A History of New York: From the Beginnimg of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty. Containing, Among Many Surprising and Curious Matters, the Unutterable Ponderings of Walter the Doubter, the Disasterous Projects of William the Testy, and the Chivalric Achievements of Peter the Headstrong. The Three Dutch Governors of New Amsterdam : Being the Only Authentic History of the Times that Hath Ever Been Published, 1. köide

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C.S. Van Winkle, 1824
 

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Page 168 - This decision being straightway made known, diffused general joy throughout New Amsterdam, for the people immediately perceived, that they had a very wise and equitable magistrate to rule over them. But its happiest effect was, that not another lawsuit took place throughout the whole of his administration — and the office of constable fell into such decay, that there was not one of those losel scouts known in the province for many years. I am the more particular in dwelling on this transaction,...
Page 164 - His habits were as regular as his person. He daily took his four stated meals, appropriating exactly an hour to each; he smoked and doubted eight hours, and he slept the remaining twelve of the four-and-twenty.
Page 162 - This, by the way, is a casual remark, which I would not for the universe have it thought I apply to Governor Van Twiller.
Page 189 - At these primitive tea-parties the utmost propriety and dignity of deportment prevailed. No flirting nor coquetting, — no gambling of old ladies, nor hoyden chattering and romping of young ones, — no self-satisfied struttings of wealthy gentlemen, with their brains in their pockets, nor amusing conceits and monkey divertisements of smart young gentlemen with no brains at all. On the contrary, the young ladies seated themselves demurely in their rush-bottomed chairs, and knit their own woollen...
Page 186 - The fireplaces were of a truly patriarchal magnitude, where the whole family, old and young, master and servant, black and white, nay, even the very cat and dog, enjoyed a community of privilege, and had each a right to a corner.
Page 190 - The parties broke up without noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door...
Page 158 - ... of the meadows — all which happy coincidence persuaded the old dames of New Amsterdam, who were skilled in the art of foretelling events, that this was to be a happy and prosperous administration.
Page 188 - The tea was served out of a majestic delft teapot ornamented with paintings of fat little Dutch shepherds and shepherdesses tending pigs, with boats sailing in the air, and houses built in the clouds, and sundry other ingenious Dutch fantasies.
Page 194 - ... cabbage. Certain it is, that in those days, the heart of a lover could not contain more than one lady at a time ; whereas the heart of a modern gallant has often room enough to accommodate half a dozen. The reason of which I conclude to be, that either the hearts of the gentlemen have grown larger, or the persons of the ladies smaller. — This, however, is a question for physiologists to determine.
Page 185 - The front door was never opened except on marriages, funerals, new years' days, the festival of St. Nicholas, or some such great occasion. — It was ornamented with a gorgeous brass knocker, curiously wrought, sometimes in the device of a dog, and sometimes of a lion's head, and was daily burnished with such religious zeal, that it was oft times worn out by the very precautions taken for its preservation.

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