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II.
Nanny's beaming eye

Looks as warm as any;
But her cheek was pale-

Well-a-day, poor Nanny!
Nanny, in the field,

She pluck'd a little posie,
And Nanny's pallid cheek
Soon grew sleek and rosy.
Oh! the little girls, etc.

III.
Sue, the pretty nun,

Prays with warm emotion;
Sweetly rolls her eye

In love or in devotion.
If her pious heart

Softens to relieve you,
She gently shares the crime,

With, “ Oh! may God forgive you!"
Oh! the little girls,

Wily, warm, and winning;
When angels tempt us to it,

Who can keep from sinning ?

LOVE AND THE SUN-DIAL.

I. Young Love found a Dial once, in a dark shade, Where man ne'er had wander'd nor sunbeam play'd; “Why thus in darkness lie ?" whisper'd young Love, “Thou, whose gay hours should in sunshine move." “I ne'er,” said the Dial,“ have seen the warm sun, “So noonday and midnight to me, Love, are one.”

II. Then Love took the Dial away from the shade, And placed her where Heaven's beam warmly play'd. There she reclined, beneath Love's gazing eye, While, all mark'd with sunshine, her hours flew by. “Oh! how," said the Dial,

fair maid, “That's born to be shone upon, rest in the shade ?" III. But night now comes on, and the sunbeam's o'er, And Love stops to gaze on the Dial no more. Then cold and neglected, while bleak rain and winds Are storming around her, with sorrow she finds That Love had but number'd a few sunny hours, And left the remainder to darkness and showers!

can any

LOVE AND TIME.

I.
"Tis said—but whether true or not

Let bards declare who've seen 'em-
That Love and Time have only got

One pair of wings between 'em.
In courtship's first delicious hour,

The boy full oft can spare 'em,
So, loitering in his lady's bower,
He lets the gray-beard wear 'em.

Then is Time's hour of play ;
Oh! how he flies away!

II.
But short the moments, short as bright,

When he the wings can borrow;
If Time to-day has had his flight,

Love takes his turn to-morrow.
Ah! Time and Love! your change is then

The saddest and most trying,
When one begins to limp again,
And t'other takes to flying,

Then is Love's hour to stray;
Oh ! how he flies away!

III.
But there's a nymph-whose chains 1 feel,

And bless the silken fetter-
Who knows--the dear one!-how to deal

With Love and Time much better.
So well she checks their wanderings,

So peacefully she pairs 'em,
That Love with her ne'er thinks of wings,
And Time for ever wears 'em.

This is Time's holiday ;
Oh! how he flies away!

Y

LOVE, MY MARY, DWELLS WITH THEE.

I.
Love, my Mary, dwells with thee;
On thy cheek his bed I see.
No-that cheek is pale with care;
Love can find no roses there.
'Tis not on the cheek of rose
Love can find the best repose:
In my heart his home thou'lt see;
There he lives, and lives for thee.

II.
Love, my Mary, ne'er can roam,
While he makes that eye his home.
No-the eye with sorrow dim
Ne'er can be a home for him.
Yet, 'tis not in beaming eyes
Love for ever warmest lies :
In my heart his home thou'lt see;
There he lives, and lives for thee.

LOVE'S LIGHT SUMMER-CLOUD.

I.

PAIN and sorrow shall vanish before us

Youth may wither, but feeling will last;
All the shadow that e'er shall fall o'er us,
Love's light summer-cloud sweetly shall cast.

Oh! if to love thee more
Each hour I number o'er-
If this a passion be

Worthy of thee,
Then be happy, for thus I adore thee.

Charms may wither, but feeling shall last :
All the shadow that e’er shall fall o'er thee,
Love's light summer-cloud sweetly shall cast.

II.
Rest, dear bosom! no sorrows shall pain thee,

Sighs of pleasure alone shalt thou steal;
Beam, bright eyelid ! no weeping shall stain thee,

Tears of rapture alone shalt thou feel.

Oh! if there be a charm
In love, to banish harm-
If pleasure's truest spell

Be to love well,
Then be happy, for thus I adore thee.

Charms may wither, but feeling shall last:
All the shadow that e'er shall fall o'er thee,

Love's light summer-cloud sweetly shall cast.

LOVE, WAND'RING THROUGH THE GOLDEN

MAZE.

Love, wand'ring through the golden maze,

Of my beloved's hair,
Traced every lock with fond delays,

And, doting, linger'd there.
And soon he found: 'twere vain to fly;

His heart was closed confined,
And every curlet was a tie-

A chain by beauty twineil.

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MERRILY every bosom boundeth,

Merrily, oh! merrily, oh!
Where the song of Freedom soundeth,
Merrily, oh! merrily, oh!
There the warrior's arms

Shed more splendour,
There the maiden's charms

Shine more tender-
Every joy the land surroundeth,
Merrily, oh! merrily, oh!

II.
Wearily every bosom pineth,

Wearily, oh! wearily, oh!
Where the bond of slavery twineth,

Wearily, oh ! wearily, oh!

There the warrior's dart

Hath no fleetness,
There the maiden's heart

Hath no sweetness
Every flower of life declineth,
Wearily, oh! wearily, oh!

III.
Cheerily then from hill and valley,

Cheerily, oh! cheerily, oh!
Like your native fountains sally,
Cheerily, oh! cheerily, oh!
If a glorious death,

Won by bravery,
Sweeter be than breath

Sigh’d in slavery,
Round the flag of Freedom rally,

Cheerily, oh! cheerily, oh!

NOW LET THE WARRIOR.

Now let the warrior plume his steed,

And wave his sword afar ;
For the men of the East this day shall bleed,

And the sun shall blush with war.
Victory sits on the Christian's helm

To guide her holy band : The Knight of the Cross this day shall whelm The men of the Pagan land.

Oh! bless'd who in the battle dies!

God will enshrine him in the skies! Now let the warrior plume his steed,

And wave his sword afar, For the men of the East this day shall bleed,

And the sun shall blush with war.

OH, LADY FAIR!

1.
Oh, Lady fair! where art thou roaming?
The sun has sunk, the night is coming.
Stranger, I go o'er moor and mountain,
To tell my beads at Agnes' fountain.

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