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LIST OF AUTHORS.

ALLEN, Mary W., 71. ANDERSEN, HANS C., 109. AUDUBON, JOHN J., 175. AYTOUN, W. E., 328. BAKER, SIR S. W., 84, 89. BANKS, G. LINNÆUS, 58. BEECHER, H. W., 170, 459. BRYANT, WILLIAM C., 459. BURKE, EDMUND, 459. BYRON, LORD, 460. Cary, ALICE, 197. CHANNING, W. E., 460. CHESTERFIELD, P. D. S., 459. CLEMENS, S. L., 219. COLERIDGE, S. T., 459. COLTON, W., 461. COOPER, J. F., 261, 268. COWPER WILLIAM, 460, 462. CUTTER, G. W., 273. DANA, R. H., JR., 106. DICKENS, CHARLES, 212. DRAKE, JOSEPH R., 405. DRAKE, S. A., 387. DRYDEN, JOHN, 461. EMERSON, R. W., 459, 460. FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN, 461. GOLDSMITH, OLIVER, 152.

Gosse, P. H., 193.
GRAY, JOHN HENRY, 408.
GRAY, THOMAS, 435.
HALE, MATTHEW, 294.
HAWTHORNE, N., 60, 64.
HEADLEY, J. T., 251, 254.
HEMANS, FELICIA D., 114.
HOLLAND, J. G., 94.
HOLMES, O. W., 459.
HUGHES, Thomas, 144.
HUNTER, ALEX., 180.
HUNT, FREEMAN, 158, 289, 321.
IRVING, WASHINGTON, 342, 348.
JERROLD, DOUGLAS, 166.
KANE, ELISHA KENT, 356, 362.
KING, EDWARD, 187.
KINGSLEY, CHARLES, 317, 462.
LARCOM, LUCY, 259.
LONGFELLOW, HENRY W., 380,

460, 461, 462.
LUBBOCK, Sir John, 49, 53.
MACAULAY, T. B., 339.
MAHONEY, JEREMIAH, 184.
MARTINEAU, HARRIET, 132.
MAURY, M. F., 140.
MILLER, HUGH, 282.
O'Hara, THEODORE, 367.

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OSGOOD, KATE P., 164.
PARBODIE, W. J., 126.
PARKMAN, FRANCIS, 307.
PERCY, FLORENCE, 42.
PHELPS, W. F., 239.
PICKARD, J. C., 33, 38.
PoE, EDGAR A., 454.
PRESCOTT, W. H., 383.
READ, T. B., 151.
ROBBINS, Mrs. R. D. C., 120.
RUSKIN, JOHN, 331, 462.
SCHUYLER, EUGENE, 276.
Scott, SIR W., 205, 227, 232,

461.
SHAKSPEARE, WILLIAM, 422,

459, 461, 462. SMITH, HERBERT H., 396.

STEELE, Mrs. J. D., 335.
SWIFT, JONATHAN, 460, 461.
TAYLOR, BAYARD, 173.
Taylor, BENJAMIN F., 201, 313,

354, 419.
TENNYSON, ALFRED, 248, 460.
THORPE, Rosa H., 209. .
THOMSON, JAMES, 459.
TYNDALL, JOHN, 370.
WALLACE, A. R., 96, 100, 128.
WARBURTON, 428.
WELCH, RODNEY, 243.
WHITTAKER, FREDERICK, 224.
WHITTIER, J. G., 82, 392, 460.
Woolson, CONSTANCE F., 135.
YONGE, CHARLOTTE M., 376,

440, 446.

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ELEPHANT HUNTING. Paul Frenzeny. Paul Del Orme. 87 SOLDIER'S REPRIEVE C. M. McIlhenney .J. A. Bogert. 122 EXPLOIT OF WALLACE . Schell & Hogan. Samuel Davis. 208 CUSTER's Last CHARGE. W. M. Cary . Horace Baker. 226 THE “ ARIEL”.

E. R. Tichenor. 272 LITTLE MABEL .

J. S. Davis

H. W. Miller. 300 WIDOW OF GLENCOE. George White . W. Mollier. 330

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Elocution is the art of using the voice for the proper expression of thought.

The divisions under which Elocution will be considered are Pronunciation and Expression.

Before undertaking to put in application any system of rules for delivery, we must thoroughly understand the thoughts to be expressed. To listen to good reading will educate us for the expression of thought; but in no sense is it true that elocution can be learned by exact imitation. Our observation of another's performance may give us the general theory of expression; but our own improvement must depend altogether upon our own labors. "Practice makes perfect” is the motto constantly to be borne in mind: yet it must be intelligent practice, and not blind imitation, which can result only in making mechanical readers.

PRONUNCIATION.

Pronunciation treats of the Elementary Sounds of he Language, Articulation, Syllabication, cent.

The Phonic Chart on page 32 contains a list of the elementary sounds with their equivalents; and the continued practice upon syllabication and accent in all the books of this series, makes it unnecessary to repeat in abstract form what has already been mastered by experience.

ARTICULATION.

Articulation is the act of uttering the elementary sounds, either separately or together in syllables.

One meaning of the word articulate is to join or unite, and the meaning of articulation as used in elocution is to utter words so as to exhibit every joint, i.e., elementary sound.

one

A vowel by itself is easily sounded, and a syllable containing one vowel and

consonant usually presents no difficulty; but where two, three, or more consonants are joined with a single vowel, considerable effort is sometimes necessary to articulate them correctly.

Examples. Well, twelve, twelfth, twelfths; read, breadth, breadths.

The accented syllable of a long word may be in such a position as to render the articulation of the other syllables very difficult.

Examples.- Dis' so lu ble, ex'e cra ble, for' mi da ble.

The repetition of the same or similar sounds increases the difficulty of articulation.

Examples.- With this speech. This is a last surprise.

In the last two examples we may articulate so poorly as to change the meaning; as, With his peach. This is alas surprise.

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A faulty articulation can be much improved by pronouncing words in a whisper.

This exercise does away with the use of loud speaking to counteract a poor articulation. As soon as we understand that words are made up principally of consonants, and

that consonants have little or no sound of themselves, we see the importance of forming them correctly.

Suggestion.- Let the class practice occasionally upon the consonants, using such exercises as the following:

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