The life and opinions of Tristram Shandy, gentleman, 2. köide

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J. C. Nimmo and Bain, 1883
 

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Page 310 - Time wastes too fast: every letter I trace tells me with what rapidity Life follows my pen; the days and hours of it, more precious, my dear Jenny! than the rubies about thy neck, are flying over our heads like light clouds of a windy day, never to return more — every thing presses on — whilst thou art twisting that lock, — see! it grows grey; and every time I kiss thy hand to bid adieu, and every absence which follows it, are preludes to that eternal separation which we are shortly to make.
Page 77 - My uncle Toby went to his bureau, put his purse into his breeches pocket, and, having ordered the Corporal to go early in the morning for a physician, he went to bed and fell asleep.
Page 336 - God help her ! poor damsel ! above a hundred masses, said the postillion, have been said in the several parish churches and convents around, for her — but without effect. We have still hopes, as she is sensible for short intervals, that the Virgin at last will restore her to herself; but her parents, who know her best, are hopeless upon that score, and think her senses are lost for ever.
Page 71 - A soldier, an' please your reverence,' said I, 'prays as often (of his own accord) as a parson ; and when he is fighting for his king, and for his own life, and for his honour, too, he has the most reason to pray to God, of any one in the whole world.' " " 'Twas well said of thee, Trim," said my Uncle Toby. " ' But when a soldier,' said I,
Page 68 - It was not till my uncle Toby had knocked the ashes out of his third pipe that corporal Trim returned from the inn, and gave him the following account :
Page 76 - He shall not drop," said my uncle Toby, firmly. " A-well-o'day, do what we can for him," said Trim, maintaining his point ; " the poor soul will die." " He shall not die, by G — ," cried my uncle Toby. The accusing spirit, which flew up to heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in ; and the recording angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Page 353 - I am far from denying — but philosophy speaks freely of every thing; and therefore I still think and do maintain it to be a pity, that it should be done by means of a passion which bends down the faculties, and turns all the wisdom, contemplations, and operations of the soul backwards — a passion, my dear, continued my father, addressing himself to my mother, which couples and equals wise men with fools, and makes us come out of our caravans and hiding-places more like satyrs and four-footed...
Page 70 - I saw his son take up a cushion. 1 thought, said the curate, that you gentlemen of the army, Mr. Trim, never said your prayers at all. I heard the poor gentleman say his prayers last night, said the landlady, very devoutly, and with my own ears, or I could not have believed it. Are you sure of it ? replied the curate. A soldier, an...
Page 70 - What could be the matter with me, an' please your honour ? Nothing in the world, Trim, said my uncle Toby, blowing his nose, but that thou art a good-natured fellow. When I gave him the toast, continued the Corporal, I thought it was proper to tell him I was Captain Shandy's servant, and that your honour (though a stranger) was extremely concerned for his father ; and that if there was any thing in your house or cellar, — (And thou mightst have added my purse too, said my uncle Toby), — he was...
Page 77 - ... would have done it, and asked him how he did, — how he had rested in the night, — what was his complaint, — where was his pain, — and what he could do to help him ; — and without giving him time to answer any one of the inquiries, went on and told him of the little plan which he had been concerting with the Corporal the night before for him. You shall go home directly, Le Fevre...

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