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The measurement of granite differs slightly from that of ordinary stonework. This material being rarely sawn, the labor “half-sawing" never

The backs of the stones, if against brickwork and not left rough, should be measured and described as “backs against brickwork picked square."

The beds and joints are described as plain picked," and sank and molded work as “ finely axed."

Carving is best treated by including a provisional sum in the bill. In such case the bosting will be taken with the labors on the stone. It is, however, often measured ; if so, it should be described as “including bosting and working in the faces and moldings to the carving after the carvers."

Stone rubble walling is seldom used it London, but in districts where stonework is considerably cheaper than brickwork its use becomes a necessity. The usual method of measurement is by the yard cube ; footings being kept separate from the ordinary work and described as “ walling in large fat-bedded stones to footing courses.” A note should appear at the head of the bill for this work stating tbat the price for the walling is to include for levelling to damp courses, wall plates, strings, &c. Facings are measured separately per foot super for the extra value over walling ; quoins in large stones or with better finish than the remainder of the facework being taken per foot run as extra on the facing. Raking and circular cutting, discharging arches, &c., are measured in the same way as if executed in brickwork ; smoke flues, however, should be numbered, giving size and height, and stating also whether welling deducted or not.

It is interesting to note some of the differences between the measurement of stonework in London and in the provinces.

A curious practice exists in Edinburgh of measuring all hewn stonework (i.e. what would here be called wronght stonework), as extra over rubble walling; the stone generally, if in large sizes, being measured by the foot cube and the labors thereon taken separately, with the exception of beds and joints, which are included with the cube stone. Moldings are kept separate according to girth and position as feet lineal working 14-inch girth cornice molding," “ ditto 12-inch girth architrave molding." Strings, cills, mullions, cornices, and the like are taken at per foot run ; the total girth of plain, sunk, and molded work being stated in all cases as “molded cornice 21-inch by 10-inch girth of weathered and molded edge 25-inch.”

The Manchester method differs from ours only in a few cases. It is customary there to allow, when measuring cube stone, 1 inch each way beyond the net dimensions of each block when worked, and also to mention if special appliances for hoisting as travelling cranes are required. What is here called “stopped molded work” is described as sunk molded work," a term which at first sight seems very singular.

Statistics.

CORN PRICES.

RETURN OF THE QUANTITIES SOLD AND AVERAGE PRICES OF

BRITISH CORN, IMPERIAL MEASURE, AS RECEIVED FROM THE
INSPECTORS AND OFFICERS OF EXCISE DURING THE UNDER-
MENTIONED PERIODS.

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PROFESSIONAL NOTES.

SECTION 1.

SHORT PAPERS.

The Practice of Hydrogeology.

The provis ons of the Local Government Act, 1894 (commonly ki.own as the Parish Councils Act), as to water supply are chiefly contained in the Public Health Act, 1875, a.d the Public Health (Water) Act, 1878. By Section 12 of the Public Health Act, 1875, in the absence of any private Act, the water supply, among other properties, became vested in the Council of any Borough, Improvement Commissioners, or Local Board, or Board of Guardians, as the Local Sanitary Authority for their district. The Local Board, or Board of Guardians, was succeeded as the Sanitary Authority under Section 25 (1) of the Parish Councils Act, 1894, by the Rural District Council. in whom the powers to carry out schemes of water supply for their district under the provisions of the Public Health Act, 1875, became vested.

Section 8 of the Parish Councils Act, 1894, “Ad“ ditional powers of Parish Council,” (1) (e), empowers the Parish Council “ to utilise any well, spring, or “ stream within their parish, and provide facilities for

obtaining water therefrom, but so as not to interfere with the rights of any person or corporation ;” and

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