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Swiss Air.-Ranz des Vaches."

But, wake the trumpet's blast again,

And rouse the ranks of warrior-men! Oh War! when Truth thy arm employs, And Freedom's spirit guides the labouring storm, 'Tis then thy vengeance takes a hallow'd form,

And, like Heaven's lightning, sacredly destroys!
Nor, Music! through thy breathing sphere,
Lives there a sound more grateful to the ear

Of Him who made all harmony,
Than the bless'd sound of fetters breaking,

And the first hymn that man, awaking
From Slavery's slumber, breathes to Liberty !

Spanish Chorus.
Hark! from Spain, indignant Spain,
Bursts the bold, enthusiast strain,
Like morning's music on the air!
And seems, in every note, to swear
By Sarragossa's ruin'd streets,

By brave Gerona's deathful story,
That, while one Spaniard's life-blood beats,
That blood shall stain the conqueror's glory!

Spanish Air.—Ya Desperto.”
But ah! if vain the patriot's zeal,
If neither valour's force, nor wisdom's light
Can break or melt that blood-cemented seal
Which shuts so close the book of Europe's right-
What song shall then in sadness tell

Of broken pride, of prospects shaded,

Of buried hopes, remember'd well,
Of ardour quench’d, and honour faded ?
What muse shall mourn the breathless brave,

In sweetest dirge at Memory's shrine ?
What harp shall sigh o'er Freedom's grave?

Oh Erin! Thine!

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BLACK AND BLUE EYES.

1.
The brilliant black eye

May in triumph let fly
All its darts, without caring who feels 'em;

But the soft eye of blue,

Though it scatter wounds too,
Is much better pleased when it heals 'em.

Dear Fanny! dear Fanny!
The soft eye of blue,

Though it scatter wounds too,
Is much better pleased when it heals'em, dear Fanny !

II.
The black eye may say,

" Come and worship my ray,
“By adoring, perhaps you may moye me!"

But the blue eye, half hid,

Says, from under its lid,
I love, and I'm yours if you love me !"

Dear Fanny! dear Fanny!
The blue eye, half hid,

Says, from under its lid,
“I love, and am yours if you love me!" dear Fanny!

III.
Then tell me, oh! why,

In that lovely eye,
Not a charm of its tint I discover;

Or why should you wear

The only blue pair
That ever said “No” to a lover?

Dear Fanny! (lear Fanny !
Oh! why should you wear

The only blue pair
"That ever said “No” to a lover, dear Fanny?

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CEASE, OH CEASE TO TEMPT!

I.
CEASE, oh cease to tempt

My tender heart to love!
It never, never can
So wild a flame

approve.
All its joys and pains

To others I resign;
But be the vacant heart,

The careless bosom mine.
Then cease, oh cease to tempt

My tender heart to love!
It never, never can
So wild a flame approve.

II.
Say, oh say no more

That lovers' pains are sweet!
I never, never can

Believe the fond deceit.
Weeping day and night,

Consuming life in sighs,-
This is the lover's lot,

And this I ne'er could prize.
Then say, oh say no more

That lovers' pains are sweet!
I never, never can

Believe the fond deceit.

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DEAR FANNY!

I. She has beauty, but still you must keep your heart cool;

She has wit, but you must not be caught so; Thus Reason advises, but Reason's a fool, And’tis not the first time I have thought so, Dear Fanny!

II. “She is lovely!” Then love her, nor let the bliss fly;

'Tis the charm of youth's vanishing season : Thus Love has advised me, and who will deny That Love reasons much better than Reason,

Dear Fanny?

DID NOT.

I.
'Twas a new feeling—something more

Than we had dared to own before,
Which then we hid not, which then we hid not.

We saw it in each other's eye,

And wish’d, in every murmur'd sigh,
To speak, but did not; to speak, but did not.

II.
She felt my lips impassion'd touch-

'Twas the first time I dared so much, And yet she chid not, and yet she chid not;

But whisperd o'er my burning brow,

“ Oh! do you doubt I love you now ?Sweet soul ! I did not; sweet soul! I did not:

III.
Warmly I felt her bosom thrill,

I press'd it closer, closer still,
Though gently bid not, though gently bid not ;

Till-oh! the world hath seldom heard

Of lovers, who so nearly err'd,
And yet who did not, and yet who did not.

FANNY, DEAREST !

I.
Oh! had I leisure to sigh and mourn,

Fanny, dearest! for thee I'd sigh;
And every smile on my cheek should turn

To tears, when thou art nigh.
But, between love, and wine, and sleep,

So busy a life I live,
That even the time it would take to weep

Is more than my heart can give.
Then bid me not to despair and pine,

Fanny, dearest of all the dears !
The love, that's order'd to bathe in wine,
Would be sure to take cold in tears.

II.
Reflected bright in this heart of mine,
Fanny, dearest ! thy image lies ;

But, oh! the mirror would cease to shine,

If dimm’d too often with sighs. They lose the half of beauty's light,

Who view it through sorrow's tear ;
And'tis but to see thee truly bright

That I keep my eye-beam clear.
Then wait no longer till tears shall flow-

Fanny, dearest! the hope is vain;
If sunshine cannot dissolve thy snow,
I shall never attempt it with rain.

FANNY WAS IN THE GROVE.

I. FANNY was in the grove,

And Lubin, her boy, was nigh; Her eye was warm with love,

And her soul was warm as her eye. Oh! oh! if Lubin now would sue, Oh! oh! what could Fanny do?

II. Fanny was made for bliss,

But she was young and shy; And when he had stolen a kiss,

She blush'd, and said with a sigh“Oh! oh! Lubin, ah! tell me true, Oh! oh! what are you going to do

III.
They wander'd beneath the shade,

Her eye was dimm'd with a tear,
For ah! the poor little maid

Was thrilling with love and fear. Oh ! oh! if Lubin would but sue, Oh! oh! what could Fanny do?

IV. Sweetly along the grove

The birds sang all the while, And Fanny now said to her love,

With a frown that was half a smile“Oh! oh! why did Lubin sue ? Oh! oh! why did Lubin sue?”

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