The History of India from the Earliest Ages, 1. köide

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Contents

Characteristics of Súrya or the Sun
22
Comparison of ancient and modern personifications
28
CHAPTER I
42
Foundation of the great Raj of Bhárata by Raja Bharata
48
Gandharva marriage a union without marriage ceremonies
49
Distance of Benares from Hastinápur
56
Pándu and Vidura The myth proved to be an interpolation by the supernatural
60
418
66
CHAPTER II
73
Distinction between the two classes of Bráhmans viz 1
78
Galleries adorned with flags and garlands
86
Importance of the history of India
96
Significance of the legend of the division of the Raj
97
The fiction inserted to associate the Pándavas with the city
104
History of British administration distinct from the history
106
Extraordinary honeymoon of Bhíma and Hidimbi
110
The Pandavas resolve to attend
118
Raja Drupada sends his Purohita as Envoy to the Pandavas
125
Fears the consequences of her words
130
Duryodhanas surprise at the marvels at Indraprastha
134
v
138
Memory of the incident preserved in a later myth
140
Visit to Parasu Ráma
146
Brahmanical revival 800 A D et
159
The Argha given to Krishna
170
CHAPTER VII
175
Mythical losses of Yudhishthira
179
CHAPTER VIII
187
Difficulties in apprehending the history of the Hundús
190
Advance of the Aryans into the Dekhan
191
Indications that the Pandavas never wandered at a great dis
193
The animals of the jungle implore Yudhishthira to leave
199
Jayadratha carries away Draupadí in his chariot by main force
200
Draupadí enters the presence of the Rání
207
Youth and ignorance of Uttar
221
Falls in love with Draupadí
227
come to me last
245
Bhíshma threatens that Arjuna will conquer Karna
251
Diplomatic qualifications of Sanjaya
252
Sends a Chieftain to inquire her name and lineage
257
Yudhishthira applies to Krishna for counsel
258
Krishnas visit to Duryodhana
260
Advice of Krishna to Duryodhana
266
Brahmanical origin of the rules
284
Long chronological interval between the age in which
286
Supernatural details
288
Brahmanical discourses
290
Thirteenth day of the war and third of Dronas command
310
Returns to the quarters of the Pandavas in the camp of
344
Aswattháma escapes with the heads of the five sons of the PAGB
350
Passionate desire for revenge exhibited by the surviving
356
Burning of the remaining bodies
365
U Picture of an ancient Hindú procession ib
373
Great attractions of the Aswamedha
379
Krishna praised by a eulogist
389
Night of the loosening on the full moon of the month Choitro
396
The horse fastened to the rock
399
Infancy of Krishna and Balaráma
471
Portentous dreams of Kansa
472
Main incidents of the story
478
Assembly of the Rajas in the Hall of State
485
The four gods remonstrate with Kali
486
the name of Váhuka
491
Nala freed from Kali
497
Damayantí sends for a portion of the meat which Nala
498
The gods grant her prayer and reveal themselves in their true
503
The second Swayamvara opposed to Brahmanical ideas
504
The Bráhmans a professional class officiating for both Aryans
509
Sarmishthá obeys
515
Review of the foregoing legends of Devayání
519
Resolves on the death of Chandrahasa
525
Raja in the garden
528
The Minister in jealousy resolves on the destruction of Chand
531
U The marriage of Draupadí referred to the earliest period
535
Existing remains of serpent worship
536
The Brahmanic age coeval with the composition of the
537
Absence of the Pándavas in the camp of the Kauravas
538
Conformity of the story to the traditions referring to Krishna
539
Sarmishthas defence
540
Rules framed by Bhishma and Drona and agreed to by Yud
541
Clubfighting
542
307
543
Question of how far the elements of an opposition of classes
544
Letter of the Minister to his son Madan
545
Presentation of the Argha not to be found in the ancient ritual
546
Inferiority of the speeches to those in Homer and Thucydides
547
Damayantí discovers Nala and gives him the garland
548
Reign of the blind Dhritarashtra 65
549
Her curses and threats
550
Duryodhana jealous of the Rajasúya plots to dispossess
551
Historical form of the tradition
552
Exultation of Duryodhana and mortification of Arjuna
553
Brahmans
555
270
556
55
557
The Argha attributed to the Buddhist period
558
Bhíma retorts that Krishnas stomach contains the universe
559
Story of Gándhári blindfolding herself
560
Exaggerations and embellishments to be treated with
561
Draupadi distributes the provisions at supper in the place
562
Married to a Rishi but refuses to fulfil her duties
563
Extraordinary plot of the Kauravas to burn the Pandavas
564
138
565
Mádrí the sister of a Raja of Madra on the southern slope
566
Absence of allusions to animal sacrifice in the description
567
84
568
58
569
Krishna revenges his death
570
Mysterious attributes of water 21
572
Invasion of Susarman in the northern quarter
573
283
574
Yudhishthira requires that Sakuni should play fair
575
Bards and eulogists chaunt the praises of Yudhishthira
576

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Page 158 - Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of Sodom! Give ear unto the law of our God, ye people of Gomorrah! To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me ? saith the Lord. I am full of the burnt-offerings of rams, and the fat of
Page 158 - unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; it is iniquity, even the solemn meeting. Your new moons and your appointed feasts my soul hateth ; they are a trouble unto me; I am weary to bear them
Page 158 - beasts, and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he-goats. When you come to appear before me, who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts ? Bring no more vain oblations! Incense is
Page 29 - God above all gods :—Who is the God to whom we shall offer our sacrifice ? " May He not destroy us, He, the creator of the earth; or He, the righteous, who created the heaven; He who also created the bright and mighty waters:—Who is the God to whom we shall offer our sacrifice
Page 29 - Wherever the mighty water-clouds went, where they placed the seed and lit the fire, thence arose He who is the only life of the bright gods :—Who is the God to whom we shall offer our sacrifice ? " He who by his might looked even over the waterclouds, the clouds which gave strength and lit the sacrifice, He who
Page 19 - the gods. He is felt, at the time, as a real divinity—as supreme and absolute, in spite of the necessary limitations which, to our mind, a plurality of gods must entail on every single god. All the rest disappear for a moment from the vision
Page 23 - as follows :—" Let us adore the supremacy of that divine sun, the godhead, who illuminates all, who recreates all, from whom all proceed, to whom all must return, whom we invoke to direct our
Page 29 - nay, the highest heaven : He who measured out the light in the air: —Who is the God to whom we shall offer our sacrifice ? " He to whom heaven and earth, standing firm by his
Page 455 - sages; who has bound human beings in a chain, of which one end is life and the other death; on whom the Rishis meditate, and a knowledge, of whom imparts unalloyed happiness to their hearts ; and for whose gratification and favour all the daily devotions are performed by all worshippers. If a man reads the
Page 496 - The driving is like the driving of Jehu, the son of Nimshi, for he driveth furiously.

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