The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, 36. köide

Front Cover
Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779
0 Reviews
Arvustused pole kinnitatud, aga Google kontrollib neid võltssisu suhtes ja eemaldab selle.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 188 - Along the ftreet the new-made brides are led, "With torches flaming, to the nuptial bed : The youthful dancers in a circle bound To the foft flute, and cittern's filver found: Through the fair ftreets, the matrons in a row 57$ •Stand in their porches, and enjoy
Page 264 - when autumn weighs) And o'er the feebler (tars exerts his rays; 40 Terrific glory ! for his burning breath Taints the red air with fevers, plagues, and death. So flam'd his fiery mail. Then wept the fage ; He ftrikes his reverend head: now white with age
Page 348 - began ; 645 > They bore as heroes, but they felt 'as man. } Satiate at length with unavailing woes, From the high throne divine Achilles rofe; The reverend monarch by the hand he rais'd ; On his white beard and form majeftic gaz'd, 650 Not unrelenting : then ferene began With words to foothe the miferable man : Alas
Page 105 - Automedon (an honour'd name, The fecond to his lord in love and fame, In peace his friend, and partner of the war) 180 The winged courfers harnefs'd to the car; Xanthus and Balius, of immortal breed, Sprung from the wind, and like the wind in fpeed; Whom the wing'd Harpy, fwift Podarge, bore, By Zephyr pregnant
Page 264 - What gafping numbers now had bit the ground! Thou robb'ft me of a glory juftly mine, Powerful of Godhead, and of fraud divine : Mean fame, alas ! for one of heavenly ftrain, To cheat a mortal, who repines in vain. 30 Then to the city terrible and ftrong, With high and haughty fteps he
Page 278 - gate. He ceas'd. The Fates fuppreft his labouring breath, And his eyes ftiffen'd at the hand of death ; To the dark realm the fpirit wings its way 455 (The manly body left a load of clay) And plaintive glides along the dreary coaft, A naked, wandering, melancholy ghoft ! Achilles,
Page 279 - (Unworthy of himfelf and of the dead). The nervous ancles bor'd, his feet he bound With thongs inferted through the double wound ; Thefe fix'd up high behind the rolling wain, His graceful head was trail'd along the plain. 500 Proud on his car th
Page 337 - come, A willing ghoft to Pluto's dreary dome ! He faid, and feebly drives his friends away: The forrowing friends his frantic rage obey. 310 Next on his fons his erring fury falls,. Polites, Paris, Agathon, he calls ; His threats Dei'phobus and Dius hear, . Hippothoiis, Pammon, Helenus the feer, And generous Antiphon : for yet thefe nine
Page 3 - Thrice happy race ! that, innocent of blood, From milk, innoxious, feek their fimple food : Jove fees delighted ; and avoids the fcene Of guilty Troy, of arms, and dying men : No aid, he deems, to either hoft is given, 15 While his high law fufpends the powers of Heaven. Mean-time the • Monarch of the
Page 37 - of war to us not idly given, Lo ! Greece is humbled, not by Troy, but Heaven. Vain are the hopes that haughty mind imparts, To force our fleet: the Greeks have hands, and hearts. Long ere in flames our lofty navy fall, Your boafted city and your god-built wall Shall fink beneath us, fmoaking on the ground;

Bibliographic information