlay Menzies, Frank Lorymer Riseley, William James Parkinson Smith, Arthur Hepburn Walsh, Hamilton Willis, John Bertram Wood, and William M.Knight Young.

GRAY'S-INN.-Cornelis Adrian Bergsma, Forrest Falton, Syed Alay Hasan, Ernest Houghton, Sydney William Jones, Isardag Oodbaram, Ramchandra Vasudso Paranjpé, Charles Porter, Sardar Mahatal Singh, Frederick Alan Vander-Meulen, and George Albert Woodcock.

Of sixty-eight examined sixty-one passed.

Pass CERTIFICATES. The following awards are made on the result of the pass examination, held in the Middle Temple Hall on the 15th, 16th, and 17th Dec. 1896:

LINCOLN'S-INN.-William Valentine Ball, Alnod John Boger, Charles Arthur Bury, Kumud Nath Chaudhuri, Percyvall Hart Dyke, Augustin Stanislaus Ghosh, William Montague Harrison, Huntly Eugene Jenkins, Hasan Sherfudin Khalil, Nagendra Chandra Mitra, Kunwar Udaya Vir Singha Raghubansi, Miguel Francisco Ribeiro, Brian Walker, and Wee Theam Tew.

INNER TEMPLE.—Percy Maurice M Lardie Sheldon Amos, Algernon Edward Aspinall, Basil Ion Gawaine Temple Blackwood, John Pins Boland, Henry Alwyn Bros, Walter John Burt, Armar Loury-Corry Corry, Lionel Frank Christopher Darby, Walter Tice Gellibrand, Herman Barker Hahlo, Copley Delisle Hewitt, Ernest Augustus Hitchens, Bertram Hopkinson, James Leonard Johnston, Robert Bird Robertson Mair, George Morley, Thomas Woollcombe Barton O'Neal, Ralph Leigh Ramsbotham, Michael Edwin Reed, John Edward Bernard Seely, James Bellord Waldron, Pelham Francis Warner, and Ernest Wingate WingateSaul.

MIDDLE TEMPLE.--George Addison-Smith, William Joseph Fearfield Barton, Harold Eustace Brandon, Alexander Thomas Dawson, Francis Yvon Eccles, Thomas Charles Fenton, Albert Farrar Gatliff (awarded the “J. J. Powell” prize), Noel Ledbrook Griffith, William Pollock Ker, William Joseph Harding King, Christopher Sothern Lewis, Edwin May. field, Narindra Lal Mitter, Sisir Kumar Mullick, Savile Charles Petch, Maurice Salvador Pinto, and William Saunderson.

GRAY'S-INN.--Hans Raj Bhandari, Harold Brodrick Gilbert Brodrick, Frederick Hugh Mackenzie Corbet, George Gregory Fisher, John Macdonald Henderson, George Darrell Keogh, and Isaac Petrus Van Heerden.

The number examined was ninety-six, of whom sixty-one passed. Of the thirty-five candidates who failed six were ordered not to be admitted for examination again until the Trinity Examination 1897, and one until the Michaelmas Examination 1897.

The fo lowing passei in Constitutional Law and Legal History only :

LINCOLN'S-INN.---Mirza Nawroz Ali, Syed Zeauddin Ahmed Balkhi, Arthur Philip Braybrooke, Devi Dayal, Walter Devonshire Ellis, Walter Graham Everitt, Frederick Richard Finch, Jotirao Bhasker Khasgiwale, Behari Lal Merh, Bhailabbai Bhaibabhai Patel, Jeshingbhai Bhaibabhai Patel, Paul Peter Pillai, and Mohanlal Jivanlal Vakil.

INNER TEMPLE.--Reginald John Edward Baker, William Theodore Barneby, Robert Harrison Barron, John Miles Dawson, Stuart Downs, William Melville Foster, Claud George Gordon, Rupert Sackville Gwynne, Acheson FitzGerald Henderson, Henry Albert Hinkson, John Felix Kershaw, Edgar Arthur Kirby, Stephen Hamilton Langton, Ewen Reg ald Logan, Kenneth M.Lean Marshall, Robert Anstruther Bullock Marsham, Cyril Edgar Martineau, Robert Gordon Melville Mitchell, Ausgustus Ferryman Mochler-Ferryman, Denis Newman, Edward Camilo Oppenheim, Wilfrid George Hilton Price, Robert Amyatt Ray, Ernald Edward Richardson, Robert Bannerman Fraser Robertson, Frederick Holland Schwann, Richard Trevilbrick Gilbertstone Tangye, Ernest Edward Turner, and Bernard Kevington Rodwell Wilkinson.

MIDDLE TEMPLE.-Gerald Archibald Arbuthnot, John Bridge Aspinall, Douglass Horace Boggis-Rolfe, Alexander Cairns, Richard George Temple Coventry, Thomas Bartholomew Curran, Henri Omer Decugis, Charles Henry Joseph De Gannes, Trimbakrai Jadavrai Desai, Ignatius Stephanus Ferreira, William Spencer Clayton Greene, Carlton Hackney, Henry Francis Herford, Edmund King Houchin, Ralph Nevill, Baliol Edward Scott, Deep Narayan Singh, Ernest Hugh Snell, and Samuel Joyce Thomas.

GRAY'S-INN.-Laurence Joseph Byrne, John Stanley, Griffith-Jones, and Dhanpat Rai.

Of eighty-one examined, sixty-four passed.

The following passed in Roman Law and Constitutional Law and Legal History :--

LINCOLN'S-INN.-Narayan Kesheo Aloni, Khrisnaji Waman Bhat, and Edward David Chetham Strode.

INNER TEMPLE.--Robert William Allen, George Francis Stephen Christie, John Wallis Davies, John Dove, Warwick Herbert Draper, Anthony Morton Henley, Cecil Arthur Hunt, Herbert Jenner-Fust, Arthur Maxwell Labouchere, Foster Macmahon Mahon, Victor Alexander Frederick Villiers Russell, and John Guy Rutledge.

STUDENTS' SOCIETIES. LAW STUDENTS' DEBATING SOCIETY.—The usual weekly meeting of the above society was held at the Law Institution, Chancery-lane, on Tuesday, the 12th inst. ; chairman, Mr. Herbert Smith. The subject for debate was : DXXVII.. “ That the case of Fricker v. Van Grutten (75 L. T. Rep. 117; (1896) 2 Ch. 649) was wrongly decided.” Mr. A. W. Watson opened in the affirmative, and Mr. E. L. Chapman seconded ; Mr. G. Prosser opened in the negative, and Mr. W. Hudson seconded. The following members also spoke : Messrs. Archer, White, Gibson, Hair, Woodhouse. Mr. Watson having replied, the Chairman summed up, and on being put to the meeting the motion was carried by one vote.-The subject for debate at the next meeting of the society on Tuesday, the 19th Jan. 1897, is “That International Bimetallism is practicable and desirable," on which subject Mr. Henry McNeil, the secretary of the Bimetallic League, will open the debate in the affirmative, and the Hon. George Peel, the secretary of the Gold Standard Defence Association, in the negative.

HASTINGS AND ST. LEONARDS.-The second annual dinner of this society was held at the Palace Hotel, Hastings, on Thursday the 7th inst. Mr. Ben F. Meadows (town clerk) was in the chair, and the company to the number of about twenty, included as guests Mr. F. A. Inderwick, Q.C., and C. F. Baker (chief constable). Several gentlemen who had taken tickets found themselves unable to attend, and sent letters explaining absence. The President of the society (Lord Russell of Killowen) wrote expressing his regret at being unable to be present on this occasion, but that he hoped to attend the next dinner. The following also sent letters of apology : Mr. Justice Grantham (vice president), the Recorder, Mr. Albert Gibson (editor of Law Notes), Mr. D. W. Grantham, Mr. A. D. Thorpe, Mr. E. Chalinder (hon. treasurer), Mr. C. Sheppard, and Mr. J. R. Cochran. Music was alternated with the speaking, and songs were contributed by Messrs. F. G. Langham, E. H. Langham, H. G. Phillips, A. M. Elliott, and H. Poole (pianist). A very enjoyable evening was spent, the company separating at midnight. Mr. Inderwick has intimated his intention of becoming a member of the society.-On the 21st inst., Mr. A. H. Trevor, M.A., barrister-at-law, will deliver a lecture on the “ Law of Negotiability and Negotiable Instruments."

HULL.–The annual dinner of the Hull Law Students' Society was held on the 7th inst., at the Station hotel, the president (Mr. A. M. Jackson) in the chair. Amongst those present were Mr. H. S. Lambert, Mr. T. Hart, Mr. Sidney Clarke, Dr. T. C. Jackson, Mr. R. W. Aske,, Mr. T. R. Ferens, Mr. Alan Park, Mr. H. Hall, Mr, H. T. Kemp, Mr. J. H. Hill, Mr. T. L. Locking, Mr. Moss-Blundell, and Mr. J. T. Ferens (hon. sec.). The hon. secretary acknowledged apologies for absence from Mr. John Forbes, Q.C. (the Recorder), his Honour Judge Bedwell, his Worship the Mayor of Hull, his Worship the Sheriff of Hull, Mr. H. H. Grotrian, and Mr. E. C. Twiss.- The Chairman having submitted “The Queen,” Dr. T. C. Jackson proposed “The Bench and the Bar.” It was the greatest compliment that one could pay to the Bench and the Bar, he said, that there was so little to say about them. The English judiciary was at present in an extremely high state of efficiency. The only room for grievance was that some of the older and more learned judges would not retire to make room for the younger men, and give a leg-up right down to almost all the fresher members of the Profession. It was always said that a judge had to pass through three stages. The first was when he had just been appointed, and was so nervous that he thought everything he did was

wrong ; the second was when he was beginning to feel his feet, and was practically assured that all he did was right; the third was when he didn't care a hang whether he was right or wrong. He had much pleasure in coupling with the toast the names of Mr. H. B. Grotrian and Mr. H. T. Kemp, whom he was sure they would hope to see occupy the last stage at which the judges arrived.-Mr. H. B. Grotrian, acknowledged the first part of the compliment. Mr. H. T. Kemp thought that any man who had the privilege of practising in Hull was a lucky man--because, whether they appeared before the magnificent specimen of humanity his Honour Judge Bedwell, or that most learned and canny Scot who sat in the Sessions Court, or their most painstaking and courteous stipendiary, they always received the greatest possible amount of kindness, courtesy, and consideration.-Mr. R. W. Aske gave the toast of “The Profession.” He said that the topical historical lawyer had practically died out at the present time, and the Profession comprised none but men who were men of truth, and could be deemed worthy of the attributes and prestiges of the Profession. He ventured to say that the Legal Profession exercised the utmost influence upon all phases and classes of life, and that that influence had the most beneficial resalts in all directions.-Mr. H. Lambert, in a few brief and well-chosen words, responded.—The toast of " Mr. J. T. Hill, the vice president, and the only surviving solicitor of the pre-Victorian era in Hall, was next proposed by the Chairman and musically honoured.-“ The Hull Law Society," “ The Hull Law Students' Society,” and “The President” followed. The following gentlemen-Messrs. E. Manston, Wilson, W. W. Hall, H. B. Jackson, T. Hart, R. Slack, and H. Thompson, --contributed to the harmony of the meeting.

APPEAL COURT II. Final and Interlocutory Appeals from the Chancery, and Probate, Divorce,

and Admiralty Divisions (Probate and Divorce), and the County Palatine

and Stannaries Courts. Monday, Jan. 11 - Appeal motions ex, Wednesday, March 3-Appeal motions et

parte, original motions, appeals from parte, original motions, appeals from orders made on interlocutory motions orders made on interlocutory motions (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals required

if required Tuesday, Jan. 12, to Tuesday, Jan. 19— Thursday, March 4 - County Palatine Chancery final appeals

appeals and Chancery final appeals Wednesday, Jan. 20-Appeal motions ex Friday, March 5, to Tuesday, March 9

parte, original motions, appeals from or- Chaucery final appeals ders made on interlocutory motions (sep. Wednesday, March 10-Appeal motions er list), and Chancery final appeals if pnrte, original motions, appeals from required

orders made on interlocutory motions Thursday, Jan. 21, to Tuesday, Jan. 26– (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals Chancery final appeals

if required Wednesday, Jan. 27–Appeal motions ex Thursday, March 11, to Tuesday, March 16

parte, original motions, appeals from or- --Chancery final appeals ders made on interlocutory motions (sep. Wednesday, March 17-Appeal motions er list), and Chancery final appeals if parte, original motions, appeals from required

orders made on interlocutory motions Thursday, Jan, 28, to Tuesday, Feb. 2- (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals Chancery final appeals.

if required Wednesday, Feb. 3 — Appeal motions er Thursday, March 18, to Tuesday, March 23 porte, original motions, appeals from -Chancery final appeals orders made on interlocutory motions Wednesday, March 24-Appeal motions er (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals parte, original motions, appeals from if iequired

orders made on interlocutory motions Thursday, Feb. 4 - County Palatine (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if

appeals and Chancery final appeals required. Friday, Feb. 5, to 'Tuesday, Feb. 9- Thursday, March 25, to Tuesday, March 30 Chancery final appeals

-Chancery Final Appeals Wednesday, Feb. 10-Appeal motions or Wednesday, March 31-Appeal motions ex parte, original motions, appeals from part, original motions, appeals from orders made on interlocutory motions orders made on interlocutory motions (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if required

required Thursday. Feb. 11, to Tuesday, Feb. 16– Thursday, April 1- County Palatine Chancery final appeals

appeals and Chancery final appeals Wednesday, Feb. 17-Appeal motions ex Friday, April 2, to Tuesday, April 6

parte, original motions, appeals from Chancery final appeals orders made on interlocutory motions Wednesday, April 7.--Appeal motions ex (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if parte, original motions, appeals from required

orders made on interlocutory motions Thursday, Feb. 18, to Tuesday, Feb. 23— (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if Chancery final appeals

required Wednesday, Feb. 24-Appeal motions er Thursday, April 8. to Tuesday, April 13– parte, original motions, appeals from Chancery tinal appeals orders made on interlocutory motions Wednesday, April 14-Appeal motions er (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals if parte, original motions, appeals from required

orders made on interlocutory motions Thursday, Feb. 25, to Tuesday, March 2– (sep. list), and Chancery final appeals Chancery final appeals

if required. N.B.-Lunacy matters (if any) are taken in Appeal Court II., on every Monday at eleven until further notice.

THE COURTS AND COURT PAPERS.

SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE.—HILARY

SITTINGS, 1897.
Court of Appeal.

APPEAL COURT I.
Final and Interlocutory Appeals from the Queen's Bench Division, the

Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty Division (Admiralty), and the Queen's

Bench Division sitting in Bankruptcy. Monday, Jan. 11 — Appeal motions ex | Monday, March 1- Appeal motions

parte, original motions, appeals from er parte, original motions, appeals orders made on interlocutory motions, from orders made on interlocutory and new trial paper if required

motions, and Q.B. final appeals if reTuesday, Jan. 12, to Thursday, Jan. 14— quired New trial paper

Tuesday, March 2, to Thursday, March 4Friday, Jan. 15-Bankruptcy appeals and Queen's Bench final appeals new trial paper

Friday, March 5–-Bankruptcy appeals and Saturday, Jan. 16-New trial paper

Q.B. final appeals Monday, Jan. 18-Appeal motions ex Saturday, March 6-Queen's Bench final parte, original motions, appeals from appeals orders made on interlocutory motions, Monday, March

8

Appeal motions and Q.B. final appeals if required

er parte, original motions, appeals Tuesday, Jan. 19, to Thursday, Jan, 21- from orders made on interlocutory Queen's Bench final appeals

motions, and new trial paper if reFriday, Jan, 22-Bankruptcy appeals and quired. Q.B. Anal appeals

Tuesday, March 9, to Thursday, March 11 Saturday, Jan. 23-Queen's Bench final -New trial paper appeals

Friday, March 12 - Bankruptcy appeals Monday, Jan. 25-Appeal motions ex parte, and new trial paper

original motions, appeals from orders Saturday, March 13--New trial paper made on interlocutory motions, and now Monday, March 15 - Appeal motions trial paper if required

ex parte, original motions, appeals Tuesday, Jan. 26, to Thursday, Jan. 28- from orders made on interlocutory New trial paper

motions, and Q.B. final appeals if reFriday, Jan. 29-Bankruptcy appeals and quired new trial paper

Tuesday, March 16, to Thursday, March 18 Saturday, Jan. 30-New trial paper

-Queen's Bench final appeals Monday, Feb. 1--Appeal motions er Friday, March 19 - Bankruptcy appeals

parte, original motions, appeals from and Q.B. final appeals orders made on interlocutory motions, Saturday, March 20-Queen's Bench final and Q.B. final appeals if required

appeals Tuesday, Feb. 2, to Thursday, Feb. 4- Monday, March 22 – Appeal motions ex Queen's Bench final appeals

parte, original motions, appeals from Friday, Feb. 5--Bankruptcy appeals and orders made on interlocutory motions, Q.B. final appeals

and new trial paper if required. Saturday, Feb. 6-Queen's Bench flnal Tuesday, March 23, to Thursday, March 25 appeals

-New trial paper Monday, Feb. 8- Appeal motions ex Friday, March 26 - Bankruptcy appeals

parte, original motions, appeals from and new trial paper orders made on interlocutory motions, Saturday, March 27-New trial paper and new trial paper if required

Monday, March 29-Appeal motions er Tuesday, Feb. 9, to Thursday, Feb. 11- parte, original motions, appeals from New trial pa per

orders made on interlocutory motions, Friday, Feb. 12-Bankruptcy appeals and and Q.B. final appeals if required new trial paper

Tuesday, March 30, to Thursday, April 1 Saturday, Feb. 13-New trial paper

-Queen's Bench final appeals Monday, Feb. 15-Appeal motions er Friday, April 2—Bankruptcy appeals and

parte, original motions, appeals from Q.B. final appeals orders made on interlocutory motions, Saturday, April 3-Queen's Bench final and Q.B. final appeals if required

appeals Tuesday, Feb. 16, to Thursday, Feb. 18 Monday, April 5 — Appeal motions e.r Queen's Bench foal appeals

parte, original motions, appeals from Friday, Feb. 19-Bankruptcy appeals and orders made on interlocutory motions, Q.B. final appeals

and new trial paper if required Saturday, Feb. 20—Queen's Bench final Tuesday, April 6, to Thursday, April 8– appeals

New trial paper
Monday, Feb. 22-Appeal motions ex Friday, April 9-Bankruptcy appeals and

parte, original motions, appeals from new trial paper
orders made on interlocutory motions, Saturday, April 10–New trial paper
and new trial paper if required

Monday, April 12 - Appeal motions er Tuesday, Feb. 23, to Thursday, Feb. 25– parte, original motions, appeals from New trial paper

orders made on interlocutory motions, Friday, Feb. 26-Bankruptcy appeals and and Q.B. final appeals if required new trial paper

Tuesday, April 13. and Wednesday, Saturday, Feb. 27-New trial paper April 14-Queen's Bench final appeals

N.B.-Admiralty appeals (with assessors) will be taken on days to be appointed by the Court.

sum

High Court of Justice.

Chancery Division.
CHANCERY COURT I.—Before Mr. Justice CHITTY.
Monday, Jan, 11-Sitting in Chambers Monday, March 1-Sitting in Chambers
Tuesday, Jan. 12-Motions

Tuesday, March 2, to Thursday, March 4
Wednesday, Jan. 13, and Thursday, Jan. 14 -Non-witness list
Non-witness list

Friday, March 3 - Motions and nonFriday, Jan. 15-Motions and non-witness witness list list

Saturday, March 6- Petitions, short Saturday, Jan.

16 - Petitions, short causes, procedure. summonses, opposed causes, procedure summonses, opposed petitions, and non-witness list petitions, and non-witness list

Monday, March 8-Sitting in Chambers. Monday, Jan. 18-Sitting in Chambers Tuesday, March 9, to Thursday, March 11 Tuesday, Jan. 19, and Wednesday, Jan. 20 -Non-witness list --Non-witness list

Friday, March 12 - Motions and nonThursday, Jan. 21 - Motions for Mr. witness list

Justice North, and non-witness list Saturday, March 13--Petitions, short Friday, Jan. 22--Motions and non-witness causes, opposed petitions, procedure list

summonses, and non-witness list Saturday, Jan. 23–Petitions, short causes, Monday, March 15--Sitting in Chamopposed petitions, procedure

bers monses, and non-witness list, including Tuesday, March 16, to Thursday, March 18 unopposed petitions for Mr. Justice --Non-witness list North

Friday, March 19—Motions and nonMonday, Jan. 25—Sitting in Chambers witness list Tuesday, Jan. 26, and Wednesday, Jan, 27 Saturday, March 20–Petitions,

short -Non-witness list

causes, procedure summonses, opposed Thursday, Jan. 28 - Motions for Mr. petitions, and non-witness list

Justice North, and non-witness list Monday, March 22-Sitting in Chambers Friday, Jan. 29-Motions and non-witness Tuesday, March 23, to Thursday, March 25 list

--Non-witness list Saturday, Jan. 30—Petitions, short causes, Friday, March 26-Motions and non

procedure summopses, opposed peti- witness list tions, and non-witness list, including Saturday, March 27--Petitions, short unopposed petitions for Mr. Justice

causes, opposed petitions, procedure North

summonses, and non-witness list Monday, Feb. 1-Sitting in Chambers Monday, March 29-Sitting in ChamTuesday, Feb. 2, to Saturday, Feb. 6– bers Witness list

Tuesday, March 30, to Thursday, April 1 Monday, Feb. 8--Sitting in Chambers -Non-witness list Tuesday, Feb. 9, to Saturday, Feb. 13– Friday, April 2--Motions and non-witness Witness list

list Monday, Feb. 15-Sitting in Chambers Saturday, April 3-Petitions, short causes, Tuesday, Feb. 16, to Thursday, Feb. 18- proeedure summonses, opposed petiNon-witness list

tions, and non-witness list Friday, Feb. 19–Motions and non-witness Monday, April 5--Sitting in Chambers list

Tuesday, April 6, to Thursday, April 8Saturday, Feb. 20—Petitions, short causes, Non-witness list

procedure summonses, opposed peti- Friday, April 9--Motions and non-witness tions, and non-witness list

list Monday, Feb. 22-Sitting in Chambers Saturday, April 10 - Petitions, short Tuesday, Feb. 23, to Thursday, Feb. 25- causes, opposed petitions, procedure -Non-witness list

summonses, and non-witness list Friday, Feb. 26-Motions and non-witness Monday, April 12-Sitting in Chamlist

bers Saturday, Feb. 27--Petitions, short causes, Tuesday, April 13, and Wednesday,

opposed petitions, procedure sum- April 14-Remaining motions, and nonmonses, and non-witness list

witness list. N.B.-If the witness list should be taken on any days other than those above appointed, due notice will be given. When the witness list is being taken, further considerations will not be taken on the Tuesdays.

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Any cause intended to be heard as a short cause must be so marked in the cause book at least one clear day before the same can be put in the paper to be so heard, and the necessary papers, including minutes of the proposed judgment or order, must be left with the judge's clerk one clear day before the cause is to be put into the paper.

Witness actions will probably be taken on other days than those mentioned above. of these due notice will be given.

CHANCERY COURT IV.-Before Mr. Justice KEKEWICH. The following will be the order of business according to the days of the week: Monday (including the first day of the sittings, Monday, Jan. 11), sitting in Chambers; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, general paper; Friday (except Jan. 22 and 29), motions and adjourned summonses. Tuesday, Jan. 12, will also be a motion day. In addition Mr. Justice Stirling's motions and unopposed petitions will be taken on Thursdays, Feb. 4 and 11. Saturday (except Jan. 28 and 30), short causes, petitions, and adjourned summonses. Actions for trial with witnesses will be taken on Tuesday, Jau. 19, and continued until the end of the following week. Motions and uuopposed petitions will be heard during that period by Mr. Justice Stirling. Actions for trial with witnesses will also be taken at other times. Notice will be given in the daily cause list.

Business in the Liverpool and Manchester district registries will be taken as follows:-Summonses in chambers on every other Friday afternoon, comtrencing with Friday, Jan. 15. Motions, short causes, petitions, and adjourned summonses on every other Saturday, commencing with Saturday, Jan. 16 (except Saturday, Jan. 30).

CHANCERY COURT III.-Before Mr. Justice ROMER. Actions transferred for trial or hearing only will be taken in the order in the cause list on every day of the sittings, from Jan. 11 to April 14, both inclusive.

Any cause intended to be heard as a short cause must be so marked in the cause book at least one clear day before the same can be put in the paper to be so heard. Two copies of minutes of the proposed judgment or order must be left in court with the judge's clerk one clear day before the cause is to be put in the paper.

N.B. The following papers on further consideration are required for the use of the judge, viz. :-Two copies of minutes of the proposed judgment or order, one copy pleadings, and one copy chief clerk's certificate, which must be left in court with the judge's clerk one clear day before the further consideration is ready to come into the paper.

CHANCERY COURT II.-Before Mr. Justice NORTH. Monday, Jan. 11-Motions and adjourned | Monday, March 1-Sitting in Chambers summonses

Tuesday, March 2, to Thursday, March 4 Tuesday, Jan. 12, to Thursday, Jan. 14- -General paper Adjourned summonses

Friday, March 5-Motions and adjourned Friday, Jan. 154Motions and adjourned summonses summonses

Saturday, March 6-Short causes, petiSaturday, Jan. 16-Short causes, petitions, tions, further considerations, and

further considerations, and adjourned adjourned summonses summonses

Monday, March 8-Sitting in Chambers Monday, Jan, 18-Sitting in Chambers Tuesday, March 9, to Thursday, March 11 Tuesday, Jan. 19, to Saturday, Jan. 23– -General paper Witness actions

Friday, March 12-Motions and adjourned Monday, Jan. 25-Sitting in Chambers summonses Tuesday. Jan. 26, to Saturday, Jan. 30— Saturday, March 13–Short causes, petiWitness actions

tions, further considerations,

and Monday, Feb. 1-Sitting in Chambers adjourned summonses Tuesday, Feb. 2, and Wedneday, Feb. 3- Monday, March 15--Sitting in Chambers Adjourned summonses

Tuesday, March 16, to Thursday, March 18 Thursday, Feb. 4-Motions for Mr. Justice -General paper

Chitty, and adjourned summonses Friday, March 19--Motions and adjourned Friday, Feb. 5-Motions and adjourned summonses summonses

Saturday, March 20-Short causes, petiSaturday, Feb. 6_Short cases, petitions tions, further considerations,

and (including unopposed petitions for Mr. adjourned summonses Justice Chitty), further considerations, Monday, March 22-Sitting in Chambers and adjourned summonses

Tuesday, March 23, to Thursday, March 25 Monday, Feb. 8-Sitting in Chambers -General paper Tuesday, Feb. 9, and Wednesday, Feb. 10 Friday, March 26--Motions and adjourned -Adjourned summonses

summonses Thursday, Feb. 11-Motions for Mr.Justice Saturday, March 27—Short causes, petiChitty, and adjourned summonses

tions, further considerations,

and Friday, Feb. 12-Motions and adjourned adjourned summonses summonses

Monday, March 29--Sitting in Chambers Saturday, Feb. 13-Short causes, petitions Tuesday, March 30, to Thursday, April 1 (including unopposed petitions for Mr.

--General paper Justice Chitty), further considerations, Friday, April 2-Motions and adjourned ' and adjourned summonses

summonses Monday, Feb. 13-Sitting in Chambers Saturday, April 3–Short causes, petitions, Tuesday, Feb. 16, to Thursday, Feb. 18— further considerations, and adjourned Adjourned summonses

summonses Friday, Feb. 19–Motions and adjourned Monday, April 5-Sitting in Chambers summonses

Tuesday, April 6, to Thursday, April 8– Saturday, Feb. 20-Short causes, petitions, General

paper further considerations, and adjourned Friday, April 9-Motions and adjourned summonses

summonses Monday, Feb. 22-Sitting in Chambers Saturday, April 10-Short causes, petiTuesday, Feb. 23, and Wednesday, Feb. 25 tions, further considerations,

and -General paper

adjourned summonses Friday, Feb. 26–Motions and adjourned Monday, April 12-Sitting in Chambers summonses

Tuesday, April 13–General paper Saturday, Feb. 27-Short causes, petitions. Wednesday, April 14 – Mutions and

further considerations, and adjourned adjourned summonses. summonses

Any cause intended to be heard as a short cause must be so marked in the cause book at least one clear day before the same can be put in the paper to be so heard. Two copies of minutes of the proposed judgment or order must be left in court with the judge's clerk the day before the cause is to be put in the paper.

If witness actions can be taken on any other days than those appointed due notice will be given.

LORD CHANCELLOR'S COURT.-Before Mr. Justice STIRLING. Monday, Jan. 11-Sitting in Chambers Monday, March 1-Sitting in Chambers Tuesday, Jan. 12 - Motions, adjourned Tuesday, March 2, to Thursday, March 4summonses, and general paper

General paper Wednesday, Jan. 13, and Thursday, Friday, March 5-Motions, adjourned sumJan. 14-General paper

monses, and general paper Friday, Jan. 15 - Motions, adjourned Saturday, March 6–Short causes, petisummonses, and general paper,

tions, adjourned summonses, and general Saturday, Jan. 16—Short causes, petitions, paper

adjourned summonses, and general Monday, March 8--Sitting in Chambers. paper

Tuesday, March 9, to Thursday, March 11Monday, Jan. 18—Sitting in Chambers

General paper Tuesday, Jan. 19, and Wednesday, Jan. 20 Friday, March 12-Motions, adjourned -General paper

summonses, and general paper Thursday, Jan. 21 - Motions for Mr. 'Saturday, March 13-Short causes, peti

Justice Kekewich and general paper tions, adjourned summonses, and general Friday, Jan. 22-Motions, adjourned sum- pa per monses, and general paper

Monday, March 15—Sitting in Chambers Saturday, Jan. 23-Short causes, petitions Tuesday, March 16, to Thursday, Jan. 18 (including unopposed petitions for Mr.

-General paper Justice Kekewich), adjourned sum- Friday, March 19-Motions, adjourned monses, and general paper

summonses, and general paper Monday, Jan. 25-Sitting in Chambers Saturday, March 20—Short causes, petiTuesday, Jan. 26, and Wednesday, Jan. 27 tions, adjourned summonses, and general -General paper

paper Thursday, Jan. 28 - Motions for Mr. Monday, March 22-Sitting in Chambers

Justice Kekewich and general paper Tuesday, March 23, to Thursday, Mar. 25 Friday, Jan. 29 - Motions, adjourned

-General paper summonses, and general paper

Friday, March 26 Motions, adjourned Saturday, Jan. 30-Short causes, petitions summonses, and general paper

(including unopposed petitions for Mr. Saturday, March 27-Short causes, petiJustice Kekewich), adjourned sum- tions, adjourned summonses, and general monses, and general paper

paper Monday, Feb. 1--Sitting in Chambers Monday, March 29—Sitting in Chambers Tuesday, Feb. 2, to Saturday, Feb, 6– Tuesday, March 30, to Thursday, April 1 Witness actions

-General paper Monday, Feb. 8-Sittings in Chambers Friday, April 2 – Motions, adjourned Tuesday, Feb. 9, to Saturday, Feb. 13– summonses, and general paper Witness actions

Saturday, April 3-Short causes, petitions, Monday, Feb. 15–Sitting in Chambers adjourned summonses, and general Tuesday, Feb. 16, to Thursday, Feb. 18— paper General paper

Monday, April 5--Sitting in Chambers Friday, Feb. 19 - Motions, adjourned Tuesday, April 6, to Thursday, April 8– summonses, and general paper

General paper Saturday, Feb. 20—Short causes, petitions, Friday, April 9 - Motions, adjourned

ad journed summonses, and general summonses, and general paper paper

Saturday, April 10-Short causes, petiMonday, Feb. 22-Sitting in Chambers tions, adjourned summonses,

and Tuesday, Feb. 23, to Thursday, Feb. 25- general paper General paper

Monday, April 12-Sitting in Chambers Friday, Feb. 26 Motions, adjourned Tuesday, April 13-General paper summonses, and general paper

Wednesday, April 14Motions, adjourned Saturday, Feb. 27-Short causes, petitions, summonses, and general paper.

adjourned summonses, and general paper

High Court of Justice.

Queen's Bench Division.

APPEALS AND MOTIONS IN BANKRUPTCY. Appeals for Hearing before a Divisional Court, Sitting in Bankruptcy,

from County Courts, pending Hilary 1897. Re Oborne; Ex parte Wheeler

Re Raatz; Ex parte Carlhian Re Bailey; Ex parte Andrews

Re Slater; Ex parte Slater Re Jubb; Ex parte Burman and another Re Higginson ; Ex parte Jobson Re Elston; Ex parte Taskar and Sons Re Riley (trading, &c.); Ex parte Riley Re Hawley: Er parte Ridgway and Sons and Son v. Ryan. Re Woodroff; Ex parte Woodroff Motions in Bankruptcy for Hearing before Mr. Justice Vaughan Williams,

pending Hilary 1897. Re Bottomley ; Ex parte Smith v. Haydon | Re Pepperell; Ex parte Pepperell v. Re Linton; Ex parte Debtor and Wife v. Oficial Receiver Brown, Janson, and Co.

Re Gray; Ex parte Official Receiver v. Re Same; Ex parte Same v. Walpole, Stewart and others Greenwell and Co.

Re Medhurst; Ex parte Bunting and others Re Same; Ex parte Same v. Janson, Cobb, v. James Pearson, and Co.

Re Tillett; Ex parte Harper v. Mrs. Re Same; Ex parte Mrs. Linton v. Brown, Tillett Janson, and Co.

Re Johnston ; Ex parte Drummond and Re Beauchamp Brothers; Ex parte Carr v. Co. v, James Trustee

Re Montague; Ex parte Ward v. L. & Re Jones, J. T. ; Ex parte Board of Trade S. W. Bank v. Trustee

Re Bradley ; Ex parte Salaman v. Pulleyne Re Minto ; Ex parte Same v. Same

and another Re Levy; Ex parte Quass v. White

Re Tetley ; Ex parte Jeffreys v. Dickson Re_ Buck; Ex parte Board of Trade v. Re Grimsdale; Ex parte Board of Trade t'. Trustee

Trustee Re Stephenson; Ex parte Brown v. Trenan Re Gallard; Er parte Gallard v. Harris Re Ashwin; Ex parte Pollock o. Ball Re Same; Er parte Same v. Same.

Matters in Bankruptcy.-- Total Appeals and Motions, 33.

Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty Division,

ADMIRALTY.

Actions for Trial.
Ship Adler
Ship Elizabeth Allen

Ship Propitious
Ship Annette Jantiene Ship Elizabeth

Ship Prinz Heinrich
Ship Armando, R.
Ship Elmwood

Ship Princess Clementine
Ship Aronmouth
Ship Elmfield

Ship Polana
Ship Balderton
Ship Falshar

Ship Queensland
Ship Bassano
Ship Fritz

Ship Queensmore
Ship Basuto
Ship Frank

Ship Rookwood
Ship Barlby
Ship Felbridge

Ship Roger
Ship Brilliant Star
Ship Free Lance

Ship Rosina
Ship Boucau
Ship Gustafoa

Ship Stanmore
Ship Burma
Ship General Dodds

Ship Sea Gull
Ship Brantwood
Ship Gulf of Bothnia

Ship Suallow
Ship Bruxelles
Ship Hinda

Ship Springbok
Ship Corso
Ship Huguenot

Ship Sando
Ship Canada
Ship Harborne

Ship Skjold
Ship Cotehele
Ship Hebble

Ship Scotia
Ship Carrie
Ship Jargoon

Ship Strathisla
Ship Caerloch
Ship Isaac Pinnock

Ship Stuart
Ship Cyril
Ship Jane Radclitie

Ship Sunshine
Ship Celynen
Ship Ituna

Ship Starlight
Ship Chelona
Ship Ingram

Ship Thule
Ship City of York
Ship J. E. Graham

Ship Tay
Ship Dido
Ship La Pallice

Ship Theodor Fischer
Ship Donegal
Ship Lockwood

Ship Trerarrack
Ship Emden

Ship Lavinia Westoll Ship Triton Eastern Steamship Com- Ship Minde

Ship Venezia pany v. London and India Ship March

Ship Vidar
Docks Joint Committee Ship Malvina
Ship Excelsior

Ship Vesta
Ship Menzaleh

Ship Wooloomooloo
Ship Edinburgh

Ship Northdene
Ship Ebro

Ship Walker
Ship verby

Ship Wasp
Ship Emily
Ship Oromaso

Ship W. D. Cruddas
Ship Express
Ship Orestes

Ship Winnebah.
Ship Earl of Deron

Appeal to the Divisional Court.

Ship Onward. Actions for trial, 98 ; Appeals to Divisional Court, 1; total 99. MEMORANDUM.-No complete list of acti ns to be tried in this division during Hilary Sittings can be given in advance, as the number and order in which they will be tried are necessarily dependent upon the presence in this country of seafaring witnesses whose movements are unavoidably uncertain. The list will therefore be subject to alterations and additions.

COURT OF APPEAL, AND HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE (CHAN

CERY DIVISION).-HILARY, SITTINGS 1897. ROTA OF REGISTRARS IN ATTENDANCE FOR THE WEEK ENDING

Jan. 23. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday, Frilay. Saturday. APPEAL CT. II. Carrington Jackson ... Carrington Jackson ... Carrington Jackson CHITTY, J. Pugh Lavie Pugh

Pugh Lavie NORTH, J....... Farmer Ward Farmer Carrington Farmer Pagh STIRLING, J. Ward Pemberton Ward Pemberton Ward Pemberton KEKEWICH, J. Beal Leach Beal

Leach Beal..... Leach ROMER, J....... Rolt ......... Godfrey ... Rolt ......... Godfrey

Rolt .........

Godfrey.

Lavie ....

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LEGAL OBITUARY.

PROBATE RULES. ADDITIONAL RULES AND ORDERS, DATED DECEMBER 11, 1896, FOR

THE REGISTRARS OF THE PRINCIPAL AND DISTRICT PROBATE

REGISTRIES WITH REGARD TO NON-CONTENTIOUS BUSINESS.
By virtue and in pursuance of the provisions of the statutes 20 & 21
Vict. c. 77, and 38 & 39 Vict. c. 77, I, the Right Honourable Sir Francis
Henry Jeune, Knight, President of the Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty
Division of the High Court of Justice, with the concurrence of the Right
Hon. Hardinge Stanley, Baron Halsbury, Lord High Chancellor of Great
Britain, and of the Right Hon. Charles, Baron Rassell of Killowen,
Lord Chief Justice of England, do make and issue the following additional
rules and orders for the registrars of the principal and district probate
registries with regard to non-contentious business.
Dated the 11th Dec. 1896.

F. H. JEUNE, P.
Approved.

HALSBURY, C.

RUSSELL OF KILLOWEN, C.J. Additional Rule and Order for the Registrars of the Principal and

District Probate Registries. "In any case in which it is intended to apply for the resealing in Ireland of any grant of probate or letters of administration made in the Probate Division of the High Court of Justice in England, the executor or administrator may deposit in the principal or district probate registry where the grant has been made a copy of such grant of probate or letters of administration, together with the original and any certificate or certificates that may be required, and the fees payable in Ireland in respect of such resealing, and the registrar shall transmit by post the documents so deposited, together with such fees to the registrar of the principal probate registry in Ireland, for the purpose of such grant being resealed under the provisions of 20 & 21 Vict. c. 79, s. 94.”

The number of this rule for the principal registry is 107; and for the district registries is 102. Further additional Rule and Order for the Registrars of the Principal

Probate Registry. “ The registrar of the principal probate registry in England shall, upon receiving by post from a probate registry in Ireland any grant of probate or letters of administration made in the Probate and Matrimonial Division of the High Court of Justice in Ireland, together with a copy thereof, and any certificate or certificates that may be required, and the fees payable in England in respect of the resealing of an Irish grant, cause such grant to be resealed in conformity with the provisions of 20 & 21 Vict. c 79, s. 95, and shall transmit the grant so resealed to the registrar of the probate registry in Ireland from whom it was received.

The number of this rule is 108.

Mr. RICHARD VIGORS DOYNE, barrister-at-law, who for many years appeared in Indian cases before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, died suddenly a few days ago in his seventy-third year. In his early career he had a lucrative practice in Calcutta, and at the commencement of the sixties he, in conjunction with one or two other gentlemen, opened up the well-known and extensive Singel tea garden in Darjeeling. His death will be regretted by a large circle of friends. He was called to the Bar in 1854.

Mr. HENRY DAVIDSON, barrister-at-law, of the Inner Temple, died on the 7th inst. Born in Feb. 1837, he was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and University. He afterwards went to Cambridge, where he took a Wrangler's degree in 1859, and LL.B. in 1860. He was elected a Fellow of Trinity Hall. On being called to the Bar in 1862, he obtained a good practice as a junior at the Parliamentary Bar until he was appointed one of the secretaries to the Cambridge University Commission. At the time of death he was auditor of the Inner Temple.

Mr. F. W. GUNDRY, a well-known Dorset solicitor, of Slape House, Netherby, near Bridport, died on the 4th inst., after a brief illness, at the age of seventy-three. Deceased held various public appointments, including that of the town clerk of Bridport, clerk of the borough and county bench, president of the Dorset Law Society, and various other offices. He leaves a widow and an only son-Mr. Harold Gundry, barrister on the Western Circuit. The daceased was admitted in 1846.

THE GAZETTES.

Professional Partnerships Dissolved.

GAZETTE, JAN. 8. TALBOT, PEMBERTON ERNEST John, and Foutrex, STEPHEN GEORGE, soliciters,

Andover. Jan. 1. Debts by P. E. J. Talbot, who will continue to practise under style of Footner, Son, and Talbot. S. J. Footner will practise on his own &ccount.

GAZETTE, JAN. 12. ENSOR, FREDERICK WILLIAM; WARD, CHARLES ALBERT JOHn; and GILLING, HENRY

THOMAS, solicitors, Cardiff ; so far as regards F. W. Ensor. May 16, 1896. Debts by C. A. J. Ward and H. T. Gilling, who will continue the business under style of

Ensor. Ward, and Gilling. HUGHES, FRANCIS EDWARD, and SWEET-ESCOTT, WILLIAM SYDNEY, solicitors, Cardiff.

Jan. 1. Debts by W. S. Sweet-Escott, who will continue to carry on the practice

under style of Hughes and Swe-t-Escott. MOODIE, JOHN; MILLS, JOHN; and MOODIE, HERBERT Joux, solicitors, Dunedin

House, Basinghall-av, City. Dec. 25, 1896. Debts by either Messrs. Moodie and

Son, Dunedin House, or J. Mills, 284, Basingball-st. E.C. WARD, 'JOHN EDWARD: COLBORNF, GEORGE FRANCIS; and COULMAN, EDWARD,

solicitors, Newport (Mon.). Dec. 31, 1896. Debts by G. F. Colborne and E. Coulman, who will continue to carry on tbe business under style of Ward, Colborne, and Coulman.

NORTHERN CIRCUIT- WINTER ASSIZES-FEBRUARY

MARCH, 1897. The Commissions for holding these Assizes will be opened at Appleby on Wednesday the 10th Feb., at Carlisle, on Friday the 12th Feb., at Lancaster, on Wednesday the 17th Feb., at Manchester, on Monday the 22nd Feb., and at Liverpool, on Wednesday the 10th March.

Civil business at Appleby, Carlisle, and Lancaster will commence as soon as the criminal business is disposed of; at Manchester, on Tuesday the 23rd Feb., at 11 a.m., and at Liverpool, on Thursday the 11th March, at 11 a.m.

In pursuance of Order XXXVI., r. 22B, and by leave of the judges appointed to go the above circuit, causes for trial, where notice of trial Ihas been given, can now be entered with the Associate, at his office, 1, Chapel-street, Preston, or at the District Registries, during office hours, at any time not later than 4 p.m. of the day next but one before the Commission day, Sunday excepted.

On entering a cause, two copies of the pleadings must be lodged, one for the use of the judge, and the other for the Associate. The necessary £2 stamp must in all cases accompany the pleadings. Money will not be received.

The nature of the actions must be shortly indorsed on the pleadings, e.g., “ slander” “goods sold.” The notice of trial must not be indorsed.

The trial of special jury causes will commence at Manchester on "Thursday, the 25th Feb., and at Liverpool on Saturday, the 13th March, at the sitting of the Court, unless otherwise ordered.

A list of causes for trial each day at Manchester and Liverpool will be posted in the corridor of the court and in the library, at 3.30 p.m. on the preceding day. On the first day at Manchester and Liverpool the Court will not go beyond the eighth common jury cause.

The Civil Court at Manchester and Liverpool will, in the absence of special circumstances, sit at 10.30 a.m., and rise not later than 5.30 p.m,

By order of the Judges,

ARTHUR SHUTTLEWORTH, Associate, Associate's Office, Preston, 9th Jan. 1897. The Associate's fees must be paid in judicature stamps.

To avoid correspondence and delay, solicitors are requested to apply to the Associate for their certificates during the assizes, and afterwards at his office in Preston.

No certificates will be given out unless the proper £1 stamp is provided. Money will not be received.

N.B.-Where a cause in the list has been settled, immediate notice thereof must be given to the Associate by the party who entered it.

Bankrupts.
THE BANKRUPTCY ACTS 1883 AND 1890.

RECEIVING ORDERS.

GAZETTE, JAN. 8. To surrender at the High Court of Justice, in Bankruptcy. BRAYE, JOIN, Brompton-eq. Pet. Dec. 12. Order, Jan. 8. COHEN, NATHANIEL, Newbury-st, stationer. Pet. Nov. 26. Order, Jan. 5. MASON, FREDERICK, Acre-la, Brixton, manufacturer of meat essences. Pet. Jan. 6.

Order, Jan. 6. SURGUY, Tuomas MATTHEW, Sutton-st, Commercial-rd, undertaker. Pet. Jan. 4. Order, Jan. 4.

To surrender at their respective District Courts. BOND, MORGAN GEORGE, Bridgend, baker. Ct. Cardiff. Order, Dec. 15. Pet. Jan. 5. BROADHURST, STEPHEN, Kinlet, farmer. Ct. Kidderminster. Pet. Dec. 21. Order,

Dec. 21. BARROWS, DAVID Toomas, Mansfield, boot manufacturer. Ct. Nottingham. Pet.

Jan. 4. Order, Jan. 4.
BROTHERHOOD, JAMES, Tunbridge Wells, cattle dealer. Ct. Tunbridge Wells. Pet.

Jan. 4. Order, Jan. 4.
CLAFTON, WILLIAM HENRY, Leeds, woollen manufacturer. Ct. Leeds.

Pet.
Dec. 31. Order, Dec. 31.
CURRY, EDWIN LAWRENCE, Leicester, hairdresser. Ct. Leicester. Pet. Jan. 6. Order,

Jan. 6. Dixon, JOSEPH CAWKWELL (trading as Dixon and Co.), Bradford, Yorks, worsted

manufacturer. Ct. Bradford. Pet. Jan. 2. Order, Jan. 2. EVITT, ALBERT (late trading with Joseph Cawkwell Dixon as Dixon and Co.),

Baadford, Yorks, late worsted manufacturer. Ct Bradford. Pet. Jan. 2. Order.

Jan. 2. ELLIS, JOHN PHILLIPS, Millbrook, baker. Ct. Plymouth and East Stonehouse. Pet.

Jan. 6. Order, Jan. 6. FRENCH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Plymouth, fisherman, Ct. Plymouth and East Stone

house. Pet. Jan. 6. Order, Jan. 6. FLETCHER, WILLIAM, Ratby, baker. Ct. Leicester. Pet. Jan. 6. Order, Jan 6. JELLY, HERBERT, Hirwain, builder. Ct. Aberdare. Pet. Jan. 4. Order, Jan. 4. LISCHEID, R., Stoke Newington, baker. Ct. Edmonton Pet. Dec. 14. Order, Jan. 4. LOCKWOOD. RICHARD EVISON, Belle Vue, labourer. Ct. Wakefield. Pet. Jan. 5.

Order, Jan. 5. MANTON, MATTHEW, Colwall, cab proprietor. Ct. Worcester. Pet. Jan. 4. Order

Jan. 4. MABE, ALFRED, Templeton, farmer. Ct. Pembroke Dock. Pet. Jan. 4. Order,

Jan. 4.

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