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det him next in his Preaching, which was always upon Useful 'Texts; for his Aim was not to speak to the Heads and Ears, but moreover to the Hearts of his Auditors; which he also the rather did by his affectionate Way of Delivery, and so as it were by one Fire kindling another. He had indeed no good Voice; yet he knew how to make the best of it, and to give every Word its due Weight. He was not for any Harangues, but very much for Method in his Sermons, which made them both the more taking, every Head being as it were a frelh Subje£t; and also the more ufeful, as being the more easily remembred. And indeed Merhod is a wonderful Help to Memory; and so much the greater, and therefore the better, the more Easy and Natural it is. And this I the rather mention, because tho' at his own Cure he used to enlarge extempore, yet he ftudied the Heads of his Sermons, and took Notes of them and indeed, as to himself, there was no need of doing more, he having besides a Quickness of Invention, a Volubility of Tongue, and a Supply of Confidence, a great Presence of Mind, which are all neceffary to preaching unwritten, He had moreover another Help always at Command, to wit, his First Book, which being as it were a Body of Divinity, ( and he absolute Master thereof) has, as he has told me, upon Occafion been very serviceable to him. As to his Diligence in Preaching, I refer you to Mrs. Keitlewell, which if I mistake not, was commonly, if not constantly, Twice a Day ; which I look upon as very convenient' in grear Towns, to keep the Flock from straggling abroad, or from falling into the Hands of other Shepherds that come not in at the right Door. He was indeed a true Shepherd, according to our Saviour's own Character

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Consent render them extorted. But give me the Kindness, and the Honey (sweet alike) that comes without prefling. He was moreover a very temperate Person, fo far from being guilty at any time of Excess, that he did not so much as mind the indulging of his Appetite, or gratifying his Palate : And that not for want of Taste, but out of Self-denial, according to that of the Poet,

EN Virtus placitis, &c. · Yet that he might not seem to affect Singularity, his Rule, to my Knowledge, was that of St. Paul ( in the Letter, tho' not in the Sense) námely, to partake of whatsoever was set before him, without any Observation, except that of Moderation and Thankfulness: So that whatsoever he ate or dank, or whatsoever he did else, he might be said to do all to the Glory of God.

I shall consider Mr. Kettlewell next in his Wrritings, in his Sermons, and in his Prayers. And first in his Writings, which I shall not go about to give any particular Account of, but only suggest to you, that in all of them he had an Eye to the Practical Part, as well as to the Initructive; knowing that as without Understaanding, fo alfo without doing his Duty, a Man is certainly defe&tive, either blind or lame : For this I shall only give the Instance of his Practical Believer. Another thing I would hint to you, to wit, That in all his Discourses he had regard not only to the Learned, but also to the meaner Capacity, for which he thought nothing could be too plain; which is the Reason, to my Knowledge, why some things which might have been expressed shorter, are at large; and others, which might have been omitred, are repeated. Secondly, I shall confi

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det him next in his Preaching, which was always upon Useful Texts; for his Aim was not to speak to the Heads and Ears, but moreover to the Hearts of his Auditors, which he also the rather did by his affectionate Way of Delivery, and so as it were by one Fire kindling another. He had indeed no good Voice; yet he knew how to make the best of it, and to give every Word its due Weight. He was not for any Harangues, bút very much for Method in his Sermons, which made them both the more taking, every Head being as it were a frelh Subje£t; and also the more ufeful, as being the more easily remembred. And indeed Method is a wonderful Help to Memory; and so much the greater, and therefore the better, the more Easy and Natural ic js. And this I the rather mention, because tho' at his own Cure he used to enlarge 'extempore, yet he studied the Heads of his Sermons, and took Notes of them ; and indeed, as to himself, there was no need of doing more, he having besides a Quickness of Invention, a Volubility of Tongue, and a Supply of Confidence, a grear Presence of Mind, which are all neceffary to preaching unwritten, He had moreover another Help always at Command, to wit, his First Book, which being as it were a Body of Divinity, ( and he absolute Master thereof) has, as he has told me, upon Occafion been very serviceable to him. As to his Di ligence in Preaching, I refer you to Mrs. Kettlewell, which if I mistake not, was commonly, if not constantly, Twice a Day; which I look upon as very convenient' in great Towns, to keep the Flock from straggling abroad, or from falling into the Hands of other Shepherds that come not in at the right Door. He was indeed a true Shepherd, according to our Saviour's own Charaéter

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Modesty, which in a Matter so nearly concern. " ed his own present Interest, he would never be " induced to enter into a Discourse about it. Of which reserved Modesty his Lordship did often take particular Notice to some of his nearest Relations. Tho' for my part, I think in that respect he was over modest: For tho' he might have wav'd a Difcourse concerning his own Interest, yet he should not have over-looked that of the Church, which were constitute together. I pray God preserve your Life and Health, that you may be able to finish more good Undertakings, (as you have done some of late) for the further Benefit of the Publick; and remain, with very great Re spect,

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