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WHERE ARE THE VISIONS.'
AIR.- Unknown.

1. “ Where are the visions that round me once hover'd,

Forms that had grace in their shadows alone,
Looks, fresh as light from a star just discover'd,
And voices that music might take for her own ?”

II.
Time, while I spoke, with his wings resting o'er me,

Heard me say " where are those visions, oh, where?"
And, pointing his wand to the sun-set before me,
Said, with a voice like the hollow wind,“ There!"

III.
Fondly I look’d, when the wizard had spoken,

On to the dim-shining ruins of Day,
And there, in that light, like a talişman broken,
Saw the bright fragments of Hope melt away.

IV.
“ Oh! lend me thy wings, Time," I hastily utter'd,

Impatient to catch the last glimmer that shone; But scarcely again had the dark wizard flutter'd

His wing o'er my head, ere the light all was gone.

WIND THY HORN, MY HUNTER BOY.

German Air.

I.

Wind thy horn, iny hunter boy,

And leave thy lute's in glorious sighs,
Hunting is the hero's joy,

Till war his nobler game supplies;
Hark! the hound-bells ringing sweet,
While Hunters shout, and the woods repeat,
Hilli-ho! Hilli-ho!

II.
Wind again thy cheerful horn,

Till Echo, faint with answ'ring, dies, Burn, bright torches, burn till morn,

And lead us where the wild boar lies.

Hark! the cry,"he's found, he's found,”
While hill and valley our shouts resound,

Hilli-ho! Hilli-ho !

OH! GUARD OUR AFFECTION.

Scotch Air

I,
Oh! guard our affection, and ne'er let it feel
The blight, which this world o'er the warmest will steal.-
While the faith of all round us is fading or past,
Let our truth, at least, keep its bloom to the last!

II,
It is safer for Love to be watchful and weep,
As he us’d in his prime, than go smiling to sleep.-
For death on his slumber, cold death follows fast,
While the Love that is wakeful lives on to the last.

III. And tho', as Time gathers his clouds o'er our head, A shade, somewhat darker, o'er life they may spread; Yet transparent, at least, be the shadow they cast, So that Love's soften'd light may shine through to the last.

SLUMBER, OH! SLUMBER.
AIR.- Unknown.

I. "Slumber, oh! slumber, if sleeping, thou mak'st My heart beat so wildly, I'm lost, when thou wak'st!"

Thus sung I to a maiden,

Who slept one summer's day,
And like a flow'r o'erladen

With noon-tide sunshine, lay,
Slumber, oh! slumber, if sleeping, thou makost
My heart beat so wildly, I'm lost when thou wak'st!

II.

“Breathe not, oh, breathe not, ye winds, o'er her cheeks, If mute thus she charm me, I'm lost when she speaks.”

Thus sing I, while awaking,

She murmurs words, that seem,
As if her lips were taking

Farewell of some sweet dream.
Breathe not, oh breathe not, ye winds, o'er her cheeks,
If murm'ring she charm thus, I'm lost when she speaks.

BRING THE BRIGHT GARLANDS HITHER.

Russian Air.

I.
Bring the bright garlands hither,

Ere yet a leaf is dying;
If so soon they must wither,

Ours be their last sweet sighing.
Hark! that low, dismal chime,
"Tis the dreary voice of Time.
Oh! bring beauty, bring roses,

Bring all that yet is ours,-
Let life's day, as it closes,
Shine to the last through flow'rs.

II.
Haste, ere the bowl's declining,

Drink of it now or never,-
Now while Beauty is shining,

Love, or she's lost for ever.
Hark! again that dull chime!
'Tis the dreary voice of Time.-
Oh! if Life be a torrent,

Down to oblivion going,—
Like this cup be its current-

Bright to the last drop flowing !

IF IN LOVING, SINGING.

Spanish Air.

I.
If in loving, singing, night and day,
We could trifle merily life away,
Like atoms, dancing in the beam,
Or day-flies skimming o'er the stream ;

Like summer odours, born to sigh
Their sweetness out and die.

11.
How brilliant, thoughtless, side by side,
Thou and I could make our minutes glide!
No atoms ever play'd so bright,
No day-flies ever danc'd so light,
Nor odours ever mix'd their sigh,
So close as thou and I.

TOO PLAIN, ALAS!
French Air.

I.
Too plain, alas ! my doom is spoken,

Nor canst thou veil the sad truth o'er; Thy heart is chang'd, thy vow is brokenThou loy'st no more_thou lov'st no more.

II.
Tho' kindly still those eyes behold me,

The smile is gone which once they wore ! Tho'fondly still those arms enfold me, 'Tis not the same-thou lov'st no more!

III.
Too long my dream of bliss believing,

I've thought thee all thou wert before;
But now, alas! there's no deceiving.
'Tis all too plain thou lov'st no more.

IV. Oh! thou as soon the dead could'st waken

As lost affection's life restore ; Give peace to her that is forsaken,

Or bring back him, who loves no more.

WHEN ABROAD IN THE WORLD.

Italian Air.

1.' When abroad, in the world thou appearest,

And the young and the lovely are there,

To my heart while of all thou'rt the dearest

To my eyes thou’rt of all the most fair.
They pass, one by one, like waves of the sea,
That say to the sun“ See, how bright we can be !"

But where's the light, like thine,

In sun and shade to shine,
No, no—’mong them all there is nothing like thee.

II.
When of old, without farewell or warning,

Beauty's self us'd to steal from the skies
Wrap a mist round her head of a morning,

And post down to earth in disguise ! No matter what crowd around her might be, Men peep'd thro' the cloud, and whisper'd“ 'tis she !"

So, thou, where thousands are,

Dost shine the only star.
No, no-'mong them all there is nothivg like thee.

KEEP THOSE EYES STILL PURELY MINE.

German Air.

I.
Keep those eyes still purely mine,

Tho' far off I be;
When they most for others shine,
Then think they're turn’d on me.

II.
Should those lips, as now, respond,

To sweet minstrelsy,-
When their accents seem most fond,
Then think they're breath'd for me.

III.
Make what hearts thou wilt thy own,

If when all on thee
Fix their charmed thoughts alone,

Thou think'st the while on me.

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